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October 08, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
" r E Friday, October , 1976

Page Five

Cinema Weekend
Friday - King of Marvin Gardens, Aud. 3 MLB, 7,
10:30; Drive, He Said, MLB Aud. 3, 8:45; The French Con-
nection, Aud. A, Angell, 7, 9; Bedazzled, Aud. 4, MLB, 7, 9;
M*A*S*H, Nat. Sci. Aud., 7, 9; African Queen, Old Arch.
Aud.4 7, 9:05; Sword of Doom, Aud. 3, MLB, 8.
Saturday - International House, 7, 10:30, Reefer Mad-
ness, 8:45: Aud. 3,. MLB; The Hired Hand, 7 only and The
Last Movie, 9 only: Aud. 4, MLB; Butch Cassidy and the
Sundance Kid, Nat. Sci. Aud., 7, 9; Amarcord, Aud, A. An-
gell, 7, 9:15; The Philadelphia Story, 7, 9:05, Old Arch. Aud.
Sunday - Umberto D, Old Arch. Aud., 7, 9:05; North
by Northwest, Nat. Sci. Aud, 7, 9:30; Mother and the
Whore, Aud. A Angell, 7:30 only.
Valerie and Her Week of Wonders, MLB 4, 7, 10:30;
Love, MLB 7, 8:45 only.
All weekend-Logan's Run, A Matter of Time, St. Ives,
Seven Beauties, The Movies, Briarwood (769-8780); Obses- I
sion, Fox Village (769-1300); A Woman Under the Influence,
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore, Michigan (665-6290);
Fantasia, State (662-6264); Barry Lyndon, Campus (668-
6416); Sex With A Smile, Fifth Forum (761-9700).

onfess ions

of

an

Eastwood

fian

By STU McCONNELL
I HAVE THIS problem. When
my friends go to the movies,
it's to be enlightened, to be-{
come profound in two hours.
They enjoy the introspective
torment of an Ingmar Bergman
k or the grim humor of a Luis
Bunuel and, like any good pro-
spective intellectual, ,so do ,
My problem is this: I also
like Clint Eastwood movies.'
Eastwood, the star of such ve-
hicles for social thought as For
A Few Dollars More and Two
Mules for Sister Sarah, is actu-
ally a fairly talented actor who
unfortunately has been cast into
a seres of roles - mostly in
Westerns - which require him
to have approximately the same

range of emotions as the Great
Stone Face of Easter Island.,
Occasionally he gets to grunt
or say "yup," but Eastwood
movies tend to concentrate on
action - fistfights, gunfights,
rapes, and theatrical explosions.

shoots frequently and with little
provocation. In a more modest;
era, Eastwood might be the vil-
lain. Why, then, does he com-
mand such an audience?
The answer, I think, lies at
the heart of the American male;

The traditional Western hero, psyche, and was reflected in an
probably, epitomized by John interesting way at the CouzensI
Wayne, is strong but honest; Film Co-Op showing of High:
carries a fast gun but uses it Plains Drifter two weeks ago.I
only when he has to; is rough In the film Eastwood plays aj
and uncultured but has a solid- too-tough outlaw type whose;
citizen side even when cast as gunfighting services are en-
an outlaw; respects women gaged by the faint-hearted,
when they stay in their places; townspeople to defend the town,
and is committed to social or- against a returning band of des-
der - often legally, as a sher- peradoes who have sworn ven-
riff or cavalryman. geance on it.'

reaction is often cheering; in ing but words!",- screams an
this case it was nervous laugh- irate wife in the film after her
ter - nervous because it was husband tries to talk to hert
insincere. about "truth" and "justice."
'HESE WERE Eastwood fans.He is stung by her accusations
ThES WEE Estwod fns.and becomes quite iae h
On an intellectual level, they implico e tirate, the
could accept the idea that rea-: ilcause he o s
son should triumph over vio- guilth because e isnt C out sac-
lence and that women should mg
be the equals of men. But emo- THE EASTWOOD character,
tionally, Eastwood was entitled; neEest syis amantof
to shoot anybody he could get needless to say, is a man of
to t shootiody he few words. He has a directness
away with shooting andI the
women deserved to be raped of speech which tends to strip}
simply because they were wom- away the pretenses of those he'
en. speaks to. "Who's going to give

i

They beckon a part of me which
I have intellectually but not
yet emotionally rejected - the
part known as the male ego.
EXHIBITS
An upcoming exhibition at the
Union Gallery (first floor,
Michigan Union) is the prints'
and drawings of Frank Cassara,
Paul Stewart and Larry Cress-
man, art instructors at the Uni-
versity. It also includes selec-
tions from the works of their
students, and will be on show
from October 19-November 7.
Gallery hours are Tuesday -
Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.,

