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January 07, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-07

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S
'Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 7, 1977

Page Two THE MICHiGAN DAILY Friday, January 7, 1911

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Grievances mire GEO, U';
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(Continued from Page 11
still determined to sign a con-
ract before arbitration is
played out, but the University.
has flatly rejected that propos-
al. The administration refuses
to seal the agreement until GEOL
agrees to one of the suggested
"remedies": withdrawal of the
grievances, a return to the bar-
gaining table to settle the dis-
agreement, writing new lan-
guage on the disputed article,
or proposing another solution.

'IT ALL depends on the
union," Forsyth said.
Negotiations for the 1976-77.
contract began almost 10 months
ago and Forsyth says, "If they
wait another month, we may
just negotiate a two-year con-
tract with one whole year of it
being retroactive."
sGE spokespersons say there
is no reason a contract couldn't
have been signed last Novem-
ber, when all other contract is-
sues were ironed out. These
relatively .insignificant griev-
ances, they say, shouldn't pre-
vent a signing.

The whole controversy prompt-
ed GEO to file an unfair labor
practice complaint with the
Michigan Employment Relations
Commission (MERC) late last'
November,ncharging the Univer-
sity with bad faith bargaining.
MERC has scheduled a hear-
ing for February 2. The adver-
saries both insist they have the
case in the bag.
"OUR lawyer says we've got
them cold," Moran said last
month.
Forsyth commented yester-
day, "They (GEO) don't have a
chance in the world to win the
unfair labor practice."

(Continued from Page 1) on gains made in graduate pro- have an impact on future fac-
cation, Music, Nursing, Phar- grams. The number of doctor- 'ity appointments,
macy Public Health, and the ate degrees awarded to blacks The Regents accepted the re-
Rackham School of Graduate increased from 35 to 59 this 'port with little comment. Re-
Studies combined for a total de- year, although only eight9Asia g Sntarah Power (D-Ann Ar-
crease of 164 minority students Americans received Ph.D.'s in bor) asked if the University had
over 1975. With the exception of 1975-76, as compared to 23 in ever undertaken a "systematic
the School of Art, these schools 1974-75. review" of why minority stu-
and colleges all suffered de- dents leave school. George
creases in total enrollment. RHODES EMPHASIZED the Goodman, director of the Uni-
Minority enrollment in the importance of the increase in versity's Opportunity Program,
Literary College (LSA) rose the number of minority students replied that there has been no
from 1087 to 1339 - an increase who received certificates of doc- such study, but said he suspect-
of 252 over 1975. toral candidacy. Minorities com- suchstudbtsawesee -
But English and Vice Presi- prised 16 per cent of those stu- ed that students were leaving
dent for Academic Affairs dents pursuing Ph.D. work in more for academic reasons
Frank Rhodes put the emphasis 1975-76. Rhodes said this could rather than financial difficulties.
Carter may roose
tax cutsanreom

f

The first crops in Mon
were wheat and potatoes g
by Father Pierre Jean
Smet, a Jesuit missionar
St. Mary's Hission near
ensville.

THE UNION contends theI

ntana University is illegally holding Meanwhile; the union is wait-
rown out on a "non-mandatory bar- ing and subsisting. "It's tight
n De gaining issue" (the grievances) for us financially but we're try-
and is trying to delay the sign-
y of ing of a contract in an effort to ing to get members to pay
Stev- break the uniop by depriving it (dues) outside the check-off
of vital membership dues. system," said Moran.

t
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(Continued from Page 1)
manufacturer of hi-fidelity
equipment, as his choice to be
undersecretary of commerce.
Harman, who is president,
chairman and chief executive
officer of Harman Internation-
al Industries Inc., has no pre-
vious experience in government.
" The Atlanta Constitution
reported that Clifford Alexander
Jr., a black Ivy League lawyer
defeated in his 1974 race for
mayor of Washington, D.C., is
under serious consideration to
head one of the three branches
of the armed services.
The newspaper said the Alax-
ander's probable post is secre-
tary of the Army. That would
make him the first black to oc-
cupy the position.
The Democratic leaders of
Congress and key committee
chairmen will come to Plains
today to receive Carter's econ-
ornic proposals. House Speaker.~
Thomas "'Tip" O'Neill sairl in
Washington that he expects --
ter to propose tax, cuts, public
works and an expansion of pro-
grams under the Comprehen-
sive Employment and Training
Act.
Carler also scheduled for thisj
morning the announcement of
eight nominations for appoint-
ments to the State Department
and he U.S. Information Agen-
THP M1C7Tf'A*1 PA1* V
Volume. LXXXV1, No. 79
Friday, January 7, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. ,

cy (U.S.I.A.).
The President-elect was to
nominate:
-Richard Gardner, a Colum-
bia University professor of law
and international organization,
to be U.S. Ambassador to Italy.
-Anthony Lake, who quit Sec-
retary of State Henry Kissin-
ger's staff in a dispute over his
policies in Southeast Asia, as
State Department Director of
the Policy Planning Staff.
-Richard Moose as Deputy
Undersecretary of State for
Management. Moose was staff
director of a Senate 'foreign re-
lations subcommittee.
-Richard Cooper, a Yale Uni-
versity economics professor, as
Undersecretary for Economic
Affairs.
-Lucy Benson, a formerI

president of the League of Wo-
men Voters and Secretary of
Health Services in Massachu-
setts, to be Undersecretary for
Security Assistance,, Science
and Technology, a position that
oversees foreign arms sales.
Benson, 50, will occupy the
highest State Dept. office ever
held by a woman.
-Matthew Nimetz, a New
York attorney, as State Dept.
counsel.
-Undersecretary for Political
Affairs Philip Habis will retain
the post to which he was named
by Kissinger.
-John Reinhardt, currently
assistant Secretary of State for
public affairs, will be Director
I of the U.S.I.A.

S'U'continues Nite
Owl bus service
(Continued from Page1) more effective. The biggest
sponsibility. I don't want to single factor is following sug-
tell people it's unsafe to ven- gestions of our safety ex-
ture off into the street - that's 'perts."
not true. The key is good com- The third rape occurred on
mon sense," he said. December 15 between 8:00 p.m.
and 8:15 p.m. when a 25 - year-
H A R L A N Mulder, assist- old woman was on her way to
ant to Vice President and Chief visit some friends who live on
Financial officer James Brink-; Fuller Road between Glen and
erhoff, said that the bus service N. State. She parked her car
will continue as long as people on the street, rather on the full
want it, but that he saw the driveway. As she got out of
$90 per day service as an at- her car and approached the
tempt to calm frightened stu- building, a man attacked her
dents. "The service itself is from behind and held a kitchen
not a real deterrent to an at- knife to the back of her neck.
tack. Sometime it (an attack) She was forced back into her
is encouraged because we have car, where she was raped and
a fixed route. I think if peo- then robbed. Finally, her at-
ple adhere to the suggested tacker fled and she called the
safety, measures it will be police.

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