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September 26, 1976 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1976-09-26

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Page Four

7W C: AA I (U ICAKI MA II V

Ip HL M K JfUtN D LILY Sunday, Septemb4
3UNDAY MAGAZINE LOOKING BA(

er 26, 1976
Kll

THE WEEK IN REVIEW,

Rhodesia reluctance on the part of Smith,'
however, and it remains to be,
seen whether the deal will be
agreement fully realized.
After many long years of in Said the 56-year-old Prime
tense international pressure and Minister: "It was made abun-
stepped-up guerrilla activity, dantly clear to me that as long
Prime Minister Ian Smith of as the present circumstances in
Rhodesia announced Friday that Rhodesia prevailed, we could
he and his government will ac- expect no help or support of
cept a plan for black majority any kind from the free world.
rule in two years. On the contrary, the pressures
on us from the free world would
The proposal, authored and continue to mount."
cemented in large part by Sec-
retary of State Henry Kissing- Additionally, the unique brand
er, also calls for immediate of Kissinger shuttle diplomacy
implementation of a bi-racial paid off and, to be sure, his
regime. The move, which many actions and efforts will go down
believe should have been made as one of his most stunning ac-
long ago, was made with much complishments. The Secretary

of State has blunted, at least winner by a slight margin.
for this moment, the ugly pros- Regardless of which man won
pect of racial war in Rhodesia.o egsrtes de apoe
There is, however, some ques- or lost, the first debate proved
Tion asoweherorotm ithuessomething of an anti-climax,
wilanetotaethe thor not S it one which neither significantly
wi at ewi tebackaltered the standing of the can-
majority in good faith. His un- didates nor reshaped their basic
the past will not be forgotten strategies. One thing it did
by he ativetfrica tand prove was that both candidates
shoulde naivshenaicans, t clearly differ on such things as
place the whole ag reement amnesty, tax reform and the
could be in vain They won't economy. Both candidates, on
could boe tin vain. th ey wn't the whole, also stuck with their
easily forget Smith's determ- respective party platforms and
mned vow that "there wviii be ideology
no black rule in Rhodesia ini
my lifetime." For example, Jimmy Carter
* * * reiterated his vow to pardon all
draft evaders while the Presi-
The d batesdent upheld his disastrous am-
nesty program of 1974-75. Ford
The first of three Presidential advocated a trickle-down theory
debates was held this past on the-reby big business profits
dits called it a draw, despite and stability would be passed
the fact that a poll immediate- Carter tespused increased whv-
ly following the internationally ementspedin.
televised event however show-
ed President Gerald Ford the The next debate, to be held

Oct. 6 in San Francisco, will
focus on international affairs.
There has also been talk of
changing the format of that de-
bate whereby the candidates
will be free to debate each
other face-to-face with rebuttals
and counterarguments instead > ..
of merely responding to the.
questions of the panelists.
HRP members
today
On political matters a little
closer to home, TherDaily re- Carter
ported last week that former
members of the Human Rights Alexander, a former member'
Party - a once strong alter- of the party, "those people who
native to Democratic and Re- had once looked for an alter-
publican demogogery in the city native party were no longer
- have abandoned their third around. It was obvious we had
party and moved into the ranks no support; two-thirds of our
of the Democrats. people had either left town or'
"After '75," commented Bob gone out of politics altogether.

found a certain attraction for
the Democrats.
Such was the case for Bess
Manchester, who was involved
with the HRP's Day Care bal-
lot proposal during the 1975
election. "1 was disgusted and
discouraged with HRP," she
said. She felt that the HRP
members elected to City Coun-
cil were not representative of
the mass of party members.
Perhaps the most appropriate
obituary of the Ann Arbor party
comes from Eric Jackson, one
of two HRP city council mem-
bers in Ypsilanti. "In Ann Ar-
bor politics - both radical and
establishment - there is a cer-
tain element of elite intellectu-
alism. Between any three peo-
ple there's at least two factions.
Ann Arbor HRP got so involved
in ideological disputes that they
lost their roots in the elector-
ate."
This teas prepared by Daily
Co-editor-in-chief Rob Mea-
chU in.

F-ord

So, seeing the writing on the
wall, I left."
Alexander and others see their
role as one of infiltrating the
party and trying to make it
more progressive. Others, how-
ever, were "disgusted" with
the direction of the HRP and

ANN AUUC0 [ELM CC-Cr
TOMORROW IN MLB
A RARE CINEMATIC EVENT
TWO FILMS BY ROBERT BRESSON
PICKPOCKET
7 ONLY
PICKPOCKET is the famous story of the psychological states
of a pickpocket, Michel, who is anonymous and insignificant,
and finally can only find freedom in prison. The cinema's
only "spiritual thriller" was a major influence on Schrader
and Scorsese during the making of TAXI DRIVER.
MOUCHETTE
9 ONLY
In MOUCHETTE, Bresson's union of soul and visual imagry
turns the tragedy of Mouchette into one of the most sublime
experiences in the history of Cinema. Voted among the top
twenty greatest films of all time in the 1972 International
Critics' Poll. French with subtitles.
Custom Prnted
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* Your Team Name in Block or Script Letters,
Up to a Total of 20 Characters.
ORDER-in the lobby of the
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Tuesdays 3-5:00 p.m.
Wednesdays 5-7:00 p.m.
DELIVERY GENERALLY 10 DAYS

