100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 20, 1977

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 20, 1977

ry

THE COLLABORATIVE
Winter Art and'Craft Classes
BATIK
Chinese Brush Painting
Contemporary Quilting
Design with Natural Material
Drawing
Jewelry
Leaded Glass
Macrame and Fiber Baskets
Native American Design

I

JACK NICHOLSON, in
FIVE EASY PIECES
A brilliant character study of a musician with
great promise who gives up a career to work
on an oil rig. A true film of the '70's with Nich-
olson never better as the frustrated and lost
musician. The restaurant scene is already a
classic. With Karen Black and Sally Struthers.
- FRIDAY -
NEXT STOP GREENWICH VILLAGE
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00 & 9:05 Admission: $1.25

/
f~
.N .

Photography I & II
Photo Images
Water Color
Sculpture
Weaving
Woodworking
Contact: U-M Artists
& Craftsmen Guild,
668-7884, 2nd F 1 o o r
Michigan Union

Inflation in 1976
hits our-year low
(Continued from Page 1) Al: hough inflation has moder-
ties and services rose last year, ated, the 4.8 per ;ent increase
but at a slower rate than in last year was.still high by his-
1975. toricalestandards. Rezail price
THE PRICE figures were the increases; averaged about two or
most favorable of the adminis- three per cent a year since
tration's final economic statis- World War II before gaining mo-
tics. mentum in the late 1960s.
The administration previously The slight decline in grocery
reported this month that 1976 Ties litlecomfort fr
ended with an unemployment prices was of little comfort for
rate of 7.8 per cent, which was consumers, as these prices still
higher than predicted, and that remain nearly 52 per cent high-
the nation's economy grew by er than they were five years
6.2 per cent in 1976, which was ago.e
just about what it had forecast. IN A SEPARATE report, the
President Ford's chief econ- Labor Department said the av-
omics adviser, Alan Greenspan, erage workers' paycheck in-
told the congressional Joint creased, two-tenths per cent in
Economic Committee that the purchasing power last month
administration should be given and one-tenth per cent over the
substantial credit for helping last year. This indicated wage
bring down the inflation rate. earners barely held their ground
The administration had set as against inflation, but at least did
a goal reducing inflation to the not fall behind as in 1975.
5-6 per cent range. The seasonally adjusted four-
THE ADMINISTRATION pre- tenths of a per cent rise in con-
dicts consumer prices will con- sumer prices last month com-
tinue rising at about that level pared with increases f three-
this year and in 1978, with nei- tenths. per cent in both October
ther any substantial improve- and November.
ment nor significant accelera- Nonfood prices rose five-tenths
tion. per cent last month.
SSenate Judiciary
SOK's Bell 10-3

AFSCME talks go on
(Continued from Page 1) I ion (UAW Local 2001) to de- tion assuming that the union
extension. I wouldn't want to: certify last summer. is going to be around.
extend it more than two weeks. "I would classify their (the "What hurt UAW was that
Neither side would comment University's) attitude, since they came in with campaign
on the divisive issues but is- the de-certification vote by the promises they had to fulfill ...
sues digcussed included griev- clericals, as cocky and arro- he continued. "The negotiators
ance procedure and discipline gant toward us and other un- were realistic but the member-
policies. ions," said Joel, Block, presi- ship had become unrealistic."
dent of AFSCME Local 1583. Anderson agreed. "I'm at the
NEFF DID indicate, "In '"There's no question there's a table, and I'm saying that we're
non-economic areas I don't general union - busting attitude making progress."
think we're going to have a on the part of the University." AFSCME's current contract
great deal of trouble." was signed in March, 1974 after
Some AFSCME officials ex- NEFF DENIED the Univer- two extensions of negotiations.
pressed reservations about the sity was opposed ,to unioniza- The 'inion struck the Univer-
University's attitude toward tion. "Certainly we don't enter sity for two days in 1971, shut-
unions in the wake of GEO's (negotiations) with the posture ting down food and mainte-
refusal to strike this fall and of breaking the union," he said. nance services and almost
the vote by the Clericals un- "We start from a legal posi- causing a suspension of classes.
Hughes autopsy: Slow death

ANN Auto If [EL4 CC-(III
-TONIGHT-
THE ROBERT ALTMAN FESTIVAL
BEGINS WITH
THAT COLD DAY IN THE PARK

IA -
ANNUAL
SHOE,
AND
BOOT
SALE
NOW IN
PROGRESS
DRASIC
REDUCTIONS
Most Shoes
217S. MAIN
662-6326

I

I

I

(Robert Altman, 1969) 7 & 9-Aud. A
In his first major film. Robert Altman explores the problem of
sexual frustrations. Sandy Dennis gives an excellent performance
as a 32-year-old spinster who, one rainy day, notices a handsome
young man in the park opposite her apartment. She invites him
in, gives him a place to stay and the strange events that follow
alternate between. charm and chills. AND THAT'S NOT ALL
SHOW TIMES ARE 7 & 9' ADMISSION--$1.25
FOLKSI
.
FRIDAY, JAN. 21 in M.L.B.
"BANANA'S"
SATURDAY, JAN. 22 in M.L.B.
"ALL SCREWED UP"

Ad

N46,

PTP
Jauwry
Atfracthom
WHEN YOU
COM/N BACK,
RED RYDER ?
a 2
theatre
TcKets available at PTP Ticket Office
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, Mon.-Frt. 10-1, 2-5
For Information Call 764-0450
*Tickets also available at all HudsonsJ

(Continued from Page 1)
statement by the Rev. Jesse
Jackson, national chairman of
project PUSH, that Carter's
nomination of Bell was "mor-
ally inconsistent" with the can-
didate's campaign promises.
Among the generally liberal
senators voting to approve Bell
were Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.), Birch Bayh (D-Ind.),
and James Abouresk (D-S.D.).
Kennedy said he was "very
much troubled" by the nomi-
nation of Bell, who he said has
"at best, a mixed record in the
area of civil rights."
THE WITNESSES before the
committee yesterday, almost
all of them black, ranged in
their criticism of Bell from
soft - spoken disappointment,
to strident charges of racism.
The Rev. Muhammad Ken-
yatta said confirmation of Bell
by the Senate would be, in ef-
fect. "a battle cry of attack on
black America," and that en-

trusting him with control of the
FBI was comparable to giving
a child an atomic bomb.
"It will be a clarion call to
black Americans to raise some
hell," Kenyatta said, "as a
last alternative."
J A C K S O N said of Carter
that "it is morally inconsistent
to promise us the best and to'
give us Griffin Bell," and
charged the president - elect
with cronyism.
"Griffin Bell, like another fa-
mous bell in this country, has
a crack in him and does not
ring true," he said. "We can
never trust him. This man is
not the best our nation has to
offer."
Bell, 58, was in Atlanta and
did not attend yesterday's hear-
Ine. He has been criticized
primarily for his Fifth Circuit
Court opinions which delayed
racial desegregation in Georgia
and Texas.

HOUS ON (AP) - The doc-,
tor who performed the autop-
sy on Howard Hughes says the.
late millionaire recluse weigh-
ed only 90 to 95 pounds and
had cancer, a peptic ulcer and
kidney disease.
Testimony by Dr. Jack Titus,
a pathologist at Baylor College
of Medicine, was filed yester-
day by deposition with Harris
County Probate Judge Pat Greg-
ory.
A DEPOSITION from Dr. Os-
car Maldonado, an oral surgeon
at Methodist Hospital, said
Hughes had pyorrhea and that
the upper front teeth were com-
pletely destroyed by decay.
The autopsy was performed
by Titus and the pathology staff
at Methodist Hospital on April
6, the day after Hughes died
while being flown from Acapul-
co, Mexico, to Houston for med-
ical treatment. At that time it
was announced only that Hugh-
es died of chronic renal or
kidney disease.
Methodist hospital officials de-
livered the autopsy report to
Gregory in July. Gregory au-
thorized lawyers in the estate
case to see portions of the re-
port but has never released the
document publicly.
GREGORY HAS handled the
Texas phase in probate matters
since April 14, when he appoint-
ed two Hughes relatives, Wil-
liam Lummis, a cousin, and An-
nette Gano Lummis, an aunt,
as temporary administrators of
the estate. On Monday, Gregory
scheduled a Sept. 12 trial for
the determination of Hughes'
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 90
Thursday, January 20, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at thetUniversityof Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor,, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning'during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-i
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

legal residence, the validity of
purported wills, and the deter-
mination of legal heirs.
Titus said he believes Hughes
suffered from kidney disease for
at least 10 years. The deposi-
tion said the left kidney weighed
90 grams and the right 110, com-
pared with a normal weight of
150 to 200 grams.
Titus said in addition to a
peptic ulcer, Hughes was un-
dernourished, had cancer of the
scalp, a "tiny focus of can-
cer" in the prostrate gland, scar
tissue blocking the urinary
tract, and uremic poisoning.
THE PATHOLOGIST said doc-
tors who accompanied Hughes
to Houston told him the billion-
aire recluse had eaten little in
two or three days and was con-
fused during the last 24 hours
of his life.
Titus said that, to him,, this
would mean Hughes might not
have been sure where he was
or able to identify people around
him. When asked if there was
anything in the report to indi-
cate Hughes suffered from hal-
lucinations, Titus said it was
impossible to tell.
Maldonado said the teeth were
in as "poor shape as any I
have seen since I was in train-
ing 15 to 18 years ago."
TITUS SAID the personal phy-
sicians told him Hughes was an
extremely difficult patient and
refused to see a dentist, refused

Hughes
to submit to medical examina-
tion or tests and often embark-
ed on erratic dieting, refusing
to drink fluids or eat much of
anything for periods of time.
The doctors also were quoted
as saying Hughes, on April 4,
seemed to go into shock.
Titus said the drug that caused
the kidney failure was phenace-
tin, an analgesic Hughes be-
gan taking after being injured
in a 1946 plane crash. He said
the personal physicians told him
Hughes was persuaded to stop
taking the drug in 1972.

Riots engulf Egypt

619 E. LIBERTY
662-0266

POETRY READINGS
WITH
MARTHA BERRILL
BOB WALKER
READING FROM THEIR WORK
THURS., JAN. 20-7:30 P.M.
at
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(corner of Oaklond) REFRESHMENTS

(Continued from Page 1)
ment blamed the trouble on
Communist agitators and said
police would maintain order
with force and.firmness.
One government employe
watching a clash called the
Communist charge "a big joke.
The government always ac-
cuses Communists of unrest
while the government is actu-
ally instigating it.' "
At the height of they troubles
yesterday, riot police shooting
American-made tear gas can-
isters and pounding staves on
the ground battled at least 30,-

C 000 protesters.
THE DEMONSTR A T OQR S,
mostly young men, hurled rocks
at police, smashed shop win-
dows and set fire to a number
of police stations and other
buildings. Demonstrators in, the
coastal city of Alexandria burn-
ed a beach house belonging to
Egyptian Vice President Hosni
Mobarak.
In one dramatic incident yes-
terday, a young demonstrator
was shot and apparently killed
when police opened, fire near
Tahir (Liberation) Square in
central Cairo.
Demonstrators rested the dem-
onstrator's body on a ladder and
said they were taking it to the
People's Assembly where an-
nouncement of the increases
caused uproar'on"Monday.
Observers believed the trou-
bles would now quiet down. But
they also felt that the riots -
which saw buildings destroyed,
shops looted and many vehicles
burned - would give the gov-
ernment pause for thought.
Most of Egypt's 40 million peo-
ple live at subsistence level or
below.

MIXED BOWLING'LEAGUES
FORMING
SIGN UP NOW-UNION LANES
OPEN: 11:00 a.m. MON.-SAT.; 1:00 p.m. SUN.
PLAY PINBALL at the UNION
20 MACHINES

0

ART, PRINT POSTER, CALENDAR & BOOK SALE
r *ALL prints & posters 25% off
* ~Large selection of prints 50% off
AlI framed items 25% to 50% off
All 1977 calendars 25% off list
Selected Art, Craft, Architecture books 35% off
Selected remainders marked down to absurd prices,
SALE RUNS THROUGH JANUARY 31
(Note: Does not include custom framing which is
already the best & least expensive in town.)

All too otten, when the party
ends, the trouble begins.
People who shouldn't be
doing anything more active than
going to sleep are driving a car.
Speeding and weaving their way
to death.
Before any of your friends
drive home from your party, make
sure they aren't drunk.
Don't be fooled because they
drank only beer or wine. Beer and
wine can be just as intoxicating as
mixed drinks.

If someone gets too drunk to
drive, drive him yourself. Or call a,
cab. Or offer to let him sleep over.
Maybe your friend won't be
feeling so good on the morning after,
but you're going to feel terrific.

r------------------
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPTY B-1
IBOX 2345 t
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 1
1 I want to keep my friends alive 1
1 for the next party. r I

®i

I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan