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March 15, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-15

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 15, 1977

PaQe Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. ..

WE MOVED!4
We are proud to announce that we
have moved from our original up-
stairs location on S. State St. to a
N E W STORE and COMPLETE
WORKSHOP at 619 E. Wiliam St.
just off the Diag.
Ann Arbor's 1st and oldest com-
plete leather works. Since 1967.
We have produced a full line of
bags, belts, garments and accesso-
ries. We also have the equipment
and leather on hand to create your
own special orders.

Schuma
(continued from Page 1)
nology, where appropriate.
"So many people have no
imagination and can't see what's
being said," the German-born
economist lamented. "If it's
smaller and cheaper, all they
can think of is the horse and
buggy."
He said adoption of an inter-
mediate level of technology will
help provide "a stable growth
based on human needs and cre-
ativity, restoration of the envir-
onment and primary reliance on
renewable rather than non-re-
newable resources."
BUT INTERMEDIATE tech-
nology, he said, has "a tenden-
cy to disappear."
"We have reached a situation
BILLIARDS
at Reduced Rates
for COUPLES
Today and Every
TUESDAY
at
THE UNION
IA

i

cher speaks at Hill

i where we have only the best and
the latest technology and the
primitive and unforgettable ba-
sic tools, since what is in be-
tween has disappeared:"
The 60-year-old Schumacher
heads the Intermediate Tech-
nology Development Group,
which works with ,Third World
nations in designing some of the
"appropriate technology" which
he advocates.
He said he views the current,
highly-industrialized era as a
"recent and fairly incomprehen-
sible phenomenon" which "can't
go on.''
"O I L CONSUMPTION 50
years ago was five per cent of
what It is now," Schumacher
stated. "And I'll just mention
that 100 years ago, there was no
cement, no electricity, no steel.
All these things which we take
for granted now are of very re-
cent origin and they all are ex-
tremely oil/ or fossil fuel inten-
sive.
"I'm not saying that we're
finished all together, but there
is not very much time to rethink
everything," he added.
Schumacher maintained that
the problem is compounded
"since the world's tremendous
development has been associat-
ed with polarization in the pat-
tern of settlement."

CITING THE United States as
an example, he stated that 92
per cent of the population lives
in urban areas which comprise
only two per cent of the nation's;
land area.
"All of this has profound con-
sequences, particularly in terms
of energy," he said, "because
that centralized way of livingj
makes it quite impossible to
make effective use of solar en-
ergy, wind power, etc. and
makes the society totally de-
pendent on fossil fuels." -
Schumacher said "It is time
to organize ourselves from the
grass-roots up and "not lean
back and wait for government
to do it for us."
SCHUMACHER said he does
not believe violence is necessary
to accomplish a changeover.
"By adhering to the Christian
doctrine, I think we can do it.
In this respect, the Christian
doctrine means you have to be
as innocent as doves and as cun-
ning as serpents. The innocence
makes you immune and the cun-
ning makes you irresistable."

U', union close, but
not close
(continued from Page i ) with the University.
which, both sides admnit, may "THERE ARE quite a lot of.
become central in a future con- people concerned about (the is-
tract 'settlement. sue)," Block said. "The union'
Bargainers have made prelim- is seeking protection for our.
inary efforts to decide whether people so they don't lose their
striking AFSCME workers will jobs."
be subject to disciplinary ac- During the spring break, mean-
tion by the University once they while, supervisory personnel
return to work, continued their attempt to com-
The University does not plan pensate for missing unionumem-
to punish or otherwise ridicule bers.
returning union members who Campus Housing Director John
were not involved in criminal Feldkamp acknowledged that
activities connected with the the break was "helpful" in the
strike, according to Neff. cleaning up and re-supplying of
THOSE PERSONS arrested dorms.
and found guilty of "serious FELDKAMP NOTED that the
wrongdoings," however, may be University's main problem has
subject to disciplinary action or not been one of keeping supplies
even discharge from their work. flowing to the dorms, but one of
In question are union mem- staffing.
bers arrested for vandalism to "We hope the strike doesn't
University property. last much longer," he said.
Block said the "no reprisal" "We've really been pushing our
issue "will be a big factor" in supervisors and staff, and
arriving at a final agreement there's just so much you can

enough
push them."
Picket lines remained in place
during the break, keeping de-
livery trucks moving at slower
paces throughout the campus.
UNIVERSITY officials said
yesterday that AFSCME work-
ers are starting to return to
their jobs in increasing num-
bers, in spite of the strike. In
one case, an entire work unit
from the union has reported
back to work.
Many union members report-
ed threats to themselves or
their families because they were
abandoning the walkout, Univer-
sity sources said.
But AFSCME leader Block re-
ported that "less than 10 per
cent" of the membership was
returning to work. In fact, Block
said that some union members
who had not initially participa-
ted in the strike are now join-
ing picket lines.
THE SLASHING of tires and
smashing of windshields on Uni-
ver&ty vehicles continued last
week, and several bomb threats
in campus buildings were re-
ported as well.
While AFSCME maintains
that the University is being
hard-hit by the walkout, cam-
pus administration continues to
shrug off the strike.
"We're continuing to serve
students and patients," Neff
said. "We have no intention of
closing the University. The facts
speak for themselves."

Council debates waste pians

PTP

presents Daytie TV. Stars

(Continued from Page 1)
square one," he said.
PLANS FOR the project must
be submitted to the DNR by
August 1 ift approval is to come
from the federal Environmental
Protection Agency by September
30.
Planning for the sewage treat-
ment facility began in fall 1975.
Since then, the estimated cost of
the expansion has risen $6 mil-
lion on the local level alone. The
city will contribute only 15 per
cent of the cost of building the
new facilities. The remaining 85
per cent will originate from
state and federal funds. The
city, however, will pay all oper-
ation costs upon completion of
the plant.

Price cited reasons for the in-'
crease in the cost of the facility,
including the addition of nollu-,
tion control equipment and a
sixteen per cent inflation factor.
FUNDING FOR apy additional
plans which' are not approved
by September 30 must be borne
by the city.
Although he refused to take a
stand supporting either the in-
cineration or composting plans,
Council member Ronald Trow-
bridge (R-Fourth Ward) said,
"With incineration we risk the
possibility of air pollution, but
with composting we add the
dangers of seepage into the
ground.
"The question is, should we

pay 40 per cent more to avoid
the possibility of air pollution,"
he said.
C,O U N C IL MEMBER Earl
Greene (D-Second Ward) said,
"It's Tweedle dum or Tweedle
dee between the compost and
the incinerator. Personally, I'm
opposed to smoke or putting oth-
er things in the air."
Greene added that he was will-
ing to take the risk of harmful
materials from compost used as
landfill and fertilizer rather than
risk air pollution from incinera-
tion.
To change the sewer plan now
would increase the time needed
before any plans could be ap-
proved by the DNR and EPA.

I

Y6
x ?i"
1{1.
BeRNARD BARROW
-j(MNNY RYA! "

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.inOM&UIB
March 25-27 Power Center
Fri.-Sun. at 8:00 p.m Sun. at 2:00 p.m.
Ticketsavailable at PTP Ticket Office
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, Mon.-Fri. 10-1, 2-5
For Information Call: 764-0450
Tickets also available at all Hudsons

PLAI

TALK

/_

A

U

How hiring you
can cost somebody
$42,168
Whatever America's unemployment
rate. 89,(XX),(XX) of us now hold jobs.
That won't mean much when you look
for a job, yourself. You'll have tough
competition. You're among 18(X)0,000
imore Americans looking for work over
the next ten years. That's how many
new jobs America must create, includ-
ing yours.
It's going to cost a lot of money.
Before you get a dime of salary, who-
ever hires you will have to buy tools,
office space, factory equipment and
buildings-the things it takes to let you
do your job. The average cost to com-
panies is now $42,168 for each job.
We don't mean you can't be hired
until your employer finds exactly
-42,168. You might walk into an existing
job. But don't count on it. Not with
1 8,(XX),(XX) competitors. Some compa-
nies can hire you for less than $42,168.
But others-heavy industry, for
instance-need much more. At Armco,
our cost is now S55,6(X) a job.+
That money must come from
whatever a company has left over after
expenses. In other words, from profits.
A company might borrow againstfu-
ture profits to make you a job. But
still, profits pay for jobs because that's
the only source companies have.

to
FREE" -Armcos
plain talk on
how to get a job
We've got a free booklet to help you
get a job. Use it to set yourself apart,
above the crowd. We answer 50 key
questions you'll need to know. Like why
you should bone up on companies you
like. What to do after the first inter-
view. Hints to make you a more aggres-
sive, attractive job candidate. All
prepared for Armco by a consulting
firm specializing in business recruiting,
with help from the placement staff of
a leading university.
Send for your free copy of How to
Get a Job. Write Armco Steel Corpor
ation, Educational Relations Dept.,
General Offices, U-1 Middletown,

Plain talk
about PROFITS
Over our company's 77-year history,
Armco has averaged 5C profit on each
dollar of sales. We pay out part of our
earnings immediately in dividends to
Armco's 100,000 shareholders. So out
of each nickel, we have perhaps 3C
left to invest in new jobs.
Building $55,600 jobs-3C at a
time-is tough. At this rate, we must
sell another $1,850,000 worth of
products and services to clear enough
money for a single new job. That's
why better profits are important. They
make more jobs. Even Government
jobs. The Government's money comes
from taxes on all of us who work.
Next time some know-it-all sneers
at money-grubbing business' ask him
what he'd do without it. He's sneering
at his own job chances, and yours.

Armcowants your plain
talk about profits and jobs
Does our message make sense? Wed
like to know what you think. Your
personal experiences. Facts to prove
or disprove our point. Drop us a line.

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