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Burgess out

MOSES, by Anthony Bur-
gess. Stonehill Publishing:
New York 190 pp.
By TOM O'CONNELL
IN AN A F T E R W O R D
to Moses, his new epic
poem based on the life of the
biblical prophet, author An-
thony Burgess explains that he
wrote the work as a basis for
a television script. One can be
grateful that the show appear-
ed on Italian rather than Am-
erican television, for the narra-
tive poem which was its bypro-
duct bears all the marks of hav-
ng been hastily written and
unevenly edited.
The epic form tends to mag-
nify the Work's faults. Had he
been writing prose, an author

with Burgess's originality and
linguistic cleverness (both de-
monstrated in previous works
such as M/F and A Clock-
work Orange) might still have
succeeded.
It is only fair to note that
Moses does contain a number
of brilliant passages. Partic-
ularly notable in its brutal im-
agery is the description of the
Passover and the ten plagues
visited upon Egypt, the hor-
ror of which few other works,
least of all the Old Testament,
have ever captured fully. Bur-
gess depicts the Egyptians as a
people bound by religion and
tradition, rather than as a race
of tyrants. Their suffering is
both touching and painful.

II.

Fr-

ti
d
it
u.
in
6:

TUESDAY LUNCH--DISCUSSION dept. 28
"Korea-aught in the Power Struggle"
Speaker: ROY WHANG, Journalist
forrmerly for the
FAR EASTERN ECONOMIC REVIEW
in Hong Kong and Seoul
at the
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 CHURCH ST.
LUNCH-75c 12 NOON
Lunch is prepared and served by
CHURCH WOMEN UNITED OF ANN ARBOR

f his element
Burgess' dialogue, on the oth-
er hand, often tends to be as
stilted as his descriptions are
eloquent. The Bible indicates
that Moses was "a halting
speaker", but in this author's
hands he becomes a character
severely in need of speech
therapy:
"Beware of such. Images.
The reality is that .
We are a. Different animal.
We scent our.
Own Destiny. We must be
free.;
To track it.'
This stultifying pace is ob-
viously impossible to maintain,
and within SO pages Moses in-x
congruously becomes as fluent
as a politician on the Fourth a devoutly religious people, the
of July. Erratic and inconsist- Israelites are instead selfish
ent character development such and rebellious. Their accept-
as this is the rule throughout ance of God is at best tenuous,
the poem. and even then only when con-
The few characters who es- venient. Burgess introduces a
cape this treatment suffer from ' modern problem when some of
being treated in the opposite them eventually become over-
way -they are described with zealous and fanatical in their
distressing consistency. An ex- !religious practice, and find it
ample is the stereotypically, necessary to appoint themselves
evil Dathan, a character so guardians of public morality.
predictably sleazy that he pro- Burgess ability to present
jects a mental picture of an problems like these makes oim
oily villian from a silent movie, wonder why he has so much
FT SHOULD BE MADE clear, . trouble with dialogue and char-
though, that Burgess does acter development. His past
succeed in humanizing many works prove bevond a doubt
rigid and cold Biblical charac- that he is a skillful writer, so
ters (particularly the central the answer cannot be lack of
character.) Herein lies the talent. His problems perhaps
work's main strength. Moses stem from his lack of experi-
is never a stalwart hero: he is ence in the epic form, which
plagred by self-doubt and doubt leads back to the quYestion of
of God, who forces upon him why he chose to use it.
the grudging accentance of his Although Burgess is quick to
leadership of the Israelites extol the benefits of verse nar-
Pharoah is neither cold nor rative in cinematic adaptations,
heartless, but rather a leader his logic of first writing Moses
committed to the old gods and in that form, so that it would
to the survival of Egypt be more suitable to television,
through maintenance of the sta-. is not very convincing. And it
tus quo. "'Does it satisfy you,"' is articularly regrettable in
he asks of Moses, "'to have im- light of the author's occasional
naired, even part destroyed, flashes of brilliance, which
this great Flower of order? Do show that Moses had the poten-
vou wish me to bow down/ To a tial for a masterful work.

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Qod who is an enemy of the
State?"'
Rather than being depicted as

Tom O'Connell is a new
member of the Daily staff.

A

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Black causus grows
WASHINGTON )All - As it caucus which anyone in any
enters its sixth year, the Con- black organization around the
gressional Black Caucus claims country can identify with."
a network of influence far be- S ,, Edward Brooke, (R-
yond the collective clout of its Mass.), the only black person
17 members mnCongress. serving in the Senate, is an as-
The caucus attained nation- sociate caucus member.
al prestige and power because
of its widespread acceptance When the caucus organization
among blacks as a legitimate was made formal in March,
mouthpiece, and the eagerness 1971, its members had no de-
of whites in and out of govern- tailed blueprint beyond their
ment to have some group or intention to come together on
individual designated . as a issues o fconcern to black peo-
spokesman for blacks. Also re- ; ple.
sponsible are a series of inter- "WE WORKED with groups
locking alliances with poli- all over the country trying to
ticians, policymakers and aca- be all things to all black peo-
demicians, both black and ple," said Rep. Louis Stokes,
white. (D-Ohio), the second caucus
AT THE SAME time-the can- chairman.
cus has managed to keep to- After a period of self-evalua-
gether a diverse membership. tion the caucus concluded that
All are black and all are Demo- its emphasis should be placed
crats, but as Rep Charles Diggs less on calling attention to
of Michigan notes: "The caucus problems by holding hearings
covers a pretty good spectrum all over the country and more
of ideology." on the development of a legis-
"There is someone in the lative roeram The unas

This Thursday.. .
MICHIGAN UNION
ACTIAVE Al

pc g .
agreed to try to broaden its. in-
fluence in Congress by seeking
appointments for members to
three key committees: Ways
and Means, Appropriations and
Rliles.
"We are legislators and there-
fore our sphere of influence is
legislative," Stokes said the
caucus realized. "Our job was
to put a black perspective on
any and all legislation."

®I

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