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October 19, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

As THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts & Entertainm ent Tuesday, October 19, 1976 Page Five

'U' gal
By KATHERINE FRIEDM
COLLAGES, soulptures,pa
ings and even a microsc
are among the fare decora
the Slusser Gallery on N
Campus these days. They
part of an exhibition - runr
through this Saturday - of n
ern works by 27 painters f
state colleges and univers
all across Michigan.
Some artists complained
their pointings had been hun
high that a twisted cranium
strained eyes were necessit,
in order to view them.
Artist Al Hinton (of Wes
Michigan), however, foun
way around the dilemma -
was familiar with the gal
and painted his entry to be b
high. The work is a conglor
ate of feelings toward his fr
Cynthia Miller. Miller,
worked as a prison psycholc
was found murdered in her
last summer. Subdued blues
grays and splats of light in
chromosomal fashion make
trast a part of the cloudy
iousness of the painting.
MOST OF the other paint
in the show were done in
sections, each dependent of
other. For instance, Robert
ber of Wayne State Univer
presentd "Still Life with C
and Brushes" and "Stiol
With Fan." The two were tr

lery

hosts Michigan

art

AN
aint-
rope
ting
orth
are
ning
nod-
rom
ities
that
g so
and
ated

ed as masculine and feminine University. In it, the subject is
entities; the first was full of wearing a T-shirt. His slicked-'
heavy objects draped in a sub- back hair and dangling cigarette
dued light, contrasting with are reminiscent of a So's TV
frivolous, light colors in the show.
fan painting. This feeling is accentuated
One particularly original paint- by the canvas, which is cut in
ing was a self-portrait done by the shape of a TV screen, and
Greg Constantine or Andrews the paint, which is layered is

brightly colored oval sections
giving the impression of a color
screen on the blink. The same
technique is used in a com-
panion painting, entitled "Back-
man Self Portrait."
Most of the other works ex-
hibited were also original in
form, design and color.

U' Choir performs skillfully

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
A JEWELRY MAKER surveys his works at last weekend's
Artists' and Craftsmen's Festival, on the grounds of the
Community High School.

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Earth, Wirnd and Fire
Earth, Wind and Fire's lead vocalist Maurice White,
and bass player Verdine White enjoy themselves as they
get down in Sunday's concert at Eastern Michigan.

r

tern By SHELLEY WOLSON the program with its far East- Although it was the longest
d a rlHE UNIVERSITY Chamber ern flavor and unusual melo- on the program, the Brahms
he 1 Choir presented quite a dies. It was received quite well was performed extremely well
lery varied program last Saturday by the audience and one ob- and showed off many of the
lung night, with selections ranging servor even gave it a loud choir's well - trained vocalists.
ter- from the Oriental "The Odes "bravo!" Two pianos were used in it,
iend of Shang" to the familiar "Peo- THE NEXT selection was the creating a nice effect combined
who ple" of "Funny Girl." beautiful "Trois Chansons" by with the choir's obvious delight
)gist Under the brisk, skilful direc- Claude Debussy. This excellent in singing this selection.
car tion of Conductor Thomas Hil- composition was complemented Finally, the choir gave us a
and bish, the forty-voice choir per- by the choir's equally beautiful beautiful rendition of Juli
long formed five selections. The first rendition of it. For this ob- Styne's "People." It added a
con- number was the pleasant sound- server, it was the highlight of bit of lightness to the progran
ser ing "O Nata Lux" by Thomas the performance, only slightly and left the audience with a
Tallis, and was done acappella. surpassed by the magnitude of good feeling. Altogether it was
ings For non-professional artists, the the fourth number - the "Neve a delightful performance, with
two choir's program came very Liebeslieder," op. 65, of enough variety to please all
the close to excellence. Brahms. music lovers.
Wil- The second number in the
rsity show was the unique "The Odes
lock of Shang" by Seymour Shifrin.
Life Accompanied by imaginative in-
eat- struments, this piece spiced up
-N
_ SONEGROUND
_q-PLUS-
SDAY iNIGH
AST BEEF SANDWICH LADIES NIGHT
cr nd BO'wn Gi, "Uv $2,49
ADIES NIGHT All Ladies get FREE Admission
:duc,-d Prices on al
iko, and tequila drinks HOURS: Fri. & Sat. p.m.-2 a m.
'ru s i .00 with Student 1.D. H
WEEKLY HOURS:9 p.m.-2 a.m.
DAY
ITALIAN LASAGNA 516 E. Liberty 994-5350
er kuI $1.49
HERS OF FROSTY BEER r / s l a : 1.1 : 1.1 : ]~~ : i:
T REDUCED PRICES
}orge <'S1.00 wih Student I D, --- - -
ND and his guitar wil be pe.rtorm-
ner enjoyment Mon. -Fri. 4-7 pm.
\/ E

