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March 19, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-19

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Saturday, March 1 '9, 1 '9,1 tHE MICH1(~AN DAILY

Saturday, M4rcfi 19, 197/7

THE MICHIGAN D ELY

Page Three

DAILY DIGEST MARCH 19, 1977
byt nnn icinahu tlo _Ithna A mn~io 'h~tnn"raeh. n m nnR~ ma. Dn m n IT A . t..__a _ia . -.. _. ..

I

International
Hanoi returns
U.S. dead
HANOI, Vietnam - Vietnam
yesterday handed over to a U.S.
presidential commission the bod-
ies of 12 U.S. flyers killed in the
Vietnam war. "It is so moving,"
said commission member Mar-
ian Edelman as she viewed the
black caskets and fought back
tears.
The transfer, which came on
the eve of the commission's de-
parture for Vientiane, Laos, was
made at Hanoi's Van Die Ceme-
tery. Commission chairman
Leonard Woodcock said Hanoi
had also set up "machinery" to
account for Americans still list-
ed as missing in the war. And it
was revealed that some Amer-
ican military deserters may be
living voluntarily in Vietnam.
Commission members walked
into the small, concrete r o o m
where a dozen small, black steel
caskets were laid out on a long
bench. Vietnamese medical at-
tendants in white face masks
stood at attention as the Amer-
icans checked off the n a m e s
agailnst the list Hanoi h a d
announced in September. w
Commission member R o g e r
Shields pointed to the name of
Air Force Capt. Samuel E. Wat-
ers of Mocksville, N.C., printed
on one casket. "We first asked
about him in 1971," he said. "We
have him back at last."j
Woodcock, president of the
United Auto Workers, told a
news conference that the bodies
would be flown out of Vietnam

bpy the~ comiioni wheni t e.av-
es for Laos on Saturday to seek
an accounting of Americans mis-
sing in that Indochina country.
The Vietnam News Agency
said Hanoi agreed to the trans-
fer of bodies, but made no men-
tion of the transfer itself.
In Bellevue, Neb., Ms. Frank
Roark, mother of Navy Capt.
William Roark, had a "mingled
reaction" to the news that the
remains of her son were turned
over to the commission.
Roark was 26 when he w a s
shot down while flying a bomb-
ing mission over North Viet-
nam April 7. 1965.
"I'm thankful that our coun-
try made an extended effort to
accomplish this," Roard s a i d.
"A person almost has to lose a
son to understand."
Lebanon
massacre1
BEIRUT, Lebanon' - More
than 200 Christian villagers have
been massacred, some by dag-
ger slashes in the throat, and
dozens are missing in a two-
day wave of reprisals for the
assassination of leftist Moslem
leader Kamal Jumblatt, security
officials said yesterday.
Syrian peacekeeping troops
sped into the central Lebanese
Chouf hills to try to halt the re-
venge killings by Jumblatt's!
Druze followers, and both Chris-
tian and Moslem leaders warned
that continued bloodshed could!
escalate into renewed sectarian
warfare.
Security police investigating
the Jumblatt assassination Wed-
nesday have given no indication
Christians were responsible. But
the Druzes, whose hostility for

tneir maronite Christians neigh-
bors in the mountains has a long
history, appeared to have few
doubts.
"I call on you to be true toj
my father's memory and testa-
ment by upholding your fra'ern-
al relations with our neighbors,"
said Jumblatt's son, Walid, ind
an appeal over the national ra-
dio. "What has happened is aI
departure from Druze tradi-
tions."
The elder Jumblatt was poli-
tical leader of the Druze sect,
a mystical offshoot of Islam.
Most of its 175.000 Lebanese ad-
herents live in the rocky Chouf
mountains southeast of i3eirut.
He also headed the Moslem-Pal-
estinian alliance in Lebanon's
19-month war between le gist
Moslems and rightist Christians.
The Maronite Christian pat-
riarch, the Most Rev. Antonis
Khreish, called the attacks on
Christian villages scattered
through the Chouf mountains
"massacres."
"I have warned and I am
warning again that violence willI
lead only to violence." Patriarch
Khreish said in a statement.
This was a reference to pa.s-
sible Christian countervenge-
ance. A high official of the
Christians' Phalange Party said
warnings went down to the par-
ty faithful to avoid creating a
spiral of violence.
* * *

However, Belgian Premier
Leo Tindemans told reporters in
Brussels the situation in Zaire
was confused, and that his gov-
ernment lacked detailed inform-
ation about what was happening
in its former colony, once known
as the Belgian Congo.

