100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Crr.Ln.Cu4uy,.. ..pem~ ':d 70/G rage C' ve

s 0 r^rmrqw

I-riaoy, Jep#ember''/If, 1 10 10

I Ht MIGHIU/\N UAILY

Page seven - I

U': Band suit 'frivolous'

Native Americans
skeptical of trilbute

(Continued from Page 1)
"BLACKS are the last to be
hired and the first to be fired.
It is a cycle that goes on and
on. When lay-offs take place,
instead of going to the person
with the least seniority, why
not offer people long sabbati-
cals?"
Shrugging off the possibility
that the companies may not
be able to afford these prolong-
ed furloughs due to financial,
problems, Hall stated "For ev-
ery dollar in wages, a worker'
produces $3.50."
While Hall said that he op-
posed sex discrimination, he
added also that he opposed the
Equal Rights Amendment
(ERA). "The problem is legali-
ty. Since it is a constitutional
amendment, it supercedes state
law and therefore, those states
who are, in fact, progressive.4
"ALSO IN THE future, it may
be an obstacle to affirmative
action.
"I want to try to find some
formula to do what the ERA
does but which wouldn't undo
what's already been done. We
need a new bill of rights for
women," said Hall.
Hall does not try to equate
U.S. Communism and Soviet
Communism nor does he believe
that Socialism in the U.S. will;

be like Socialist Communism
in Europe.
"THERE ARE no models for
Commimism, It is people who
model a new society. In other
words, it's the people of the
U.S. who will mold Socialism,
in their image. Socialism in the
U.S. will be unique. Of course,
it won't face the problem of a
forced march - it is unneces-
sary, for there is no income
of low base. People in the U.S.
will refuse to accept Socialism
without an equivalent of a Bill
of Rights."
But Hall believes that we do
have a lot to learn from Euro-
pean Socialist ways. He com-
pared workers in the American
auto industry with those in Eu-,
ropean industries. "The Ameri-
can workers have no say in
the factory. But Socialist work-
ers know that they work and
rm it," said Hall. "They know,
it - and that makes the dif-
ference."
Meanwhile, University chief,
attorney Roderick Daane yes-
terday responded to the Young
Liberation League's shit to com-'
nel the Michigan Band to play'
f,> Hall's appearance at Hill
Auditorium tonight. In a brief
filed with the Michigan Court
of Appeals, Daane said the
League's suit was frivolous and

an attempt to grab publicity.
League attorney Alan Kauf-
man, in his own brief, filed for
a "Writ of Mandamus," which

:
't
't
t
.1

would direct the University to (Continued from Page 1) "What they're trying to do
till the band to play for Hall. another "political feather in a now is patch up the bill, plug
Daane said a Writ of Mandam- lot of people's caps." holes through amendments
us depends upon a state offi- . that's going to take forever,"
cial's neglect of a clear duty CONCANNON was referring he continued.
of office. He said that no Uni- to Public Law 174, a bill which Betty Castle, assistant direc-
versity official has a clear duty , would provide free tuition at tor of the Commission on In-
to direct the band to play. state colleges and universities dian Affairs, agreed that the
for qualified Native Americans. flaws Concannon pointed to
"I DON'T THINK the Consti- "It's a piece of shit," said were, indeed, problems. She
tution is denied by allowing the Concannon disgustedly. cited that the one half blood
band to play for one (candi- He said that certain stipula- rule was set because it was
date) and not for another." tions in the bill will severely feared a one-quarter blood rule
Daane said last night. limit its potential benefits. "would never pass."
The suit grew out of Presi- Among these, which Concannon CASTLE ADMITTED that to
dent Ford's appearance in Ann cited are: set up a fund to reimburse col-
Arbor last week, at which the I The requirement that the ges, as the governor recom-!
band played. The League said applicant be of half Native mended, would certainly mean
Hall should have equal access American blood, although the it would be "harder to get
to band accompaniment, but! federal guidelines for maintain- through."
only seven band members voted ing tribal roles are set at one-
quarter. Thus, the state's seven The present compromise ver-
to play for the Communist can- j certifiers must trace through the sion of what was originally
didate. ancestry of every applicant to House Bill 4130, took six years
Capitalizing on the situation, ascertain a new percentage; to get on the books.
Band Director George Cavender "an impossible task," Concan--- --
non maintained.
this week announced that an ,i The requirement that a Na-
"applause meter," part of to- tive American live in Michigan Have a flair for
morrow's half-time show, would j for 18 months to become eligible artistic writinq?
rate support for Hall as well for residency, whereas anyone I if you are interest-
as for Ford and Jimmy Car- . else is required only 12 months d n revie
to establish domicile. Poetry, and music

