100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, JonEaary 18, 1977

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 18, 1977

Supreme Court stays Texas execution
By AP and Reuter Feb. 16 and that Texas authori- eludes Texas, referred the re- tion ... on an expedited basis,"' television. It would be the firs
The Supreme Court yesterday ties file a response to it by quest to the full court. Marshall said. televised electrocution in U.
postponed the scheduled execu- March 3. Justice Thrgood Marshall, "When human life is at stake, history if any station uses th
tion tomorrow of convicted The action delays for at least while agreeing with the court's such haste is as unseemly as film
Texas murderer Jerry Lane two months Jurek's death in a granting of an execution delay, it is inapproriate." Jurek has said that it execu
Jurek. Texas electric chair - an exe- lasred out at his fellow justices Jurek already has haa one tions wet e shown on television
The justices told Texas offi- cution which may be televised, olahedostg hsfllow dusdice. Juealreadywnay hsnonethe publc "would understa
cials to keep Jurek alive until Jurek last week asked Justic fnlion's highest court. It was his a h pui"l ran
the high court can consider his Lewis Powell Jr. to postpone "I CANNOT COMPREHEND challenge of Texas' death pen- means. This would help every
formal appeal. his execution to allow time for and phatically dissent from, alty law along with similar chal- one understand what the deal
an appeal of his conviction. court's des t m g ther a tht penalty really means. Th
IN AN UNUSUAL move, the Powell, who represents the t e t o nl pei h rt s ae a d help everyone understan
petitioner to prepare his peti- the court used last July to rulewuleynudesa
court ordered that Jurek's at- court in urgent matters from that executions are not neces- more about us here on deal
torneys submit the appeal by the 5th U.S. circuit, which in- sarily cruel and unusual. row."
--- --Jurek's reaction to Gilmore'
1 1'"--------------------------

St
.S.1
he

Fewer professors- working
in research--Overberger

--
ri
n,
nd
ly
.y_
nth
is
'd
nth
;s

t HAPPENINGS.
763-1107

I ! y

Daily
Classifieds

JUREK, A 22-YEAR-OLD na-'
tive of Cuero, Tex., was con-
victed of the 1973 murder of
10-year-old Wendy Adams.
A federal judge, in Texas has
ordered that the state allow his
electrocution to be filmed for

execution was not known. in an
interview before it, Jurek said,
"I will get a stay of execution
and I also know that someday
I'll get out of here. I really
don't think anybody will ever
be executed inybTexas or any-
where else."

By TIMOTHY SCHICK
The number of research proj-
ects at the University has been
stable in recent years, but few-
er professors are undertaking
he work, University Vice Presi-
dent for Research Charles Over-
berger reported yesterday.
Addressing the Senate Advi-
sory, Committee for University
Affairs (SACUA) Overberger re-
iterated remarks made to the
Board of Regents last fall, say-
ing research is the key to the
University's prestige and must
be strengthened to maintain its
reputation.
"THE QUESTION we have to
ask ourselves is "Has the pro-
portion of faculty members with
research projects been going
down?" he said. Overberger
pointed out that. while the total
number of research projects
over the past few years has re-
mained constant, "the number
of professors' doing research has
decreased."
Overberger said one reason
for the decline may be the Uni-
versity's tabulating system,
which "counts" only the senior
researcher even if. several per-
sons are working on a project..
Also, he said, research which
receives no funding from outside
the University is not counted.

sidering inflation you light f'sion of younger and possibly
chink that research had in- more ambitious researchers.
creased considerably," Over- Overberger offered a list of
brger said. nroblems facing research in-
"But," the continued, "If one cluding:
looks at the inflation factor the -Soietal pressures, expect-
money we actually have has ing 'rniversities to be problem-
gradually decreased." solvers:
"The implication if you look -The necessity to balance
at all the factors that go into equality of opportunity and
research is that it has been a standards of performance;
holding or no-growth process." -The accountability of re-
OVERBERGER IS worried search;
that the lack of growth in re- -The effects research may
search will make it harder to have on the community, such as
attract prestigious faculty mem- recombinant DNA research; and
hers - at a time when hiring -Changing social and econ-
freezes have prevented the in- omic trends.
Campus reaction
to exec1ution m1Xed

WELCOME BACK! Hope you
had a nice vacation.

THE ROBERT ALTMAN
FESTIVAL presents.
THAT COLD DAY IN JUNE, Thurs., Jan. 20

I

7 & 9:00, AUD. A in ANGELL HALL

Price: $1.25

Tickets for Robert Altman Festival are available at UAC
Ticket Central
MEDIATRICS ...
On Fri., Jan. 21-Mel Brooks' THE PRO-
DUCERS, 7, 8:30 and 10
On Sat., Jan. 22-DELIVERANCE, 7:30 &
9:30,
Both shows are at the NAT. SCI. AUDITORIUM. Each
show $1.25
Seventeen exciting ways to take your mind off studying
are currently being offered by the U of M ARTISTS and
CRAFTSMEN GUILD. Registration for their Winter term
of classes is now going on. These classes also sponsored
by the University Activities Center and the Michigan
Union, include Batik, Chinese Brush Painting, Contem-
porary Quilting, Design with Natural Materials, Draw-
ing, Jewelry, Leaded Glass, Macrame and Fiber Baskets,
Sculpture, Watercolor, Weaving and Woodworking. The
classes are all taught by professional artists and crafts-
people and cost $24.00 for eight 2 hour sessions. Bro-
chures and Registration information fan be obtained
from the Craftsmen Guild Office: 2nd floor of the Mich-
igan Union, 668-7884.
UAC needs 2 work-study people, one to work
in the print shop and one to work as a secre-
tary's aide. Call 763-1107.

What Would You Give To
TRIPLE YOUR READING SPEED?
If you're getting behind in your studies and need a speed
reading course, but you can't afford the cost, then I've got
something for you.
It's a simple new way of helping you learn tested and proven
speed reading techn ques found in the most famous reading
programs at a fraction of their cost.
I taught speed reading for abot five years, and watched the
price go up from $150 to $400. That is a major expenditure,
and I think that I can help people learn those same tech-
niques for a lot less money.
So, I've put together a speed reading and study effectiveness
course called Reading Effectiveness Training andI'm ooffering
it at an introductory price of $26.95.
This price includes classroom instruction, a 140-page reading
manual, a cassette tape of reading instructions, and a cassette
of reading drills that will help you push up your reading
speed and increase ycur reading comprehension.
Don't let the low price fool you. Most students double their
reading speed within one class session, and many are reading
close to a thousand words per minute within a week, with
regular practice.
But the course goes beyond reading speed. It shows you a
whole new way to organize your learning. You learn to put
your notes from a whole chapter or even an entire book on
one piece of paper. You learn to integrate your class and
reading notes on a single page of your notebook. Studying
for a test or writing a paper is easy with all your notes on
one page.
You also learn a multiple study process with your speed
reading skills that wvl cut your study time and free you to
do your own thii
It doesn't wor for everything. I couldn't use it in Statistics
or math classes, but it is great for almnost anything else.
I'd really like to see these techniques go to work for you.
Give me a call today and lets work something out. I'm Leon
Soderquistro fSoderquist Associates.
SODERQUIST ASSOCIATES
1568 South 1100 East Room 2
Salt Lake City, UT 84105
Dr. Soderquist, please let me try your Reading Effectiveness
Training Course for 15 days. If I am not satisfied that it
will do what you claim, I will return your material within
that time for a full refund. On that basis, here is my
$26.95.
NAME
ADDRES
ClTY _

I

it
You
see
news
happen
callI

S(ontinu(
omore, said,
it should b
choice. to die
BARBARA
ate student
uatestudent
Business Adr
much stronge
he got it, he

Led from Page 1) A WOMAN WHO refused to A
"But I don't think narfied shared Johnston's view
e the . prisoner's of capital punishment but said,
"I 'hink the State of Utah sucks.
YOUTZ, a grad- I can't believe they did it. I
in the School of was hoping when I woke up this
in the School of morning that they would have
ninistration, took a postponed it or cancelled it.
er stand. "I'm glad What is the world coming to, I
deserved it," she really wonder."

I

ANOTHER problem facing re-
search is the lack of increases
76-DAILYin outside funding. "If you just
look at the dollar increases (in
research funding) without con-
SIT ON IT!
Yes! Any Interested Student may
sit on the following committees:
STUDENT RELATIONS
BUDGET PRIORITIES
UNIVERSITY CELLAR BOARD
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
BUDGET STEERING COMMITTEE
ELECTIONS DIRECTOR
Michigan Student Assembly Committees:
TREASURER
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS BOARD
PERSONAL COMMITTEE
INSURANCE COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS IN MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
OFFICE, ROOM 3909 MICHIGAN UNION
APPLICATION DEADLINE 5:00 P.M.
THURSDAY, JAN. 20, 1977

said.
A n o t h e r sophomore, Sue
Johnston, took an opposing view,
". . I don't believe in capital
punishment," she said, "but the
way the government is set up,
when they decide the execution
date and don't go through with
it in a certain period, they have
to let the person go."
"That's not right either," she
added.

