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October 08, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-08

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Page Two

A'CH1GAN DAILY

___________________________________ II

HUMAN RIGHTS:
A Religious Imperative
PAUL and DEDE WILSON
C h u r c h consultants in the Philippines--
arrested and deported - currently national
church advisor on Human Rights in Asia.
FRIDAY,.OCTOBER 8
NOON LUNCH-Informal discussions-
BBC film on Korea;
"Political Repression--Church Resistance,"
3204 Michigan Union.
3-5 p.m.-Guild House, 802 Monroe discussion.
8:00 p.m.-Ecumenical Campus Center,
921 Church St.
"Human Rights in the Philippines"
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9
Memorial Christian Church, Tappan and Hill,
Workshops led by Paul and Dede Wilson,
10:00 a.m. "The Church Under the Cross,"
and BBC film on religious repression in
Korea.
6:30 p.m.--"Human Rights: Imperative for the
Church"

Sept. p
(Continued from Page 1)
the increase was "somewhat
higher than expected, due large-
ly to a greater than expected
increase in industrial prices."
The statement, issued in Los
Angeles where President Ford
was campaigning, noted that the
wholesale price index has gone
up less than 4 per cent in the
last year and added: "Neverthe-
less the President continues to
believe that the United States
must be vigilant against a re-
surgence of inflation and his
economic policies are designed
to achieve this goal."
DEMOCRATIC , presidential

rice increase reported

Foi

candidate Jimmy Carter, in San
Francisco, cited the wholesale
price report during a meeting
with labor leaders and said the
Ford administration "is the first
in history to give us the high-
est unemployment rate and the
highest inflation rate combined."
He said this is going to be
changed election day.
AFL-CIO President George
Meany said from his Washing-
ton office that "the figures
make a mockery of the Ford
campaign claims that Ameri-
ca's economic problems have
been solved."
Despite the September rise,

wholesale prices over the past
year have risen 3.9 per cent,J
the smallest increase for anyl
12-month period since last No-
vember and a reflection of the
slowdown in the over-all infla-
tion rate.
BUT FORD'S economic advi-
sers have expressed concern in
recent days over the current
sluggishness in the economy
and were braced for more bad'
news as the Labor Department
is scheduled to release the Sep-
tember unemployment statistics
today, and even the most optim-
istic administration advisers do
not expect any substantial in-
roads, if any, into August's 7.9
per cent jobless rate.
Consumers can expect to first
feel the latest spurt in whole-
sale prices at supermarket coun-
ters, since at least part of the
food price increases at the farm

level usually are passed along
to the retail level within a short
time.
The nine-tenths of 1 per cent
rise in wholesale prices last
month was the sharpest jump
since last October when prices
rose 1.1 per cent. It followed a
decline of one-tenth of a per'
cent in August and increases
averaging about three-tenths of
a per cent since MaV.
FARM PRICES last month'
rose 1.9 per cent after declining
nearly 3 per cent the previous
month. Processed foods and
feeds were up five-tenths of a
per cent following declines in
both July and August.
Among farm products, prices
were higher for oil seeds and
raw cotton, fruits and vegeta-
bles, green coffee and cocoa
beans. Prices for live poultry,
eggs and cattle declined.

list
Ar

Friday, October 8, 1976,
rd orders future
of firms joining
ab trade boycott

i
.,
i
i

ANN

A R BOR

Watch for
Special Showing of
1911 SKI EQUIPMENT
& SKI APPAREL
Oct. 16-17

2455 S. STATE

662-7307

.__

-

PROPOSITION 1

CRITICAL- BRIDGES*

A County-Wide Concern.....A County-Wide Solution

Health and Heaing Energy
FRIDAY EVENINGS at CANTERBURY
Astrology: An Analytict
Symbol System"
RALPH DAVIS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8
8 pm. herb tea, 8:30 discussion
218 N. DIVISION STREET
corner of Catherine and Division
Stick it on
I 'the Super 16'

(Continued from Page 1)
RICHARDSON told reporters,
"We don't believe that it would
be appropriate to make the or-'
der retroactive, since the re-
ports that have been filed with
us up to now were filed with
the understanding that they
would be confidential." He said.
Ford will set the dates beyond
which the report will be made
public.
In a statement distributed by
the White House, Ford said, "II
have concluded that this public
disclosure will strengthen exist-
ing policy against the Arab boy-
cott of Israel without jeopardiz-
ing our vital interests in the
Middle East."
"The actions I am directing+
today," he added, "should serve:
as a reaffirmation of our na-
tional policy of opposition to1
boycott actions against nations
friendly to us."
THE MEMORANDUM said,
that disclosure of the report on:
boycott pressures "will enable,
the American public to assess
for itself the nature and impact1
of the Arab boycott and to mon-
itor the conduct of American
companies."
Democrats in Congress ar-
gued, however, that the Fordi
administration had "lobbied in-;
tensively against efforts to make
the names public. Sen. Abra-
ham Ribicoff, (D-Conn.), ac-

cused Ford of "misrepresenta-
tion" of the administration posi-
tion.
A House subcommittee, mean-
while, began polling its mem-
bers to consider whether to re-
lease on its own the names of
companies that Arab countries
have asked in the past to par-
ticipate. The subcommittee got
the names on a confidential
basis after threatening admin-
istration officials with contempt
of Congress.
FORD WAS criticized particu-
larly by authors of another anti-
boycott bill which would have
prohibited U.S. companies from
boycotting Israel and would
have made the reports public.
Currently such a boycott is le-
gal unless it is racially dis-
criminatory or violates anti-
trust laws.
"Either the President was
trying to deceive the American
people last night, or candidate
Ford did not know the policies
of President Ford, one or the
other," said Sen. Adlai Steven-
son; (D-Ill.) He blamed Ford
for the bill's demise in the clos-
ing days of Congress.
The National Association for
Manufacturers, representing
many of the affected compan-
ies, said it supported the con-
gressional provision to make
reports public and has no ob-
jection to Ford's proposal,
which it described as similar.
WE CARRY SELECTIONS OF
IMPORTED FOOD PLUS
MIDDLE EASTERN COOKBOOKS
Falafil-showirma-steak in a sack
egg plant sandwich-ham
sandwich ala falafil-shish ka bob
kift -sweets baklava-borma
homus dip-tabouli salad
and many more
1 block S: of S. University
CARRY OUT
CALL 994-4962
Dinners available any time

...* x 4 ;
..L.
j."-1 *
-..-__. <
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I.,!.,
..- j"., ..
... --' '1 '1

42 Critical-Bridges*
Bridges are the crucial link in our primary
and secondary road system. This November
voters in the county will make a decision
whether or not to improve the Critical-
Bridges at the starred locations on the map.
WhyA Millage
A one-half mill levy for five years is being proposed
because of:
1. Bridge Conditions:
The physical condition of the 42 Critical-
Bridges identified on the map does not meet
today's standards.
2. Declining Available Revenue:
No money presently comes to the Road
Commission from property taxes or the county
General Fund The major source of revenue,
The Michigan Motor Vehicle Highway Fund,
is insufficient to finance both road construc-
tion, road maintenance, and a Critical-Bridge
improvement program.
3. Federal Matching Funds:
Federal allocations are available for bridge
improvements but local dollars must be
provided.
This information has been provided by the Washtenaw
County Road Commission in the public interest.

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every Saturday with Bill Bishop
& our All American Ron Kramer.

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Mich. Daily

1421 HILL

8:30 P.M.

761-1451

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$55

000,SHOOTER UU
50c Discount on Admission
with Student I.D. ON
"ANN ARBOR'S LIVE U
ROCK& ROLL
DANCE BAR"
HOURS: Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.-2 a.m.
WEEKLY HOURS: 9 p.m.-2 a.m.
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OFF- ON ALL OUR.
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The following in Bass footsteps is 100 years of tradition-it's the 100th birth-
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8

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