DRINKING & DANCING
Friday 3-8 p.m.
NO".COVER
All Drinks at Reduced Prices
NEW MENU-NEW POLICIES
beginning Monday, September 27
SCrMeals from
" 99c to $2.75
611 CHURCH !In the lower level of the Campus Arcade) Phone .665-5955

Mediation remains fruitless;
GEO to retreat on issues

(Continued from Page 1)
come about."
Badoud, however, refrained
from making any predictions
about the possibility of an im-
passe. "i'll cross that bridge
when 1 get to it," he said.
"WE'VE DONE a lot of bar-
gaining but we've got too much
to go yet - a lot of time to
cover - and by Thursday I
think I'll have a pretty good
idea of where we'll be at," he
added.
Meanwhile, GEO negotiating

team members hope their new
proposals will inspire some sig-
nificant movement in bargaining
next week. "In some proposals
there are substantial changes,"
indicated GEO spokesman Ran-
dy Earnst.
The adversaries agree that
mediation thus far has yielded
few if any moves toward a set-
tlement.
"TIIERE HAS been some
movement on non-discrimina-
tion - that was nine days ago
and that's about all the pro-

gress we've made as far as
we're concerned," Earnst said.
And a dimmer retrospective
view was provided by Forsyth:
"Right now, today, we are notj
any closer to agreement than
we were when we began me-
diation."
While both sides maintain
they've made proposals in the
past sessions, both contend re-
actions were negative.

CONCANNON called the resi-
dency requirement discrimina-
tory. "It's Indian 'justice' -j
just us. It's rampant in the,
state of Michigan and other
states like South Dakota."
Glenn Friedly, special assist-'
ant to the governor, admitted
the legislation does have "some
problems" but asserted, "It's
a step in the right direction."
Friedly added that the State
Commission on Indian Affairs
is gathering information to draw
up amendments to the bill.
HOWEVER, Concannon charg-
ed, "If they're gonna start deal-
ing realistically with Native
American issues, they have to
have Native American input
from the start."

u rng iea ure
stories a b o u t the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Michigan Daily.

Aollk
WEST SIDE

We are pleased to announce a
FIRST ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION
OPEN HOUSE
for ends and partners
on
SUNDAY, SEPT. 26, 1976
from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Refreshments will be scerved.
PLEASE JOIN US
BOOK SHOP

Visit Our
Old Fashioned
Bike & Toy
1 f Store
Fantastic Selection of
ADULT GAMES-HOBBIES-PARTS
THE STUDENTS FRIENDLY STORE

CAMPUS BIKE ,& IY

514 E. WILLIAM
662-0035

Used & Rare Books Bought & Sold
113 W. LIBERTY ST.

V

HERE in a convenient new
campus shop with NOW footwear
or men and women.
Women's
Bass 00 Camp Moc Men's Banana Split ~"-
Come Celebrate our Grand Opening!.

fI

ZZA o

SAVINGS?

fronJ

Parker'Pen8

regularly
CELLAR
PRICE 14*9

D

visit the U Cellar COURSE
BOOKS Headquarters
upstairs in the Michigan
Union Ballroom-
Mon. Sept.13 thru

Fri. Sept. 17 1:00-5:00
and meet the PARKER
Representative here to
demonstrate our entire
line of practical and
personal PARKER PENS.
Great Selection!!
AND at 50%OFF
all regular list prices!

Grand Opening Specials:
1 MICHI GAN (F-\
I{
--,A-
I E
The Bass/University of Michigan T-shirt
x6.00 value for just $2.99
/L'r
track Pack
$15.00,,.'alue for just $9.95

Our shoes have been "in" on campus
since Grandma and Grandpa were
freshmen, so we know what it's all about
...and what you want. And now we've
put it all together for you in one great
store featuring Bass casuals, including
the famous Bass Weejun*, plus all these
great labels ...
" LEVI'S JEANS
a PUMA * FRYE BOOTS
*ADIDAS * BORT CARLTON
*OLOF DAUGHTERS
FREE during our Grand Opening.
We will be giving away
$300, $200, $100 Savings Bonds.
Come in and register.
aA .f

CELLAR
PRICE

$1.29

iet a Same. gan... Sto in and see!

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan