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September 16, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Africans stop
work inprotest
By AP and Reuter
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Many mixed race
South Africans began boycotting jobs in Cape Town yes-
terday as blacks ended a three-day strike in the Soweto
township of Johannesburg that the Chamber of Commerce
said had seriously hurt business.
A spokesman for the chamber said between 60 and
90 per cent of the 250,000 black workers from segregated
Soweto township stayed away from their jobs during the
strike, which was called to protest killings by police
in South Africa's three-month racial upheaval.
RIOT CONTROL CHIEF Major General David Kriel
said militants who were chasing workers away from rail-
way stations in Soweto had been arrested. No incidents
were reported in Cape Town, where riot police stood
guard at bus and rail stations. i
Kriel said two men died in Soweto during the night.
One was clubbed to death by other Africans and the
other was shot by police after a mob attacked them.
The actions came as U.S. Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger was in Tanzania for a meeting with President
Julius Nyerere at the start of a diplomatic shuttle that
Kissinger hopes willhelpcalm black-white differences in
South Africa, Rhodesia and South-West Africa. The sec-
retary will come to South Africa later in the mission.
THERE WERE CONFLICTING reports over the num-
ber of persons killed in Soweto since the job- boycott was
launched Monday. The World, a leading black newspaper,
reported at least 16 persons killed, all but two by police
gunfire.
Police described the newspaper reports as "nonsense,"
saying three blacks had been killed since Monday, two
by police and a third by fellow blacks
World editor Percy Qoboza charged that there "is a
tremendous effort by police to underplay the situation."
THE TWO-DAY STRIKE in Cape Town on the south-
ern coast appeared to be getting off to a slow start,
possibly because of confusion over when it was to begin.
Pamphlets circulated in bus and rail stations Tuesday
saying it was to be put off from this week until next
week.
Many of the 200,000 "colored" (the official name for
mixed race) workers stayed away from work yesterday
- the first time mixed race people in that area have
joined the protests against the government's racial sepa-
ration policies. Their absences hit the docks, the build-
ing industry, bread and milk deliveries and large manu-
facturers.
However, a spokesman for the Cape Town Chamber
of Commerce said a survey of a cross-section of busi-
ness put over-all attendance rates at between 60 and 80
per cent with 190 per cent turnout in some cases.
"BY AND LARGE, commerce is not seriously affect-
ed," he said. "I suspect some colored workers are treat-
ing it as a sort of a holiday."
The Johannesburg Chamber of Commerce spokesman
said the strike here did have a serious effect, "and if
these boycotts continue it will have a more serious ef-
fect."

REFUSES TO DISCLOSE SOURCE:

'U

II

Schorr risks contempt charge

NOON LUNCHEON
GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
Homemade Soup and Sandwiches 5Oc
Friday, Sept. 17
"HEALTHY PARANOIA"

ice I

By AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON - CBS news
reporter Daniel Schoor yester-
day refused to hand over his
copy of a leaked intelligence
report and was warned he risk-1
ed imprisonment for contempt
of Congress.
Schorr, 60, faced a tense hear-'
ing of the House of Representa-
tives Ethics Committee which
has been trying for six months
to discover who leaked the re-
port on United States spying
operations overseas.
THE CONGRESSIONAL con-
frontation with Schorr over the
rights of the news media to
gather andhpublish news has
been building since Schorr ack-
nowledged he gave a copy of
the House intelligence report to
the Village Voice, a New York
weekly newspaper. The paper
printed the secret report in full.
Schorr declined to answer a
series of direct questions-
whether he got thereport from
a member of the Intelligence
Committee, from the committee
staff, from the Central Intelli-
gence Agency or from any Gov-
ernment agency.
Each time Schorr refused to'
answer, Ethics Committee
Chairman John Flynt read to
the reporter a congressional rule
which provides for witnesses toI
be subject to contempt of Con-
gress if they refuse to answer
questions under oath from a
congressional committee.
"I MUST REFUSE," Schorr
told Flynt. "My rights to with-
hold the sources are protected
by the First Amendment which
is absolutely essential to the
free press of this country."

Schorr's attorney, Joseph Cali-,
fano, said the reporter's refus-
als were consistent with the
1972 refusal of CBS executive
Frank Stanton to give Congress
the unused portions of film
from the CBS documentary,
"The Selling of the Pentagon."
The House subsequently voted
down a motion to cite Stanton
for contempt.
Asked by committee counsel
John Marshall if he had told
Rep. James Stanton, (D-Ohio)
that he obtained the report from
the CIA but would publicly deny
doing so, Schorr said he had
never discussed his sources with
anyone but his wife and Cali-
fano.
SCHORR APPEARED at the
televised Ethics Committee
hearing under a subpoena which
also required him to bring all
copies of his notes pertaining
to the intelligence committee
investigation, his copy of the
final committee report and any
other documents relevant to the
Ethics Committee investigation.
He refused to turn over eith-
er his copy of the report or his
notes, raising the risk of addi-
tional contempt citations. By
the time the committee recess-
ed at noon, Schorr had refused
at eight separate points to an-
swer questions from the panel.
Conviction on a contempt of
Congress citation is punishable
by a maximum of one year in
prison and a $1,000 fine on each
count.
IF THE COMMITTEE recom-
mended that Schorr be cited
for contempt, the issue would
go to the full House for consid-
eration. If the House approved

