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October 16, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-16

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Soturdoy October 16, 1,976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

race Five

S _ura,Ocoe 6196TEMCGA DAL

Scientists form

committee

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

to

monitor

DNA research

WASHINGTON (A) - A pro-
minent international body of
scientists has formed a com-
mittee to monitor as well as
promote controversial genetic
research that is potentially,
both beneficial and dangerous.
The International Council of
Scientific Unions (ICSU), com-
posed of scientific groups from'
100 nations, announced forma-
tion of the committee Thursday
at a meeting held at the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences.
SIR JOHN KENDREW,
ICSU secretary general, said
the Committee on Genetic Ex-
perimentation would try to do
internationally what some gov-

ernments are doing alone. That
is, to make sure the research
is conducted safely and for
the benefit, not detriment, of
mankind.
Scientists at the meeting
agreed such an international
watchdog has been needed be-
cause results of the research
could affect the world.
Of concern is so-called recom-
binant DNA research, in which
genetic material from one spe-
cies of life is combined with
that of another species. This
produces organisms with char-
acteristics of both species.
PROPONENTS O F
the research say it could lead

to cures for genetic diseases,s
living cellular "factories" that
make enzymes for treating dis-
eases and plants that can grow
well without artificial fertilizer.I
Opponents say the research
could produce super disease
germs immune to all known
treatment or organisms that
could change or harm the en-
vironment.
Dr. Philip Handler, head of
the U.S. delegation to ICSU
and president of the National
Academy of Sciences, said the
momentum of the research is
so strong that it couldn't be
banned effectively, as some sci-
entists would like.

FBIs

Kelleyshies away

from attack on news media

"THE PURPOSE of the com-
mittee is to see that as this re-
search goes forward, it goes
forward with safeguards,"
Handler said at a briefing.
Kendrew said the committee,
which could be in operation by
January 1977 with a :projected
first year budget of $172,000,
could be effective as a source
of information and expert ad-
vice on genetic research.
Even though ICSU is nonpo-
litical and not connected with
any government, Kendrew said,
the committee could supply ad-
vice to nations considering re-
search guidelines.
The committee also could tell
the world if it found out a na-
tion was conducting research
without proper safeguards, the
scientists said. While the group
would have no regulatory pow-
ers to force compliance with
safety rules,, such a revelation
could bring pressure on that
country from other nations and
the scientific community, Ken-
drew said.
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By AP and Renter , 1news media of reporting FBI
WASHINGTON - FBI Direc- misdeeds unfairly and of at-
tor Clarence Kelley late yester- tempting to discredit the
day backed away from a pre- bureau.
pared speech in which he had "If a journalist continually
threatened to end bureau co- displays an obsession to support
operation with news 'reporters his own hostile notions about
he described as hostile. our agency, or to support a5
In a statement issued by the boiler-plate editorial policy with-
Justice Department, Kelley said out regard for objectivity, then
he was retracting the speech he cannot expect to continue to
because it "appears to give the enjoy any sort of productive
wrong impression and does not relationship with us," Kelley
truly reflect my feelings 'about said in the prepared speech.
the press." 3
"WE WILL NOT continue to
THE TEXT of the speech, in- throw open the doors for those
tended for delivery to the New who invariably dash us with
Mexico Press Association in Al- scalding water," the speech
buquerque last night, was dis- said. "We were journalistically1
tributed to reporters here Thurs- bludgeoned - not by full expo-
day. sure of all the facts but by
In the' text, Kelley accused systematic selection and em-
some members of the national phasis of facts, with some
'Sunken F14 found?
WASHINGTON UP) - The The Navy has placed aboard
Navy announced yesterday that the Constructor an underwater
a search tug has made a sonar vehicle called CURV, which
contact with what may possi- carries television cameras. The
bly be the wreckage of a multi- plan is t- send the unmanned
million dollar plane which CURV - 'icle down to take a
rolled into the North Atlantic look at the spot of reported
from the deck of the aircraft contact.
carrier John F. 'Kennedy a The F14 is loaded with so-
month ago. phisticated electronic equipment
It said the Navy tug Shakori, and one new Phoenix missile.t
which hasbeen searching the However, thereis.no indication
seas about 75 miles northwest whether the plane, if finally lo-
of Scapa Flow, "has located a cated, is in one piece.
contact worthy of investiga- The F14 fell into the North
tion." tanti 4 afer an enrhs
A privately owned motor ship, hAtlandic after an engine mis-
the Constructor, left Aberdeen, hap ng NATOemaneuvers.
Scotland, to try to verify whe- -Its to-man crew escaped.
ther the contactis the 1o s14 The Soviet Navy, which sha-
and to prepare to try to raise is d owed the NATO maneuvers,
from about 1,900 feet below indicated some interest in the
the surface. location of the F14 shortly after