Newu Black. Rep. to air
The Devil & Otis Redding

IN RECENT YEARS the "so-
cially conscious" Western hero1
has also emerged, epitomized
by Dustin Hoffman in Little Bigi
flan. This hero respects minori-
ties, treats women as equals,
and doesn't even know how to1
use a gun because he is, at
heart, a pacifist. Where Wayne's
heroes voted for Reagan, the
"socially conscious" heroes no7
doubt spent long nights on the!
cattle drive stumping for Udall.1
The Eastwood hero is neither
of these. Ile is mean, exception-

IN THE FIRST half hour of
the film Eastwood manages to
shoot three men and rape one
of the only two women in town.
Strange enough behavior for a
hero, but even stranger was
the reaction of the Couzens au-
dience, composed almost entire-
ly of male college students.
Each act of violence was fol-
lowed by scattered cheers ofj
"Go get 'em, Clint!" and then
by self-conscious laughter.
What had happened was that
the young men in the audience,

High Plains Drifter, like all
Eastwood films, vindicates the
"macho" ethic not by rational
discussion (only the cowering;
townsmen have rational discus-
sions) but by a deliberate pitch
to the emotions and instincts
of men, who have only recent-'
ly begun to come around to the

the signal for the ambush?",
asks one townsman in High
Plains Drifter, nervously await-
ing the bandits. "You are,"
deadpans Eastwood.
The audience laughs as suchi

throwaway lines, but beneath , weekends noon-6 p.m.

the chuckles is that same emo-
tional rapport: "Go get 'em,

idea that strength is not every- Clint." Thus, the attraction of!
thing and that women are peo- Eastwood films lies in the op-
ple. And, as some femnist think- portunity to release a reviled
ers have argued, even that com- but still deeply ingrained feel-
mitment may be little more than ing - the feeling of "macho."!

. . . And, speaking of exhibi-
tions, don't forget to visit the
Slusser Gallery of the School of
Art on North Campus, where
the works of 27 painters from
all over Michigan are -airing

By BILLIE SCOTT ยข
D YNAMIC, delightful, solid
and down to earth are only
a few of the superlatives which
describe the exuberance of
The Devil and Otis Redding, a
play by Ben Caldwell.
Tonight and tomorrow night
at 8 p.m. in the Schorling Au-
ditorium of the School of Edu-
cation, The New Black Reper-
tory will present the play, sub-
titled The King of Soul. For all
the old fans of the late Otis
Redding, the show will be 'a
special treat, and those who
don't know Otis or his story will
enjoy it equally well.
If for no other reason than
the music, this jubilant musical
must be seen and heard. It
boasts a cast of new, young and
very talented actors, singers
and dancers.
MICHAEL DAVIS, in the
title role, turns in an excep-
tional musical performance as
a young black southerner, who
goes from the local church
choir to become a world ac-
claimed musician. Davis' voice,
good looks and natural drama-
tic flair are sure to send him
on the way to the top.
Florence Anthony - Figuera,
the dynamic yong producer,
directs this prodition as well '
as adding her talents as a cast
member. Talk about an all
around women - Figuera is an
alcoholic therapist at Beyh
Hospital in Ypsilanti, as well
as being the fonder of the
New Black Repertory..'
Figuera has cast and molded
some of the best talent in the
you
see
news
happen
call
76mDAILYj
SHEPSKIN
COATS Q
Tapestry
Pipes
JewelryU
ALL 20% OFF
HOUSE OF IMPORTS
320 E.'LIBERTY
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
769-8555
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area. She says that her mo-
tivation has been the need for
"good black theater in the com-
munity, a theater will include!
everyone, especiallyhhigh school
students~ (two of whom are in
the cast, Pam Widling and
Deborah Jackson.)
BERNARD WISEMAN turns
in an excellent performance as
a sinister, wisecracking, soul-
stealing devil, stereotypes and
all.
Figuera describes the play as
a satirical look at how whites
monopolized Otis Redding, his
music and his money and kept
it after he died.

Music for The Devil and Otis
Redding was incor'porated into
the original script by Figuera
and the musical director, San-
dra Cannon. Choreography is
by,'Maria Mitchell. Good solid
supporting performances are
given by the rest of the large
cast.
Innovative staging and mini-
mal props speed up the pace to
add plenty of emotion and en-
tertainment to the one act play.
Asked how she has managed
the show along with her other
duties Figuera responded: "I
couldn't have done it without
my husband or my mother and
especially my husband."

words. That, I thing, is why I al- through the 23rd. It should be
"Words, words, they're noth- ways enjoy Eastwood films. good, so check it out.

FIND A NEW CAR IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS

Good Morning, Ann Arbor
SPECIAL BREAKFAST $1.29
2 EGGS ANY STYLE WITH
SAUSAGES, HAM OR BACON

ally violent, a loner who feels drunk and by lnemselves lat
he owes notiing to society. Hle on a Saturday night, had caught
smokes and drinks copiously, themselves cheerng and were
squirts, and often wears ,black. embarrassed. Che r three mur-
Wayne kisses the heroine, dJoff- d'rs? Cheer a rape scene? How
Man seduces her, but Eastwood base' ITow positively un-liberal.Mt
rapes her. Wayne shoots only In a coinrnerwial theater audi-
in self-defense, H-offnman doesn't ence, where liberal guilt is per- 0
shoot at all, but Eastwood haps less of a problem, the
FRIDAYSl OCTOBER 8 8 P.M.
4"HUMAtiNRIGHTS IN THE PHILIPP;NES"15 Humphrey Bogart & Katherine Hepburn in 1951
PAUL and MARILYN WILSON-former agri-
cultural workers in the Philippines who were
arrested and deported by that government.IT E AFC N QUN
at the The dynamic pairing of Bogart (as a cynical, hard-drinking riverboat cap-
tain) and Hepburn (as a prim, spinster missionary) is only one reason to
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER see this cassic fim. Another is James Agee's great screenplay of the C.S.
921 CHURCH ST. Forester novel. Yet another is John Huston's masterful direction which
Refreshments and informal discussion will keeps three different elements of the story-adventure, romance and
follow the presentation, comedy-in line with the overall theme. Last, but not least, is the lush
jungle color that was filmed on location in Africa. No wonder Bogart won
an Oscar for his role!
SAT: Cary Grant & Katherine Hepburn in THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
FOR JOBS & LOWER PRICES.
UI''fU'I~J A1W CINMA GILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
EECTIN AL.LC EMA7GUIL:D30 &9:30 Admission $1.25
with Gus Hall & Jarvis Tyner
Communist Party Candidates for President and Vice President WILLIAM FRIEDKIN'S 1971
Cobo Hall - 2:30 p.m. - Sun., Oct. 10, 1976C
DOAIN 10Auspices: Michigan HALL TYNER THE RIDKATON:$1.0IEectiCONNECTIONmmtte
Election Campaign Committee
A copy of our report is filed with the Federal Election Commission and is avail-
able for purchase from the Federal Election Commission, Washington, D.C. Gene Hackman puts in an electrifying perfrrmance as Popeye Doyle, a tough
cop with little or no scruples, as long as he gets the job done, Filmed on
location in the seamier parts of New York City, little or no punches are
pulled here. The Quarry is the biggest heroin dealer around, and Hackman
as Popeye is completely believeable. Don't miss the beft chase scene since
Football Saturdays "BULL IT.', Fernando Rey.
CORRECTION: Animation night next week (10-15-76) is
CHILDCARE)experimental, not Hollywood.
21/2-10 year olds C E TONIGHT AT: ANGELL HALL-AUD. "A'
a planned program of fun activities include:
GAMES SNACKS -
FILMS CSTARTS TONIGHT
SQIMARA TA ESHOWS AT 7:00 & 9:00
1289 JEWETT' OPEN 645
(close to Michigan Stadium)
769-4511 ANYTIME
121 s uivrstySTARTS TONIGHT
SWINNER OF FOUR
ACADEMY AWARDS
1-. 'e h' 6-4 SHOWN TONIGHT AT
7.00 ONLY OPEN 6'45

STADIUM RESTAURANT
& PIZZERIA
338 S. STATE
ANN ARBOR 663-4636

n rrr"ww .r srrwr r iw.r . wrr.r r rsrr

NEW FRONTIER RANCH
PRESENTS A
"MIDNITE SPECIAL DISCO"
CABARET STYLE (B.Y.O.B.)
EVERY FRIDAY NITE!
10 P.M.-4 A.M.

Donation: $2.50

Food Available

25 min. from Ann Arbor or Ypsi-EASY DIRECTIONS{
1. 1-94 to Belleville Rd. exit
2, Turn right on to Belleville Rd. which becomes Sumpter
Rd.
3. Continue on Sumpter Rd. for 12 miles to FAY RD.
4. Right on FAY RD. Go miles to New Frontier Ranch.
6474 FAY RD. (313) 587-3410
CARLETON, MICH. 48117 (313) 587-3988

HELD

OVER-

Second Big Week
E ' ' HIG AON-E COMPLETE SHOW
GENE ReOWLAND'S HAUN TONIGHT AT 7:00
OPEN 6:45
GENE ROWLAND'S HAUNTING PERFORMANCE

Tate cNite
'~ungrie ...
are always sated here,
dinner is servedtil 1 a m.
Whether it be a da
main course wth q
salad and fresh vienna
or a lighter snack r.,
hot pizza. You er
Italian cuisine to
Or-just come in -n,:a -
cup of cappuccnoviihm a
touch of somethinice

BURSTYN'S OSCAR-WINNING ROLE

PLUS: ELLEN

Alice is ,b -eS'so[ s 1 - rOQOIK
they're rut i~' yaway Voc,,.hnme -~

I

"- - -w ~ - ' a a a -

U

n -m

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