Artfai'r
draws
shoppers
By CHRIS DYHDALO
HlAND)MADE TIES flopped'
around in the biting wind, as
the people behind the striped
booths snuggled into their jack-
ets.
But, despite the chilly weath-
er, there was no shortage of
shoppers at the University Ar-
tists and Craftsmen Guild Fall
Art Festival last Saturday. The s
early morning rush at the
Farmers' M a r k e t migrated
across the street to the grounds
of the Community High School to
take a look at wares other than
pumpkins and celery stalks.
The 73 exhibits offered a di-
verse collection of arts and
crafts - everything from ma-
crame wall hangings to delicate
wire sculptures hung in th,e
makeshift booths occpuied by
the artists themselves.
Long glass cases held quan-
tities of ;silver jewerly. Original,
in d e s i g n and intricately
wrought, the jewelry available
was good stuff at any rate.
IF YOU were in need of a
pipe, you had an interesting
choice of material - they were
made from the horns of Rocky
Mountain elk or deel (environ-
mentalists would disapprove).
For a slightly higher cost, you
could have an inlaid wooden
handle as well.
Wooden objects were perhaps
the most versatile and abundant
at the fair. Hand crafted bowls
sold for $45 to $5. Imported
woodsfof varying grains and:
colors were arranged in striped
fashion to make striking cheese
boards. Ever hear of Zebra
wood?
One things there was plenty
of was pottery. Countless bowls,
planters, vases, goblets, ash-
trays and anything else you
could think of lined myriad
shelves in the booths.
NEW ENU
at the
- L
V-BEL
530-900
'VINTAGE
WINES
at Retil Prices

in cooperation with
Major Events Office
and UAC. TICKETS
$5.50, $4.50,
$3.50aot Michigan
Union Box Office
10 a.m.-5. p.m.,
.Schoolkids and both
Discount Records.
INFORMATION
763-1107.
Late comers will not
be seated during
performance.

T~UEt
L)
Rc~c
crW E N ESI
SAVORYi
F> LiPITCH

CW ST -9 59s s A

MO NDAY"-
LASAGNA NIGHT
All the Homemade Lasagna you can seat
Salad included. $150
TUESDAY- WEDNESDAY-
TEMPURA NIGHT HADDOCK NIGHT
All the 7-Vegetable and Rice Tempura you All the Flakey Fried Haddock you can eat .,.
can eat. Greek Salad included.., includes Cole Slaw.
$3.50 $3.50
THURSDAY- FRIDAY-
PIZZA NIGHT CHICKEN NIGHT
All the Pizza and Salad you can eat. All the Baked or Barbequed Chicken you can
$2.25 eat. Served with Salad and Corn-on-the-Cob.
* $3.50
SATURDAY- SUNDAY-
STEAK and SHELLS NIGHT TURKEY and DRESSING DAY
A generous Top Sirloin Steak, served with all A Thanksgiving every wee- with all the
the Shells and Salad you can eat. trimmings.
$5.50 $5.25
f _g

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NEWS FROM THE
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
more from our trunk of tidbits
Jackson Browne's long-awaited new album, The
Pretender, will be released in about a month. He
began work on it following a personal tragedy-
the suicide-death of his wife Phyllis last March,
Although he's beginning, once again, to make
personal appearances, his only show all summer
was the Eagles-Linda Ronstadt-Jackson Browne-
Dan Fogelberg benefit for Jerry Brown. Good to
see him back in action.
Peter Frampton was guest of Steven Ford at the
White House in September. The President, com-
menting on the guitarist's amazing success, said:
"I'd like to be number one for 14 weeks in the
Gallup Poll." Frampton's presently recording a
new album, to be released this January. Inci-
dentally, his live version of the blockbuster hit
"Baby, I Love Your Ways" was originally a flop
as a studio-recorded single . . . ahh, for the
cheers of a crowd.
ZZ Top's Worldwide Texas Tour 1976, although
grossing over 20 million dollars, reminded one
of Noah's Ark. Appearing in the show was a long-
horn steer, a buffalo, a rattlesnake, a buzzard,
and a tarrantula not necessarily in that order).
Four animal handlers toured with the group, while
the promoters supplied a veterinarian. Besides
animals, ZZ carried a 35-ton stage in the shape
of the state of Texas. It took 100 grounds crew
members and 85 stagehands to set up the eight
semi truckloads of equipment. Behind the stage
was a 3-D panorma of Texas, handpainted by 16
artists in an aircraft hanger in Waco, Texas. It
was lit by 96,000 watts of power, with 260 speak-
ers providing the sound. All for three little-ole
boys from Texas... .
After an 18-month wait, Stevie Wonder's new
album, Songs in the Key of Life, was a new entry
on the Billboard charts-as the number one album
in the nation the first week it was released. .. .
Judy Collins' new disc, Bread and Roses, will soon
be her seventh straight gold album. The title cut

!

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