the citation, the matter would source was a member of Con-

be turned over to the U.S. at-1
torney for action.I
Califano urged the committee
to stick to the basic question, of
whether Schorr would reveal
his source. "The values at stake
are too precious to play 20 ques-
tions with ... to play cat and
mouse with."
Marshall said he had no in-
tention of engaging in a cat
and mouse game. However, he;
said, the investigation is go-
ing into "uncharted waters"!
and it is important that the!
line be drawn carefully to pro-i
tect not only the rights of the
public but also the duties of!
Congress to protect its own re-
ports and material.
SCHORR SPECIFICALLY re-
fused to answer whether his'

gress or a staff person, a mem-
ber of the intelligence commu-
nity or someone in the execu-
tive branch. He also refused to
say when he got the report and
how many copies he made of
it.
Schorr told the committee that
"in some 40 years of practicing
journalism, I have never yield-
ed to a demand for the disclo-
sure of a source that I had
promised to protect. I cannot do
so now."
Six members of the 12-mem-
ber committee told reporters
they would vote against any
move to cite Schorr. Two said
they were leaning against any
contempt action. Seven votes
would be necessary to initiate
any contempt action.

Speaker: MAUREEN O'ROURKE, lesbi
vocate and one of the sponsors of con
on "Healthy Paranoia"

ian o
feren

MAJOR EVEN TS OFFICE
CONCERT SERIES
USHERS
NEW USHERS-Anyone who ushered on a part-time basis
or has never ushered but would like to, come to the meet-
ing at 5:00 p.m. THURSDAY, SEPT. 16.
VETERAN USHERS-Anyone who was a permanent usher
or Security team, come to an organisational meeting at
5:00 p.m. TUESDAY, SEPT. 14. No new ushers will be
signed up at this meeting.
BOTH MEETINGS AT THE
PENDLETON ARTS CENTER

. 0 00 00 - 0
-TONIGHT-
ANTONIONI'S MASTERPIECE
(Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966) AUD. A, 7 & 9
BLOW-UP
Based on a fine short story by Spainard Julio Corazar. A mod
London photographer realizes after the fact that he might
have photographed a murder. The unreality is the basic theme.
Music by Herbie Hancock, plus a sequence with the Yardbirds
with Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. An extremely important film
and the winner of top awards. David Hemmings, Vanessa
Redgrave and Sarah Miles.

2nd floor of Mich. Union

Bring ID

I

If you are interested in ushering,
you attend one of these meetings.

it is very important that

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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Thursday, September 16, 1976
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Alexandro Orfilia, Sec.
Gen. of OAS; on inter-Amer. pro-
grams; 10 a.m.
Regents: Regents Rm., 2:30 p.m.;
Dubuic discussion 4:30 p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 7
Thursday, September 16, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage.
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i 1 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

.Musical Society: Israel Philhar-
monic, Zubin Mehta, conductor; Hill
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Computing Ctr.: films: "Basic Use
of the IBM 029 Keypunch," "Ad-
vanced Use of the 029 IBM Key-
punch," 1024 E. Eng., continuously
7-10 p.m.; "Use of Teletype in MTS,
1500 E Eng., continuously 7-10 p.m.

HERE in a convenient new
campus shop with NOW footwear
for men and women.
Women's Bass 100 Men's Banana Split
Come Celebrate our Grand Opening.

SPECIAL
NEXT WEEK
BILLIARDS
at reduced rates
MON., TUES., WED.
Sept. 20, 21, 22
Michigan Union

f'

U '. llt 4 , t C.rtvRE 5 5P ft "

'1

cORAL - VMOTHER. Of PE3AL.
10$I~VRI TY0"
004. "" a 0t0s*s s s " ..! " " 0 " ! 4 0 000 000. 0s s000! " 0o os k

I'

kywN @ 17 4Ay 6
deerlby .fie&FirttorlQoar
AuCOxklai/5 do$/le,

Grand Opening Specials:
' ~MICHIGAN ;c
The Bass/University of Michigan T-shirt
$6.00 value for just $2.99
F q
'a
track Pack
$15.00 value for just $9.95

Our shoes have been "in" on campus
since Grandma and Grandpa were
freshmen, so we know what it's all about
... and what you want. And now we've
put it all together for you in one great
store featuring Bass casuals, including
the famous Bass Weejun*, plus all these
great labels...
*LEVI'S JEANS
*PUMA "*FRYE BOOTS
*ADIDAS " BORT CARLTON
*OLOF DAUGHTERS
FREE during our Grand Opening.

We will be giving away
$300, $200, $100 Savings Bonds.
Come in and register.
rC02AAe

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