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January 16, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-16

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday January 16, 1977

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, January 16, '1977

CAMPNU.AGAMON
FOR BOYS
Northern Wisconsin
Boys Camp seeks fully-
qualified applicants for
summer employment.
POSITIONS OPEN:
Waterfront Director, T r i p
Program Assistant, Bicycle
Trip L e a d e r, Campcraft,
S a i l i n g, Photography and
Archery Instructors, Regis-
tered Nurse.
Interviews in
Ann Arbor--Feb. 1 & 2
Call 764-6951 for info.

The Transcendentalist Move-
ment was strongly influenced
by the writings of James
Marsh, philosopher and educa-
tional reformer, 1794-1842.
JACK WHITE
WILL BE AT THE
UNION
Feb. 7th
Who 'is Jack White?

I

r'
s

HOUSING DIV

Nomination of new
CIA chief periled
(Continued from Page 1) during government service. He
tice that had always existed did donate that to the Kennedy
with respect to White House Library and he did take a tax
papers." deduction, which the law en-
HE ALSO SAID the papers in titled him to do at the time."
question went not to the Na-
tional Archives in Washington AS FOR LEAKING classified
but to the Kennedy Library in information to reporters, Alcott
Massachusetts. said, "Anything he did in that
"Everything was done in the regard was under specific di-
bright light of day," Alcott rection of the president."
said. In other news, meanwhile,
"He did make a donation of Carter said he will try to make
papers which were his property his inaugural message Thurs-
but which were accumulated day "mercifully brief."
- - ____ - "It's probably one of the short-
_________ ___________ est ever given," Carter said,
adding that it will take no more
than 15 minutes to deliver.
THE CARTER press office
made but one announcement
yesterday - that David Aaron
will hold the title of deputy as-
n Forms sistant to the President for na-
tional security affairs. Aaron,
who was a senior member of
Year the National Security Council
staff from 1972 to 1974 when he
became an adviser to Vice
Y 17,' 1977 President-elect Walter Mondale,
15f S ABwill be the chief deputy of Zbig-
E-1500 SAB niew Brzezinski, Carter's assist-
ant for national security af-
r, Assistant Resi- fairs. "4 A
' Also, Eileen Shanahan, a 14-
brarian, Resident year veteran of covering na-
tudent Teaching tional economic policy for The
New York Times, said last night
she will become assistant sec-
retary for public affairs in the
inimum of 55 credit Department of Health, Educa-
e Resident Fellows intion and Welfare (HEW). '
RFShanahan previously worked
Counselor positions; for the Journal of Commerce
ssistant in Pilot Pro- and in the office of public af-
ver, qualified under- fairs at the Treasury Depart-
ment early in the Kennedy ad-
e Resident Director ministation

ROSident Staff Applicatio
For 1977-78 Academic
AVAILABLE STARTING JANUAR
IN MS. CHARLENE COA DY'S OFFI(
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director
dent Director, Resident Advisor, Head Lii
Fellow, CULS Counselor and Graduate S
Assistant.
Advisory positions require the completion of a m
hours by the end of the 1977 Winter term for the
Residential College, Resident Advisor and CULS
Graduate status for Graduate Student Teaching A
gram and the Resident Directors position. Howev
graduate applicants may be considered for th
positions.t
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U.c
Ann Arbor Campus during the period of employm
completed a minimum of 55 credit hours by th
Winter Term. (3) Preference will be given toc
lived in residence halls at University level for at
Undergraduate applicants must have a 2.5 cur
average and graduate applicants must be in goodc
the end of the 1976 Fall term. (5) Preference is
whq do not intend to carry heavy academic sched
have rigorous outside commitments. (6) Applican
not be considered. (7) Proof of these qualificatio

V N-',r P /Ua/Uw U/g.F

(Continued from Page!2) S
ed Democrat said he did not
have the authority.
Utah law allows the governor
to grant a stay until the next
scheduled meeting of the Board
of Pardons. Matheson's prede-
cessor, Calvin Rampton, issued
such a stay and the pardons
board refused to commute the
sentence.
"I BELIEVE THE sta-
tute. means the stay of execu-
tion is a one-time opportunity,"
Matheson said.
Some 25 miles north of the
state prison here, a criminol-
ogist, a state senator and op-
ponents to the death penalty ad-
dressed a rally of about 150
people at the State Office Build-
ing.
MORE THAN A dozen relig-
ious leaders were scheduled to
arrive on Sunday for services
and an all-night vigil and pro-
test at the prison.
News representatives clam-
mored for details about Gil-
more's death at a press con-
ference yesterday but Warden
Samuel Smith refused nearly
all details because of security
reasons.
"CAN YOU GIVE me the
approximate time," asked one
television representative, "be-
cause we have the network to
worry about."
Legally, the execution by a
five-member firing squad has
been set for exactly sunrise,
which is at 7:49 a.m. But War-
den Smith would sav only that
the execution would be bet:0
tween 7:30 and 8:00 a.m.
He was cooperative with the
press but told reporters: "I
think it (press coverage) has
made a hero out of Gilmore
and I resent that."
T R AN S M 16S S I G N
van$ to relay the news of the
execution nationwide havebeen
set up in the prison parking lot

Judge denies stay
of f lmnre s rde th

ed to witness the shooting.
During the night before the!
execution the prison plans to
provide hourly advisories on1
Gilmore'shmental and physical
condition.
Gilmore was descvribed by
prison officials and his attor-
ney, Ronald Stanger, as calm
and "without change or weak-
ening" of his decision not to
oppose his execution.
GILMORE, who was:
convicted of killing a Provo,
Utah, motel clerk Bennie Bush-
nell during a summer robbery,
visited with family members
and attorneys and told prison
authorities he had changed his!
mind about wanting "a six-
pack of Coors beer" for his
last meal.
Lt. Ersel Fagan, who is in
charge of the prison's maxi-
mum security section, said
yesterday the 36 - year - old
slayer had canceled his beer
request and asked to be served
the regular prison meal to-
night.
WARDEN SM IT H'
said there would be a gener-
al lockup of the other inmates
at Point of the Mountain Prison
during the execution. Utah
Highway Patrol Superinten-
dent Col. Robert Reid said se-
curity would be tight around
the 1,000 acre site.
Reid said scores of officers
would patrol a nearby freeway
and the prison grounds would
be sealed off after the veritable
army of reporters assigned to
cover the execution was al-
lowed inside the gates.
He said there had been
threats "against people in-i
1volved in the execution" and'
K9 Corps dogs would be on
hand and his men would be
armed with riot shotguns.
"We have enough men toi
handle it if it gets violent,"

Capital punishment:I
Legalized murder
AN EDITORIAL
WHEN is the taking of a human life with malice
and forethought, whoever the executioner,
anything less than cold-blooded murder?
This is the question everyone should ask them-
selves tomorrow at sunrise when convicted mur-
derer Gary Gilmore is shot to death by five Utah
citizens - the first state - ordered execution in
this country in 10 years.
When the Supreme Court gave t he states the
right to play God by upholding the death penal-
ty this summer, it created a time bomb
that the state of Utah is about to set off. Gilmore's
execution might well be the start of a nationwide
pogrom of death row inmates who have been lan-
guishing in hell holes across the country, never
certain of their future, while the courts debated
the legality of capital punishment.
THE LEGAL question has finally been decided,
but the moral question remains: when is the tak-
ing of a human life not murder?
Proponents of capital punishment cite two
principle arguments for their cause-it acts as a
deterrent to murder for potential killers will think
twice if they know they may have to pay for the
crime with their own lives, and that it prevents
convicted killers from serving their time, then get-
ting out and doing it all over .again.
The problem with both of these arguments is
that as reasonable as they seem on paper, they
simply don't bear out in real life. Numerous
studies have" been condicted over the years com-
paring the murder rates of states with capital
punishment to those without, and none have con-
cuded that it is an effective deterrent. Most per-
sons who commit murder do so in a moment of
uncontrollable anger or passion because a weapon
is handy. As a result they are unlikely to pause
to consider the consequences of the act. The threat
of their own death simply won't occur to them.
THE RECIDIVISM ARGUMENT, as a justifi-
cation for capital punishment, has also been re-
futed by available evidence. Murderers have been
proven the least likely of all criminal to repeat
their crimes. Again, the reason lies in the circum-
stances under which most murders are commit-
ted. Unlike robberies, which are usually planned
ahead of time, most murders are committed in a
heated, irrational moment, with little or no pre-
meditation. And sonce such a moment is unlikely
to arise again, murderers rarely repeat their crime.
Then why is there such a concerted effort to
return to capital punishment? The only reason
that remains is retribution - "an eye for an
eye . . .". It is the emotional excuse that overrides
all sense of logic and reason. The public is so out-
raged by a crime that the only way it can deal
with it is by destroying the criminal.
The life or death ofGilmore is not the real'
Issue here. Gilmore has asked to die, and has tried
to commit suicide 'several times. Still, the ques-
tion is whether any government has the right to
take a person's life as punishment. The answer
is an emphatic, no.
We look to the law as the protector of the
people, and as the upholder of ideals, but what
ideal is more sacred or more dear than that of
human life? And, just who will the law be pro-
tecting by executing Gilmore and hundreds of
others like him?

of M. student on the
nent. (2) Must have
he end of the 1977
applicants who have
least one year. (4)
nulative grade point
academic standing at
s given to applicants
ules and who do not
its with children will
ns may be required.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII No. 87
Sunday, January 16, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phlae 164-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a iily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscriptions
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mall outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session 'published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $8.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

but no newsmen will be allow- Reid said.

THE CENTER FOR
RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES
IS SPONSORING

,'1

Present staff and other individuals who have an application on file
must come to the Housing Office to complete a new application form.

DEADLINE FOR
APPLICATION:

Reapplying Staff--Jan. 21, 1977
New Applicants-Jan. 28, 1977

DR. PAUL C. USLAN
OPTOMETRIST
Eye Examinations
Full Contact Lens Service
Cold Sterlization for
Soft Lenses
545 CHURCH ST.
769-1222

,A PUBLIC LECTURE
BY
EXILED SOVIET DISSIDENT
ANDRE I AMALRIKi.
"Detente and the Soviet
Dissident Mcvement"
MONDAY, JANUARY 17
7:00 P.M., RACKHAM AUD.

A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

1..

J

II

In the time it takes to drive
your friend home, you could save
his life._

for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes. Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend
3,... 'l, 0ai ln iv e. n't+tin

rDRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y*
1 BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYTAND 20852 1
.I w ant tn osve a friend's life. I

II

If your friend's been drinking

I

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