heavy - handed 'interpretation',
thrown in," it said of past cov-
erage.
In the later statement, Kelley
said he is "casting aside most
of the prepared text." He said
he would "speak from the heart,
but without what I now recog-
nize could be misinterpreted."
Kelley said he had intended'
in the speech "to point out the;
need whereby we could join to-
gether in an effort to raise the'
FBI to a higher level of produc-
tion."
Referring to news coverage
of FBI wrongdoing, currently
the target of two department
criminal investigations, Kelleyj
said "past activities have been
spotlighted, and rightfully so."

Bicycle Jim's is a campus favorite for relaxed drinking and eating. The
second stor'Olion affords an interesting Perspective of pedestrians

GEN ERAL MEETINiG
* f SKI CL U B
ALL SKIERS WELCOME
Discussion of Christmas.
Vacation Ski Trip
Thurs., Oct. 21-7:00 p.m.
Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union

scurrying about South, Un
Wheels are generally associated with the ultra-fast motion
of modern society.
But there's a place hard by the glutted campus streets
where spoked tires take on an older shape and a more re-
freshing connotation-Bicycle Jim's restaurant. "B.J.'s" as
the restaurant is affectionately known among patrons pro-
vides a welcome change for many students.
'What we're striving for is to bring the students a quality
of food they can't get anywhere else on campus," says one of
the managers, Don Schultz.
He boasts that "nothing here is pre-packaged," everything
is freshly prepared at the restaurant, which serve a largely
student clientele.
"On weekends, we get a lot of people from out of town
too--they probably think it's a typically college place to go,"
he grins.
Weekends are the busiest time for the restaurant, although
there always seems to be a steady stream of hungry people
entering the second-floor eatery, on the corner of South Uni-
versity and South Forest.
"There's a line virtually all the time on Friday and Satur-
da-ynrights," says Schultz.
To get to the meat of the story, B.J.'s has the best. It's
usually in the form of hamburgers and deli sandwiches, but
what hamburgers! Theyfre charcoal-broiled on the outside and
tender pink on the inside-and the patties are half-a-pound of
fresh meat, about five inches across and smothered with all
sorts of delectable condiments.
All the names on the menus reflect the bicycle motif' of
the restaurant: High Wheeler, Plain Wheeler, Ted-Speed, etc.
The High Wheeler, the most exepnsive hamburger offer-
ing, is decked with tomatoes, lettuce, bacon and cheese (swiss,
cheddar or muenster) on an onion bun, and comes with a
bowl of creamy cole-slaw. The only dilemma you will run
into by ordering it is whether to finish eating it or not. Be-
cause, if you do, you will have no room for dessert-and this
is a non-no at B.J.'s, home of the most scrumptuous, fluffy
cheesecake in town (made from scratch and dribbled with
brandy or Grand Marnier).

iversity.
But wait, there's one other dilemma: how are you spposed
to eat the thing? I've watched people trying to figure this
out many times, and have decided that, unless you have an
enormous mouth, the best way is to take off the top and use
a knife and fork.
Other favorites at Bicycle Jim's are the seafood dishes-
fish-and-chips or 'catch of .the day'-and the fried mushrooms,
which you can dip in a pot of Dijon mustard provided at your
table. The salad bar is also very popular since you get a
"bottomless" bowl, whether as a meal in itself or with an
entree. In addition to the normal salad bar type, there are
a variety of fresh vegetables, mushroQms, cheese, etc.
On Mondays and Tuesdays, the restaurant features a
spaghetti special where you can get an enormous platter 'of
the Italian favorite for only 99 cents (everyday prices at B.J.'s
range from around $1 to $5 fora New York strip steak).
Then there is Sunday brunch, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This
meal features a mouth-watering choice of gourmet dishes
such as Quiche Lorraine, Eggs Continental, crepes, and frozen
yogurt with fresh fruit (new thisy year from Dannon), as well
as espresso coffee.
Whether you go to Bicycle Jim's for a quick lunch (11:30-
1:30, Mon.-Sat.), a leisurely dinner (through 10 p.m.) or a
couple of drinks-it's open til 2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays-
you will find the atmosphere congenial and relaxing. The
decor is uniquely nostalgic, with an emphasis on deep, warm
reds, greens and oranges that, in combination with old-fash
ioned curve-back chairs and curtained-off private booths, give
it a homey air.
The place abounds with pictures and parts of turn-of-the
century bicycles. Even the menu, printed on a brown paper
bag and coveted by people who collect beer mugs, sports
a picture of a man in Edwardian garb and a handlebar mus-
tache, riding a unicycle and balancing two mugs of beer.
"Very casual and comfortable" is how Don Schultz de-
scribes his domain; and you, like many others, may be sucked
into an endless discussion on history and ethics over a bowl
of fried mushrooms one night.

THE CONSTRUCTOR is used
for oil field operations in the
North Atlantic and is equipped
with heavy cranes.

it went down, but has made no
effort at recovering the plane,
which could yield important in-
telligence information.

x isS: as $:{ :'t %#;j::: #i::: :i{"ii:i:" : :
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

TONIGHT in MLB!
MARX BROS.
MONKEY BUSINESS
(Norman McLeod, ?931 ) 7 &9:30
Is a plot necessary in a Marx Bros, film? For the sake of tradition,
this time the boys are trying to stow away on a trans-Atlantic
liner and somehow end ap paired off as rival ganster's bodyguards.
In between, the laughs fly as fast as the puns.
HORSEFEATHERS
(Norman McLead, 1932) 8:10 & 10:40
This time the Marx Bros. take their madness to the college cam-
pus. Groucho returns to his alma mater as the new college
president and hopes to win the annual football classic. En route,
they go through some of their famous routines-"secret pass-
word-swordfish."
DEATH RACE 2000
(Paul Bartel, 1975) 7 & 10:30
The top 'B' picture of 1975. grosser of $8,000.000! Cartoonish vio-
lence parodies and easily tops ROLLERBALL. Dig Carradine's
leathers and the zwoopy cars. Hit-and-run driving is the na-
tional sport with points being racked up by running down hapless
pedestrians. Like most 'B' films-more relevant than it sounds,
more fun than "relevant" films. "DEATH RACE 2000 once again
demonstrates that imagination can overcome the tightest budget."
-L.A. Times.
BRUCE LEE AIEEE!
FISTS OF FURY
(Lo Wei, 1973) 8:30 ONLY
This is the film that propelled Bruce Lee to stardom and made
him the international box office champion. He plays a passive
factory worker who has promised his family he'd live a life of
non-violence. Then the Mob starts to insult and degrade him.
Lee takes it, and takes it until finally . . . he explodes! This
explosion helps explain why FISTS OF FU RY grossed 3.5 million
dollars in 19 days in Hong Kong alone! If you've never seen Bruce
Lee, you're denying yourself a unique cinematic experience. "To
tell you the truth, I could beat anyone in the world."-Bruce Lee.
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00

DOWNTOWN
114 E. Washington

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent In TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 P.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are'
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Saturday, October 16, 1976
Day Calendar
Artists. Craftsmen Guild Fall1
Festival: by Farmer's Market, 8
am.
WUOM: Linus Pauling "Science
& the Future,' 1 pm.
Ext. Serv: Assertive Training
Workshop; Kellogg Bldg.
Football: broadcast. UM vs North-
western, (WUOM) 2:15 pm.
PTP: Shakespeare's "Othello,"
Power Ctr, 8 pm,
Music School: Chamber. Choir;a
Hill Aud., 8 pm.
Bursley Hall Enterprises: "The
Great waldo Pepper," W. Cafeteria,
8,30 pm.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
RECRUITING ON-CAMPUS:
Oct. 18 - American Hospital Sup-
ply Corp.
Oct. 19 - Stanford U :Sch. of Bus..-
American Hospital Supply'Corp.
Oct. 19 - Stanford U./Sch. of Bus..
American Hospital Supply Corp.
Oct. 20 - Rike's. The Procter &
Gamble Distributing Co.. Providence
Hospital, Lord and Ttylor.
Oct. 21-PRE-LAW CONFERENCE
- Over thirty five law schools will
have representatives on campus to;
provide information on programs
financial aid, and curriculum, and
admissions. All students are cordi-
ally invited to attend. 10 am. to 4.
pm. in the Michigan League.
Got to get here
early, so you can
play late.
DINRAI I

Oct. 22 - Ea,0man Kodak Co.,
K-Mart Apparel.
Phone: 764-7460 for information
on the following:
CEW SCHOLARSHIPS FOR WOM-
EN available to women whose edu-
cation has been interrupted for at
least 24 months & who are pursu-
ing an academic/prof. degree pro-j
gram, full/part-time.
Residency in Hospital Pharmacy
available at Rhode Island Hospital
Providence, R.I.
Fellowships and Internships for
PhD's in Clinical Psychology avail-1
able with the Devereux Foundation
in Philadelphia and may also be
available in Calif. & Texas.
MADEMOISELLE COLLEGE BOARD
GUEST EDITOR COMPETITION -
A salaried month as Guest Editor,
working with regular editors in New
York office. Details available at;
CP&P.

soar, - 4m
,. _

:. 665-3231

BICYCLE JIM'S
Featuring DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES, and now
FROZEN YOGURT!
Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-6
OPEN: M-Th until 12 and
F-Sat. until 2
Sun. until 1 0
1301 S. UNIVERSITY

f
665-2650

Complete Italian-American Menu
ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET DINNERS
WEDS. SUNDAY
SEAFOOD BUFFET ITALIAN BUFFET
Adults-$4.95 Adults-$3.49
Children--$2.99 Children-$l.49

I

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Chinesea
~-Casual Din
Carry-out
-= _-= Banquet R

3020 Packard
(at Platt)

THE LORD FOXt
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST DINING
We offer a very wide selection of fresh seafood items,
a distinguished wine list and cellar, tableside des-
serts, and tasteful service in a pictur'esque country
setting.

and Korean Cuisine
ing Roorm 911-6442
Service HOURS:
M-S: 12-2 p.m
ac tiesi 3-9 p.m.
ac jitiItes Closed Sunday

I

n.

5400 PLYMOUTH ROAD

668-9387

IMPORTANT GRADUATION
INFORMATION
Graduation portraits now being taken
MAKE YOUR
APPOINTMENT
NOW

wn i w -

.... ,.

WA
6 L UIMP
F D
S BEEF
HOURS: Wed., Thurs., Fri. 4 p.m.-r
Saturday 4-10 p.m.
Sunday 1 1 :30 a.m.-8 p.m.
Closed Mon.-Tues.

203 E.
ASHINGTON
o 8-8987
ORTED AND
OMESTIC
RS. WINES &
OCKTAI LS

wf~k~
r_ _ _ _
esr ' s r r ss ' n n 5 5 . .

The world's finest
domestic and
imported wines
at a very
reasonable price.
1321 S.
University
769-1744

midnight

(4

-7

ALL portraits
are FREE

PRETZEL BELL
JAIIL

v'

DINING OUT

0

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