National
Bell defends
actions
WASHINGTON - Atty. G e n.
Griffin Bell yesterday defended
the deal to release the leader
of the Hanafi gunmen, saying
it 'was only a minor concession
to win the release of more than
100 hostages.
"This was realy a very mini-
mal action. I thought, g i v e n
the release of the hostages, that
it was not a drastic thing to
do," Bell said at a news confer-
ence.I
The attorney general said he
personally authorized the re-
lease of Hamaas Abdul Kmaalis
on his personal recognizance af-
ter the Hanafi leader and h i s
11 comrades surrendered to po-
lice and freed hostages they held
in three Washington' buildings.
He said he approved the ac-
tion on condition that a judge
agreed to it and Superior Court
Judge Harold Greene went
along.
No other promises were made
to the Hanafi Moslems, B e 11
said. "There's no agreement ex-
cept for one man, Khaalis, be-
ing released on his own recog-
nizance."
Khaalis did not seek immunity.
from prosecution and ".I would
not have given him immunity."
Except for restrictions on trav-
el, Khaalis remains free pending

Inflation
WASIMGTON - Consumer
prices took their biggest jump
in 2.5 years in February, rising
a full percentage point, and ad-J
ministration economists warned
yesterday that prices may rise
sharply again this month.
The major reason for the
sharp increase was 'a 2 per cent
rise in food prices, including a
record 20.9 per cent jump in
fresh vegetables, which the La-
bor Department blamed on the
severe winter weather.
Coffee rose another 9.9 p e r
cent to a level 82.9 per cent
higher than a year ago.I
The department said higher
food costs accounted for h iif of
the over-all increase last month.
Higher fuel and natural gas
prices were blamed for 7 per
cent of the jump.
The 1 per cent rise in -1e
over-all index in February com
pared with an eight-tenths per
cent increase in January and
would mean an annual inf'aiton
rate of 12 per cent if continued!
for the rest of the year. In
1976, prices rose a moderate 4.R3
per cent.
But administration economists
said the increases do not fore-
shadow a return to the infltion
that the nation experienced in
1974 when prices rose 12.2 per
cent.
"Although we can't dismiss
any concern about inflation, I
don't think the underlying forc-
es have changed so that we face
a double-digit rate," said Ma9-
nard Comiez, a top Commerce
Department economnist.
In February, the concumer{
price index stood at 177.1, mean-
ing that goods and services sei-
ling for $100 in 1967 now costj
$177.10. Over the past year pric-
es have risen 6 per cent.

State____
Plant knew
PPB dangers
CADILLAC - The manager
of a plant that produced PBB
said yesterday his superiors
knew the dangers of the toxic
chemical in 1971 but did not tell
him until it began wiping out
Michigan dairy cattle three
years later.
Charles Touzeau,'manager of
the Michigan Chemical Co.
plant in St. Louis, Mich., said
he first learned of the long
if
yOU 1
see
news
Ehappen
call
76-DAILY
Horseback Riding
(NO GUIDES)
Hayrides--
Rec. Hull for rent
12 hr. South on RT 23
To Sameria
Exit on M 151-g-East 5 min.
DOUGLAS MEADOWS
RANCH
2755 M 151
Temperance, MI 48182
Ph. 313-856-3973

term health hazards of PBB in,
a product safety bulletin in1
1974, a year after tons of PBB-
tainted livestock feed were sold
to Michigan farmers.
Testifying in Michigan's first
PBB trial, Touzeau said he
learned later that the firm's'
Chicago headquarters had sent
letters to buyers of PBB, a fire1
retardant, in 1971 warning of the
dangers of long-term exposure
to PBB.
He said he never saw thej
letter.
Michigan Chemical and Farm I
Bureau Services, the firm that
mixed and sold PBB-tainted
feed in 1973, are defendants in

a $1 million damage
by Falmouth, Mich.,
Roy Tacoma.

Tacoma claims PBB, or
polybriminated biphenyl, poi-
soned his dairy herd resulting
in the loss of some 200 cattle.
Thousands of other Michigan
farm animals that ate the
tainted feed have died or were
destroyed.
Now Appearing At
SECOND CHANGE
Freewheelin'
994-5350

suit filed
dairyman

POWERFUL PEOPLE NEEDED
Because of graduation and term expiration, Student Govern-
ment has student openings on all of the:
U44iVERSITY COMMITTEES
S.A.C.U.A. COMMITTEES
M.S.A. COMMITTEES
POWERFUL PEOPLE are needed to fill these vacancies and
deal with the administration and faculty members.
If you feel that you can handle the challenge and the respoli-
sibility, apply now at the M.S.A. offices, 3rd floor, Michigan
E Union.AA
DEADLINE MARCH 30

i

"SAT f ,-

. AMA

I

r

I

Rackham Student
ov't elections
Elections for Rackham Student Government (RSG) will
be held on March 30, 31 and April 1.
RSG, the representative body of graduate students,
elects its members from five administrative divisions within
Rackham. Each division is allocated one representative
for every 500 students.
IN DIVISION I, Biological and Health Sciences, there
are two seats up for grabs. Division II (Physical Sciences
and Engineering) Diviion III (Social Sciences) and Division
IV (Humanities) have three vacancies apiece. Division V,
Education, offers four openings for interested candidates.
In addition, two executive officers - President and Vice-
President - will be elected and must run as a single slate.
All positions are open to any student currently enrolled
in the graduate school. Interested students can submit a
written nomination to the RSG office, 2006 Rackham, by 1
p.m., Monday, March 21. Applications should include the
nominee's division and phone number.
Proposed changes to the RSG bylaws will also be on
the ballot for approval.
Any questions concerning either nominations or the elec-
tion should be directed to the RSG office, -763-5271, between
9 a.m. and 1 p.m., or to Ron Jones, Chairman of the RSG
Election Committee. He can be reached at 764-6309 or
663-0167.

11

A ngolan advance
KINSHASA, Zaire -- Rebel;
forces, who invaded southern
Zaire from Angola, were report-
ed 93 miles west of the copper
mining center of Kolwezi yester-
day and advancing eastward vir-
tually without resistance.
The U.S. Embassy said 11
American construction workers
were flown out of Kolwezi yes-
terday, leaving 41 there. Twen-
ty-six other Americans, wives
and children of the construcrion
men, were flown out earlier this
week.
Informed diplomatic sources
said the rebels, who have mov-
ed almost unchecked through
186 miles of Shaba Province
since last week, were also
branching out toward a garrison
and other towns north of Kol-
wezi.
No fighting was reported yes-
terday between President Mo-
butu Sese Seko's government
troops and the rebels, believed
to be foes of Mobutu returning
to their home province. Shaba
was formerly known as Katan-
ga, and the invaders are said
to be remnants of the Katanga
army of the late Moise Tshom-
be.j
Authorities in Kinshasa denied
reports Thursday that Kolwezi
had fallen. and Belgian diplo-
mats agreed. They reported that,
the Zaire government's troops
were still in command of Kol-
wezi, adults were at work and
children at school.

P Y
CELEBRATE:
YOUR BIRTHDAY
WI TH U S
PRETZEL BELL

t4

Iiuw u111 pputuauR~
Read all about
the tumultuous
centennial.A
year that was
in this
"wickedly wise,
savagely funny"
(The Atlantic)
"scandalous,
entertaining"
(Chicago Tibune) ,
novel by one of
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authors.
A NW BALLA NE BESTSELLER
S2 25 wherever paperbacks art sold

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I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Y.a v YY. f.,Fe f4 Y f?%i}.;;? Y,".' {;f''l Y:r: ;;::;.{, ,J{;;" {"::y""i^""

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Saturday, March 19, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Carl Oglesby, former Pres.,
S.D.S., "The Whole Bay of Pigs
Thing," part of the series "Yank-
ees and Cowboys: The Dallas-Water-
gate Decade,"~ 12:55 p.m.
Music School: Japanese Folk Mu-
sic, Rackham Aud., 8 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B. - 764-7456
RECRUITING ON-CAMPUS
March 21-25:
March 21: Intermetrics, Inc.
March 22: Action/Peace
Corps/Vista
March 23: Action/Peace
Corps/Vista. K-Mart Apparel,
and ROTC
For information on the following
call 764-7460:
The Weyerhaeuser Company is
sponsoring a Science/Engineering
Intern Program. Selection of in-
terns is made in early -March with
notification no later than April 1.
First week is orientation to the com-
pany. Permanent employment will
be offered to interns whose per-

formance standards are high and
who express an interest in a career
with Weyerhaeuser. Send your re-
sume to Weyerhaeuser Co., Science
& Engineering Summer Intern Pro-
gram, Tacoma, WA 98401. Include
your present address and phone (and
permanent, It different), name of
your college or university, copy of
transript, of courses and grades,
and description of extra curricular
and employment activities. State
briefly the types of assignments you
feel are most appropriate to further
your professional development.
Small Northern Michigan Hotel
needs: piano player, cooks, secretary,
maintenance personnel, and rota-
tional workers for food service and
housekeeping. Ann Arbor phone:,
769-4222 for information.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 763-4117
Camp Sequoia, MI. Coed. Will in-
terview Tues., March 22. Positions
include Western riding instr., arts
and crafts, archery and riflery, na-
ture. Call for appointment.
Northrup King, Minneapolis MN.:
Seed company, will interview Tues.,
March 22 and Wed., March 23. Must
have drivers licence and be able
to travel anywhere. Excellent oppor-
tunity for business experience. Ex-
cellent salary.
Good Humor will interview Thurs.,
March 24 and Fri., March 25 fromf
9-5 p.m. Big opportunity with big
money. Work in own area; i.e., Cleve-
land, etc. Spend a summer out-
doors.
D FOR.
UBLICA TIONS
!IONS

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 133
Saturday, March 19, 1977
i5 editednand managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan48109.
Published d a iily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
tersi; $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.3
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
APRIL GRADS
to attend yommencement x
you must order a
cap and cown by
MARCH 30, 1977
From the U. CELLAR
769-7940

a grand jury indictment. In
terrorist situations, Bell s a i d
police should be free to nego-
tiate with gunmen in an effort
to free 'hostages. "It probably
would be a very foolish course
to refuse to negotiate at all.
After all, you're trying to save
lives."
SCIENCE FICTION-
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In the four semesters in which the Arts Apprentice-
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states, the District of Columbia, and two foreign coun-
tries have served as apprentices to outstanding New
York artists.
Students from over forty colleges have enrolled in this
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Tuition: $1,250 for 12 credit hours in fall'
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For more information, mail the coupon below
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