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April 01, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, April 1, 1977

I HL MIC:HlbAN DAILY

Page Seven

Friday, April 1,1977 I hIL MI(JHl(iAN DAILY Page Seven

5i

UGLI:

A

hot nigh
different floors in the librar

i
Y

A COLLEGE RING.*
It's a symbol for life

(Continued from Page 1)

fided.

Everytime you walk down
the aisle, everybody looks up,"1
commented Christine Czarnec-
ki, an engineering freshwoman.
"It's like you're on parade."
"PEOPLE WOULD tell you
if you go to the UGLI, it's like
a meat market," said Czarnec-
ki.
"You look" at the women,
said Bruce Patterson, an Edu-
cation junior staked out in the
basement. "But, I never picked
anyone up."
"My roommate used to say
the library was a good place}
to meet girls. They don't have
their guard up," Patterson con-
. " ' ' '"

WORKING BEHIND the acquire different reputations,,
check-out desks in the lobby, l and the check-out employe
library employes are able to' substantiated this hearsay.
view the goings-on, in the lob- The main floor is "basicallyl
by. a working floor," he said. Stu-
"You see everything from dents stop in to use the index
near fist-fights to mad pas- catalogues, catch a quick re-
sionate love scenes," said one I serve reading and lounge in the
employe who wished to remain back where they can listen to
anonymous. the radio music emanating
The staff has been known from the reserve desk.
to make bets on the outcome of "People go cruising in the
trysts that take place in the basement," one library veter-
lobby. "Will they leave in I an noted. Activity in the base-
tears or will they leave hap- ment focuses on the windowless
pily united?" the employe and smoke-filled lounge where
quipped. candy machines and lounge
STUDENT LORE has it that chairs attract those craving
study breaks and conversation.
Noi=THE CHATTER and chuckles
carry over to study areas, fill-
Romance Lnnuones ed with many students intent

t-spot
noise. "If you come here with
the intention of studying, you
can study," said Donn Mans-
field, an LSA sophomore con-
tent in his carrel.
One library regular, who is
"easily distracted," has found
a way to cope with the back-
ground buzz. LSA senior Ei-
leen Murphy uses earplugs to
block out any clamor. -
"CO M P L E T E silence
can kind of bug you," observ-
ed Blair Hysni, a business ad-
ministration student who that
night alone had run into sever-
al friends sitting in a row of
desks, and chatted with each.
UGLI shenanigans, however,k
occasionally go beyond the us-
ual kaffeeklutsch of friends
who congregate in the lounge.
Once in a while, it's not unus-
ual to see late night studiersI

Wheeler, Belcher
meet in last debate

th,
tw
el

(Continued from Page 1) area by allowing people to ride
he debate, the final meeting be- the bus rather than use cars,
ween the candidates before the he said.
lection. Belcher has suggested includ-
ing doubledecker buses or a
WHEELER TOLD the 100 per- trolley in the downtown transit

sons gathered, mostly students,
that he and Belcher are request-
ing that their campaign work-
ers and supporters refrain from
"abusing each other" (verbally)
during the final days of the
campaign.
Although both candidates had
vowed early in the race to "run
a campaign based on the is-
sues," the past three weeks
have been filled with unsigned
campaign literature and accusa-
tions from both sides.
Belcher received thundering
applause from the audience
when he admitted he had been
wrong in opposing the city's fiveI
dollar marijuana fine.

} .,

The Dnntment of

THURSDAY-MARCH 31
FRIDAY-APRIL 1
TIME: 1 1 :00 to 4:00

Announces an
INFORMATION MEETING
for SUMMER STUDY in
SPAIN and FRANCE
MONDAY, APRIL 4-7:30 P.M.
4th FLOOR COMMONS-MLB
Program Details and Travel Information
Will Be Discussed.
SLIDES SHOWN-REFRESHMENTS SERVED
For Further Information:
DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES
764-5344 4108 MLB

away from stereos, televisions send out for a pizza.
and other dormitory distrac-
tions. Georgia Tech plays its first
But these diligent scholars four football games under:
don't seem bothered by the lights this season. t -

Cops aw
(Continued froi Page 1)
ed by state police for toking,
they'll have to worry about a!
possible one year imprisonment!
and a $500 fine - instead of
Ann Arbor's five dollar slap-on-
the-hand. State law, which clas-
sifies smoking dope as a high
court misdemeanor. supercedes'
the city's five dollar misde-
meanor ordinance.
University security personnel
will also pitch in to discourage
Hash Bash happenings, accord-,
ing to Fredrick Davids, Direc-
tor of Safety. Security doesn't