Several students said they
were disturbed by the publicity
the case had received. Gradu-
ate student Jerry Breuer said
Gilmore "made a mockery of
the entire affair."
"There was too much publi-
city," Holden said, "He'll prob-
ably go down in history just for
that."

Exile claims U.S.
too lax on USSR

I

STAT

'F

71 P

C -4- 1r.

mom"

(Continued from Page 1)
USSR and around the world.
Amalrik's own st r ug gIe'
against the internal policies of
the Soviet regime span a decade
and led to his expulsion from
the USSR last April. .
Moscow University expelled
Amalrik in 1965 for writing a
politically unacceptable paper
on the origin of the medieval
Russian state.
OU*T OF SCHOOL and unable
to land a job Amalrik was con-
victed for economic "parasit-
ism" and sent into Siberian ex-
ile.
This experience provided the
basis for his first book, Involun-
tary Journey to Siberia. This
work was quickly followed by
his best known effort, Will the
Soviet Union Survive Until 1984?
Both were published in the
west in 1970 which led to Amal-
rik's conviction on charges of
"defaming the Soviet State." He

According to Amalrik, how-
over, this type of policy works
only temporarily - only until
the blarkmailer decides to its
demands.
"I don't want to be known as
a person who smnoorts the cold
war," he said. "But coonerating
with Communist countries does-
n't necessarily preclude resist-
ing them, and resisting them
doesn't preclude cooperation,"
he explained.
AMALRIK HIT President-elect
Carter's camnaign statement
that he wouldn't intervene, in
the event of a Soviet invasion
rof Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia, al-
though Communist, in indepen-
dent of the U.S.S.R. "Soviet
leaders will look on this as an
invitation to Yugoslavia," he
said.
Within the Soviet Union, the
"democratic forces" are very
weak, according to Amalrik. He
attributed this to Russia's lack
of a democratic tradition.
"The Russian people simply
don't knoy what democracy
is," he said.

For More Information Call: 763-3241

served five years in
Asian prison camp,
release in 1975.

an East
obtaining

,f

HE NOW LIVES in the Neth-
erlands with his wife, Gyusel, a
painter.
In "1'984", Amalrik predicted
the imminent destruction of the
Soviet Union as a resilt of a
cataclvsmic war with China.
Amalrik's talk was sharply,
critical of the entire history of
U.S. policy toward the USSR.
He especially attacked the cur-
rent Ford-Kissinger policy of
detente:
"THE RELATIONSHIP of de-
tente is like the relationship of
a shon-keeper and a gangster,"
he said. "The shopkeeper gives
the gangster a little something
to keep things quiet. The hood
takes this in money, in credits,
or maybe in grain," he con-
tinued, referring to various
forms of U.S. trade and assist-
ance to the Soviets.

FOR THIS REASON, Amal-
rik contended that democracy
will have to be imposed from
t without in order to take root.
The U.S. should attempt to do

this. but shouldn't expect quick
resilts, he added.
Despite its lack of democrat-
ic traditions, however, Soviet
society is permeated vith dis-
satisfaction, Amalrik said.
"From the bottom, this dissat-
isfaction has taken the form of
sabotage, missed work and even
small insurrections," he stated.
"If this dissatisfaction in the
working class could join with
the democratic movement of
the intellectuals, this could pre-
sent a great threat to,the So-
viet regime," he continued.
- That is exactly what Amal-
rik hopes to see. In his view,
the alternative is a catastrophic
war with China that would ac-
complish the same goal, but at
a terrible human price.

YI ROIi BRPM IM'?.1IA111 Lll ll i+ YI R. _;. _.. x.. ' ,

U

T

1

I

WIQB and DAVE ALAN
Are Proud To Present

-

AN EVENING WITH

-

JEAN-LUC-PONTY
Saturday, Feb. 19th at Midnight
at the Michigan Theater
603 E. LIBERTY

Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558
TIE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LNXXVII, No. 88
Tuesday, .Iainuary 18, 1977
is edited and managed by students

MY/.. a . r \ w Unit ci tate CAPzAPresr

I

I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan