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January 18, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-18

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A t &THE MICHIGAN DAILY
rts & Entertainm ent Tuesday, January 18, 1977 Page Five

r
!

Altma
By OWEN GLEIBERMAN
and ANDREW KURTZMAN
FOR THOSE who thought the Winter Term has
nothing better to offer than chemistry labs an
frostbite, UAC has prepared a Robert Altman film
festival of exciting proportions. The festival fea
tures all of Altman's films, including M*A*S*I
and Nashville, plus personal appearances by All
man, ElFiot Gould and an array of Altman's writ
ers; pro eges and critics.
Altman. one of today's most original and contra
versial directors, first achieved critical and finan
cial success with M*A*S*H, his classic anti-wa
comedy. A long-time television director, he forme
his own production company in 1968 and directe
James Caan and Robert Duvall in Countdown. H
was fired for having more than one actor talk oa
screen simultaneously - a technique many critic.
now recognise as one of the most inventive anc
naturalis ic facets of modern cinema. This an
other innovations have brought him much critica
acclaim, but little financial success. Because o
this, Altman has had to operate outside the main
stream of American film.
The festival will be highlighted by the Ann Ar
bor appearance of Altman himself. Elliot Gould
Joan Tewkesbury and Andrew Sarris, who hav
all been connected with Al:man films, will also b
giving lectures. Gould has starred in three Altmar

0
estival
films (M*A*S*H, The Long Goodbye and Calif
nia Split) and made a cameo appearance in Na,
d vile. Gould will be discussing the role of the act
d in cinema.
1- JOAN TEWKESBURY has written screenpl
I for two of Al man's films, Thieves Like Us andt
- mtich acclaimed allegory of American life, Na
- ville. Tewkesbury will discuss the role oft
screen-writer in Altman's films.
- Andrew Sarris one of the most renowned fi
- critics in the country and currently a professor
r cinema at Colombia University, will speak on P.
I man's films and their place in American cinen
d Also appearing will be Alan Rudolph, a scre4
e writer and assistant director on four of Altm
n films. Rudolph, who has recently made his dir
s torial debut in the soon-to-be-released Welcome
d L.A. wil be appearing with a major sneak prev
d of !,is film, open only to students.
1 Other speakers include: Molly Haskell, femin
f and film critic, discussing women's roles in cii
- ma and Altman's films; Tommy Thompson, I
d,1 tion head for Al man's film company, who v
- !'isciiss the producer's role in Altman's films; a
, Elaine Bradish, an Altman production and busin
e consultant.
e
n FILMS TO BE SHOWN (All films are $1.25 ;a

- - ~ - -

U

nce
will be shown at 7 a
unless otherwise no
films: $12):
1-20-77 That Cold D
1-26-77 M*A*S*H at
2-12-77 McCabe and
2-18-77 Images
3-25-77 The Long G
4-1--77 Thieves Like
4-16-77 California Sp
4-20-77 Buffalo Bill
Bull's History Lesson
4-21-77 California S
4-22-77 Buffalo Bill
Bull's History Lesson
SPEAKERS TO AF
Rackham Auditorium
otherwise noted. All
passes for all. speake
2-17-77 Alan Rudolp
Angell A rd A, $3.50)
3-3-77 Andrew Sarri
3-26-7/ Elliot Gould
3-29-77 Molly Haske
4-7-77 Joan Tewkes
4-15--77 Elaine Bra
4-23-77 Robert Altn
$3.50, $2.50, $1.50)

in
te
a
nd
~Is
.
p
la
ll
b
d

From Ba
rwayHRampal
nd 9 p.m. in Angell Aud. A
ed. Season passes for all By JIM STIMSON
ONE NEEDN'T be a flautist.
y in the Park to appreciate Jean-Pierre
d "Brewster McCloud Rampal. His performance is ful-
drsMillerM dly satisfying without great.
Mrs. Miller knowledge on the listener's part.
On the other hand, a flautist-
odbye friend of mine was amazed at
Us the ease with which Rampal
it and Nashville ($1.50) executed diffic6lt passages in
and the Indians, or Sitting his Friday night. concert at
Rackham Auditorium. It seemed
lit and Nashville ($1.50) there was something for every
and the Indians, or Sitting classical music fan at this con-
cert.
SThe show opened with a son-
ata in B minor by Handel. For
PEAR (Speakers will be in this and the Baroque pieces
at 7:30 p.m. for $1.25 unless that followed, harpsichordist
seats are reserve. Season John Steele Ritter aided tre-
rs: $10): mendously in establishing the'
h and Sneak Preview (6:00, neriod mood. Handel's boundless
ontirnism was well captured by
the duo.
($3.50) THE NEXT piece was a son-
ata for solo flute by C.P.E.
ury Bach. It was a work of great
[ish and Tommy Thompson beauty and Rampal renderedtit
tan (Hill Auditorium, tickets . exquisitely. One passage. in the'
opening allegro was formed
arorind repeated notes, and his
chances in embouchure were
Pwless.
Ritter rejoined Ramnal for
co n cert: J.S. Bach's Sonata in E minor.
Te harpsichord was particular-
ly effective in the andante.
whrich featured a serene and
ma ted introductory solo. fol-
lively
lowed by a tense duet, and con-
cl,+ded with the return of the
in and piano with Gustave Ros- onening theme. The created ten-
sels and Wallace Berry. This sion and release would have
acted as a transition piece in pleased Bach himself.
anticipation of the jazz of Jellyt After intermission R i t t e r
Roll Morton. switched to piano, and the duo

roque to modern,
charms Rackham

shifted to modern works. The
first was a passionate andl
forceful Introduction and Rondo
by Kuhlau. Ritter's jarring pi-
ano chords were almost a shock
after his refined 'harpsichord
performance.
A SONATA by Jindrich Feldi
followed, and it proved a most
interesting piece. The first
movement was fast, airy, and
had a strangely comic quality to
it. Rampal ended this movement
with a flourish that brought
spontaneous chuckles from the
audience; for Rampal is a vir-
tuoso possessed of wit and hu-
mor.
Rampal ended the regular pro-
gram wiih a sonata by Poulenc.
Rampal treated the gracious
Ann Arbor audience to not one
but three encores. The first was

the solo from Gluck's opera Or-
pheo and Euridice, a popular
piece in classical flute -reper-
toire.
FOR THE NEXT selection, a
sonata by Albeniz, R it t e r
switched back 'to harpsichord.
His playing had the bouncy
Spanish . flair of Scarlatti, and
overall the piece was fast and
very pretty.
Rampal surprised the audi-
ence by coming out for a third
encore. This final piece was
Fritz Kreisler's "Liebesleid", or
"Love's Sorrow" This sweet
and graceful composition left
the audience sataisfied for the
time - but I'm sure that when
Rampal returns to Ann Arbor
February 25, I'll be wishing I'd
bought my series tickets in ad-
vance again.

> here IS a difference!!
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eSAT

-A-

Faculty

. NATIONAL MED. & DENT. BOARDS
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Flexible Programs and Hours
Over 38 years of experien'ce and success., Small classes. Voluminous
home study materials. Courses that are constantly updated. Centers
open days and weekends all year. Complete tape facilities for review
of class lessons and for use of supplementary materials. Make-ups for

Dizzie Gillespie plays sweetlyd
WEEKEND CONC
Diz
By KEITH TOSOLT S
"WHEN YOU BLOW into a'
trumpet, you don't know'
what's going to come out"
states John Birks "Gillespie -
otherwise known as Dizzy. The
Dizzy Gillespie Quartet was in
town last Friday and Satur-
day for a series of four con-;
certs in the Michigan League
Ballroom.
"I've met all sorts of trum-
pet players in the last 45 years.
The ones who attained a levelF
of professionalism and created
a style, they're the nobility," '
Dizzy said. If anyone knows the
nobility of jazz, it's Diz. He has
played with many jazz greats
such as Cab Calloway, Oscar,
Peterson and Charlie Parker.,
Dizzy was one of the inno-
vators of be-bop jazz in the,
1950's. He plays' a trumpet7
with an unswept bell which
makesrthe sound "softer and
warmer."
"A LOT of musicians can get
hung up on technique," Dizzy
said. But, he adds, technique is
"necessary to do what you
create." A good trumpet play-
er has to know the scales and
be able to hegr a note before
it is played, he claims.
"Sometimes you get some
surprises when you play a
note. But many, many mis-
takes have come ouf beastiful
because the rmusician knows
what he's doing," Dizzy ex-
plains.
"Jazz is based on the Afri-
cans for rhythm and the Euro-
peans for harrnonv, but the
background of our music
leans toward gospel," Dizzy'
says. Gospel was the only tyne
of music the slaves were al-
lowed to play. "Jazz is a direct
evolution of the music in the
fields," he adds.

By SUSAN BARRY I
THE FACULTY of the Musics
School presented a character- a
istically diverse repertoire in a
the fourth of their series of con-
certs - ranging from an early
Baroque piece to some early
jazarrangementsby Jelly Roll
Morton - before a receptive
audience at Rackham Sunday
The concert began with Bach-
ofen's Duo Concertante in F
Major with Ruth Dean Clark
displaying a graceful mastery of
the harp. This lively piece ex-
plored a range and a versatility'
- of sound so rarely presented in
such a difficult instrument. The'
dynamics and rapid glissandos
were skillfully and confidentlyI
executed by Clark and resulted
in the most beautiful and well-
Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG received offering of the even-
during one of his late night jazz performances last weekend. ing. John Mohler achieved a dis-
tinct clarity of tone on the rap-
- E JOYA LE.-idly ascending passages on the
ERTS ENJOYABLE: clarinet which added a satisfy-
ing contribution to the smooth
interplay between harp and clar-
s ti,- iet.
The second piece, Chopin's
Sonata in G Minor for cello and
strings. presented pianist Jo-
D I Z Z Y has no preten- Martin Luther King titled "The seph Gurt with Chopin's charac-
sions about his reason for Brother King". Dizzy is of the teristic rolling chords, which
touring at the age of 59. "I'm Ba'hai faith and explained 1 Gurt handled with confident
trying to work less and get - that he holds the same view of skill.
more. I need that money in my non-violence and admires THE MELANCHOLY beauty
old age," he says. King greatly. of this piece emerged in the po-
Dizzy has picked out a group etic scherzo, in which Jerome
of select arrangers and is giv- After a display of solo jazz Jelinek mastered the unusually
ing each one a composition to musicianship by both Jones high range in the cello with a
be adapted for 100 pieces. le andtBrown, Dizzy finally ask- remarkably smooth resonance.
plans to take these arrange- Iyo knowdwatut2me "Do I The melodious largo had such
ments around the world and yo know what time it is? "a defineable structure it almost
plav with larger orchestras. For his last songs he took the sounded like a contemnorary
T H E O T H E R members mike and sang some blues and love sing Its sheer elegance of
of the Gillespie Quartet are be-hop to end a very good late form was augmented by a
bassist Ben Brown and drum- ght set. graceful blend that achieved the
mer Gram Broker. A fine local jazz group, the gracel bleoha a vf the
Diz7V started off on congas Benson - Drelles Quintent, ap- concert.
for "Barsalona" and later peared before Dizzy's set.! The Chopin was followed by'
picked un his born for a mellow "Our music is a mixture of hFinne's Second Sonata for vio-
mited solo. The next selection jazz types, from fusion and y
ws a very fimnkv tune called modal music to rock and -
"The Land of Milk and Hon- sambas", said Tony Peretz, 1214 s. university
ey", written after a visit to the group's drummer. They
Israel last simmer. plat their original compositions
Dizzy also played a song ded- at the Blind Pig every Wednes-
icated to the pacificism of Dr. day night Theatre Phone 668-6416
. TONIGHT AT 7 and 9
- Open 6:45
GradCoffeeBreak, CLOCKMAKER
-,PHILIPPE NOIRET
BERTRAND TAVERNIER
fo. rd.Afi '. .4iJLUnJJHUJ- I IProf Jq.Al u J'..I

ACU-1 Tournament
for MEN and WOMEN

BOWLING
SAT. JAN. 22
10 a.m.

POCKET
BILLIARDS
SAT. and SUN.
Jan. 22-23-1 2 p.m.

ANN AICI TILM CC-0r
TONIGHT in Auditorium A of Angell Hall
THE DEVILS
(KEN RUSSELL, 19711
A carefully documinted, historically accurate film relating the
political and religious upheaval of 17th-century France and cul-
minating in the execution of a worldly priest, unjustly ,accused
of sorcery by a group of sexually obsessed nuns, led by their
hunchbacked Mother Superior. A highly graphic and explicit work,
it is also one of the most original films of the past decade. Rated
X. "An incredibly ambitious film, filled with the, energy, passion
and imagination that make Ken Russell one of the most impor-
tant filmmakers working today."-New York Times. "THE DEVILS
Is a masterpiece as consumingly rich and as arrogantly original
as the greatest works of art."-Los Angeles Free Press. Oliver
Reed, Vanessa Redgrave.

MICHIGAN UNION

I1

I

missed lessons at our centers.
'Write or calf:
1945 Pauline Blvd.
Ann Arbor 48103 TEST ERAT
662-3149 SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Call Toll Free (outside N.Y. State) 800 - 221-9840
For
-n Affiliated Centers in Major U. S. Cities

OURS

a
Q

Join uh WEDNESDAY, JAN. 19
when the U-M J "ish community
brings you anothir
GRAD HAPPY HOUR,
Popular Mixed Drinks 50c
Cheese and snacks-free
Everyone is Welcome
1429 HILL STREET

I
0
a
Rcl
eD
a<D

I

SHOW TIMES ARE 7 & 9

ADMISSION-$1.25

GROUCHO, CHICO, HARPO, et al. m 1935
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
Verdi's "Trovatore" becomes .n perfect target
for Marx-ish Mayhem at the Met. The Kings
of Madcap Comedy confound the cost and de-
light themselves on an ocean voyage of an
Italian Opera Company. The Fabulous State-
room Scene has becomea byword for controlled
comic -craziness.
WED.: THE BLUE ANGEL
INEMATGUILD TONIGHT AT OL-D ARCH. AUD.
7, 8:30 & 10 Adneion: $1.25

WEDNESDAY, JAN i 17-
"2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY"
THURSDAY, JAN. 20-
"THAT COLD DAY IN THE PARK"
part of the Robert Altman Festival
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
TUESDAY SPECIAL 5 to 10 P.M.
BAR-B-OUEBEFRS
DINNER lNCLUDES:
" Tasty Bar-B-Que Beef Ribs
* Golden French Fried Potatoes
*Large Pretzel Bell Salad with Choice of Dressing'.
0 Steaming Hot Basket of Russian Rye Bread
$3.95 ADULT CHILDREN Under 12-$1.75
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL:
"Home Made Baked Lasagna"
All You Can Eat $3.95
Restaurant
SERVING DINNER 5 T4 10 P.M.
120 E. LIBERTY- 761-1470

WEDNESDAYS
4:00-6:00 p.m.
at
Wesley Lounge
of Wesley Foundation
602 E. Huron at State
(across from Campus Inn)
668-6881

I

IJ

w

Fl

t

--

I

DANCING TO LIVE BANDS

TONIGHT AT 7and 9
Open 6:45
THE'/

R1 ~'" v .'0, .

AT THE
NO COVER
CASUAL DRESS STAuaaToOUNG
-ALSO-
JAZZ

7x
NIGHTS
A WEEK
LADIES NIGHT
TUESDAY &,THURSDAY
High
atop
the

A

F-7

Open 6:45
TONIGHT AT 7:00 & 9:10

IN OUR 1st FLOOR
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