AI WAS wrong three years
ago, I'm willing to admit it
altBa h now" he said.
W ~After congratulating his op-1
aponenton his changed position, '
want "a recurrence of the drink- Wheeler retorted. "He's three'
ing'and mess we had last year," years behind on this one, he'll
he said.I probably be three to five years
DAVIDS is particularly con- behind on other things."
cerned with keeping parking Belcher reiterated his pre-
areas and campus buildings vious stand on city mass tran-
clear of unwanted visitors andl sit calling for cutbacks in the!
disruptions. Dial-a-Ride system and in-
' Lat yar uly cene leel-creases in the number of line
oped when visitors illegallyburots
parked their cars in staff park- HE ALSO proposed a "down-
ing areas. Many people were town loop" bus which would run
stuck when these cars jammed from the central business dis-
the lots and many automobiles trict to campus and back. This
were towed away, Davids com- system would alleviate some ofI
mented. the congestion in our downtown

on serious study, hoping to getj

system. If people are going to
use it, he said, "the system has
to have pizzazz".
Wheeler has opposed elimina-
tion of the Dial-a-Ride service,
calling for greater efficiency in
the current transportation sys-
tem. Although he favors a down-
town loop route, he called Bel-
cher's doubledecker bus idea
"unrealistic and frivolous."
HE ALSO SAID he had not
failed to keep his 1975 cam-
paign promise to institute rent
control in Ann Arbor.
"I opposed making it part of
the city charter, but I did get
data on implementing it (rent
control)," he said. "The com-
mittee which studied it didn't
recommend rent control."
Wheeler added that if re-elect-
ed, he would ask the committee
to institute partial rent control
in certain portions of the city,
particularly the densely popu-
lated student areas.
Belcher has continually op-
posed any form of rent control.
"The only way we're. going .to
make rents stabilize is to make
(the market) competitive,", he
said.
He proposes bringing in high
rise apartment buildings to
help relieve the housing crunch.
During the California Gold
Rush, the 49ers spent up to $2
for one onion and $3 for one egg.

MICHIGAN UNION--Main Lobby
ORDER ON RING DAY AND
SAVE !

I

I

I I /IIf11 Apl l lo l si lu I iFi/1 4/i iir gl grl e ll

i

U

GREENSHIELDS
A member of a national feminist or-
ganization who speaks out against the
maintenance of drug laws and other
victimless crime laws.
We Students Need
GREENSHIELDS
FOR
2nd Ward City Council

April 4th

Libertarion
PD. POL. ADV.

--

1!

IU

F
i
t
M'
I o
E
r

i

Lou Belcher in a moment of quiet solitude at Dolph
Park. Lou was instrumental in helping to pass the en-
vironmental protection site plan for Dolph Park.
The Issue:

Ann Arbor's environment and general quality of life
has always been important to all of us. It is one of our
treasured resources and must be carefully protected.
A developing problem is what to do with our garbage
and trash now that burying it has become increasingly
expensive.
Mayor Pro-Tem
Lou Belcher's stand:
I have worked with City and County officials to defeat
the Detroit super sewer and to support our new sew-
age treatment plant. This new plant will put better
quality effluent back into the Huron River than we
take out. On other environmental issues I have:
" Sponsored and voted yes (Mayor Wheeler voted
no) for a resolution creating a committee to study
the feasibility of a new Solid Waste Disposal and
Energy Recovery System. Dec. 6, 1976
Sponsored a resolution to plan and develop a de-
monstration project in Ann Arbor for the Michigan
Energy and Resource Recovery.Association using
solid waste for the production of methane gas. April
30, 1975
Amended and voted for a soil erosion and
sedimentation control ordinance which provides

Supported a revised quota for sewer hookups in
Ann Arbor to help the water quality of the Huron
River. Mar. 15, 1976
" Supported an ordinance to regulate the kind of
matter that may be deposited into sanitary and
public sewers. July 19. 1976
Co-sponsored and voted for the resolution urging
voters to support proposition A on the ballot to go
to returnable bottles. Oct:, 1976
" Supported a resolution to reduce the quantity of
salt put on roads to a minimum level that would still
ensure the safety of citizens. This resolution also
directed the city to plow more streets sooner for
safety and to reduce the need for salt.
, r ,Elect
- U
h
Beicher
i for MAYOR
Mn.a. Aril At

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EAST
LIBERTY

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