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March 01, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts & n e t im ent Tuesday, March 1, 1977 Pag Five

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ottke inspires
By JIM STIMSON "Range," a mournful slide gui- often sounds
A FTER TWO encores and a tar song from his new album, player, carr
thunderous standing ovation, "Kottke." It set the audience voices at on
Leo Kottke wondered a l o u d: back and got them ready to go guitar.
"Did I overstay my welcome home. It was precisely th ef Kottke sp
with a third encore?" feet Kottke hoped for, tuning hisg
No way. Kottke and his warm-' Leo appeared without accom- w h e r e fa
up act, Leon Redbone, could paniment, as he always has in "Enough ti
play here aagin next week his ten years of touring. He has, Kottke expl
The second encore, a medley however, added a new road guitar neve
that Kottke described as going ; manager: a close friend named this fishing
". . from a waltz to a ,antata Dave Pelletier. Says Kcttke,; where it's
to spasmodium," left the crowd "Over the years he's probably least."
fired up and screaming for the biggest fan I have-also my Kottke is
more. The piece moved from biggest critic. For me it's the clan. He sta
the slow "Tennessee Wal" to culmination of the last couple of trombone, 1
the stately "Jesu, Joy of Man's years, trying to decide to add "Neither th
Desiring," and finished with a side man or two-bass and trombone re
"Jack Fig," the emotional peak drums, bass and piano. With Kottke. "Ic
of the evening. Dave I feel I've done that." rectly to wh
THE AUDIENCE would not NO ONE PRESENT at Hill "THEY (K
leave Hill Auditorium. The lights could dispute that Kottke needs just wanted
came on, taped music was play- no side men, though he uses Hoyle insted
ed, then turned up in an at- them well on his albums. The it And te
tempt to empty the concert hail. opening number of the coicertiendit
AMiN But nothing would satisfy the "Mona Ray" (from Dreams and eough tha
fansa exceptamLeo.dcame along
an tecep on d e d it All That Stuff), was originally it"
arranged for two gui'ars. Yet Kottke is
Kottke played the song with the casual and

like more than oe
rying two and three
nce on his 12-string
ent a lot of time
guitar, to the joint1
ns were saying,1
u n i n g, already."1
ained, "A 12-string1
r gets in tune. AllI
around is to find+
out of tune the
a self-taught musi-
rted with violin and
but gave them up.-'
he violin nor the
ally got to me," said
could never go di-j
at I wanted to try.
KOTTKE'S teachers)
to go according to1
ad of having fun at
spoiled it, at least
t when the guitari
I was overcome by'
one of the most
relaxed performers

I'm Arnold Palmer." He doesn't ( meanor raised spore chuckles
dress like a star; in fact, he from the audience.
dresses like the guy next dour Redbone's voice sounds like
One flashy part of the concert it's coming from a dying juke-
(aside from K o t t k e ' S guitar box. He seems to be s student
playing, of course) was the of the Elmore Jones school of
lighting. During "Jesu," a soft southern blues vocals, with his
blue light played over the organ guttural, garbled crooning. Most
pipes at rear stage, perhaps , of the lyrics were inconiprehen-
hinting at the classical origin sible.
of the song. When the tempo The first thing Kottke did
shifted up for "'Jack Fig," bright1 when he got onstage was to get
lights flashed with the music. the giutar monitor'turned down.
Then, for the m el a n c h o y The first thing Redbone did Was
"Range," a deep blue spot to have it turned up. He estab-
closed in on Kottke, aiding tre- lished himself as a comrpetent
mendously in establishing the guitarist and a unique enter-
atmosphere. tamer--but for the pe'ple who
came to see Kottke, the humor
BLUES - SINGER - funnyman wore thin after a while.
Leon Redbone warmed up the Nothing?-however, could have
crowd for Kottke. He came en dulled the excitement of the eve-
looking like Frank Zap a gone ning. It's often a surprise to
beatnik, and proceeded to ha- find out how many peope have
rass the stage hands with a never heard of Leo Ko tke, but
flashlight. He stepped onstage judging from the reaction of
equipped with a drink and a the Ann Arbor audience, the
cigarette, and his very de- word will spread soon enough.
STONIGHT is.
LADIES NIGHT
ALL LADIES ADMITTED FREE
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IOSECOND (IANk(T
Appeeriq Thgu SundayB
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audience at Hill

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJ
Kottke in concert

Flautist Rampal pipes lyrically

same flair and fullness as the to appear in Ann Arbor lately.
recorded version. In fact, he He came onstage and said, "Hi,

I

By KAREN PAUL
ZA-PIERRE RAMPAL is a performer
iextraordinaire.
Thi- attribute stems not isniy from his
AmaEing ability to play the flute but also
from his relaxed, confident and friendly
0ge presence. Though performing in pub-
Ii hal become routine for the world famous
flautist, Rampal never gives the impression
of arrogant boredom. He is a man who
knws he is performing for an awe-struck
Audience but who can accept the admira-
t'on and r&ciprecate by giving nothing but
1,43 best.
Last Friday afternoon, Rampal conduct-
-d a master class for flute students in
tht School of Music. As the students play-
ed, Rampai seemed eager to give them
suggstis or to pick up Tiis flute and dem-
natate. When he did stop to correct-usu-
ally on iatters of articulation and phras-
ing - his subtle suggestions mere just what
waS needed to make better mdsical serse.
I the student was able to imitate Rampal's
earple, it made all the difference.
RAMPAL'S RECITAL in Rackham Fri-
day night was another sample of his artis-

try. The entire first half consisted of Ba-
roque sonatas for flute and harpsichord:
Michel Blavet's Sonata in D minor, Vival-
di's Sonata in C major, Op. 13, No. 2, J. S.
Bach's Sonata in E-flat major and Teie-
mann's Sonata in F minor.
Baroque music seemed to best suit Ram-
pel's style. His ability to subtly change
characters of the movements made each
sonata unique. Rampal's remarkable breath
control allowed him to play long phrases,
holding back the tempo for expression and
holding out the last note as a final punctua-
tion. Rampal's virtuoso'technique, eshpeci-
tion. Rampal's virtuoso technique, especi-
ally evident in the fast movements, was
an extraordinary combination of smooth,
seamless lines with distinct articulation.
The accompaniment of Robert Veyron-
Lacroix carefully matched Rampal's inter-
pretations. Whether the harpsichord imita-
ted or harmonically supported the solo in-
strument, Veyron-Lacroix precisely balanc-
ed the ensemble - evidence of the two
musicians' many years together.
VEYRON-LACROIX'S interesting reali-
zation of the figured bass in the Vivaldi

sonata presented the harpsichord as a more
independent instrument, emphasizing imita-
tion of, the flute melody and creating an
almost duet-like texture. For the last half
of the program, Lacroix switched to piano,
on which he proved equally adept.
Perhaps the low point of the evening
was the Martinu sonata: Written in 1945,
the piece is not as exciting and unique as
most 20th century music and lacks the con-
tinuity of a Baroque sonata. Though Ram-
pal's performance did enhance the work,.
it remained disjunct and uneventful.
Bartok's only piece. for solo flute, Suite
Paysanne Hongroise, was originally written
for piano and arranged later for flute and
piano by Paul Arma. Rampal adapted to
the heavy pace and bluesy melody of the
first movement, the humor of the Scherzo
and the contrasting guises of the folk tune:
in the last movement.
Rampal pleased the standing room only
crowd with three encores - the Allegretto
from J. C. Bach's Sonata in F major,
Mozart's Rondo, K.14, and Ravel's En
Forme de Habanera - each performed
with Rampal's personal mark of excel-j
lence.

I

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i

ANN AIEC 11LM CC-CC0
Tonight in Auditorium A, Angell Hall
Tuesday, March 1
IN THE YEAR OF THE PIG
(Emile de Antonio, 1968) 7 ONLY-AUD4 A
A dynamic documentary, an assemblage of news footage and inter-
views that presents an overview of the Vietnam War. One W the
first films to present Hoa Chi Minh as hero and suggest that the
Vietnamese are willing to die because they are united in a
common purpose, IN THE YEAR OF THE PIG damns American
aggression by using words out of the mouth of American leaders.
"Every day someone jumps up and shouts . . . How did you get
us into Vietnam. You've been in Vietnam for ten years."-Lyndon
B. Johnson.
THE GREEN BERETS
(John Wayne, Roy Kellogg, 19681 9:00 ONLY--AUD. A
John Wayne leads a troop of specially trained "Green Berets' and
tries to convince a liberal journalist, David Jansen, that the U.S.
should be involved in Vietnam. "It passes through being Tun,
through being camp, and becomes an invitation to grieve, not for
our soldiers or for Vietnam, but for what has happened to the
fantasy-making apparatus in this country. . . . If the left-wing
extremist's nightmare of what we already are has become the
right-wing extremist's ideal of what we ought to be, we are in
steeper trouble than anyone could have imagined."-New York
Times.
SHOWTIMES ARE 7 & 9
Admission: $1.25 single feature, $2.00 double feature

PTP'S Raisin': Moving

By MICHAEL JONES AMONG THE many excellent
AISIN IS ThE musical adap- characterizations in this produc-1
tation of Lorraine Hansber- tion, Sandra Phillips' portrayal
ry's award winning drama A of Lena Younger stdod head and;
Rals1a in the Sun. Hansberry de- shoulders above all the others.
scribed her play as one that Her acting and singing had a
"tells thetruth about people, gripping effect on the audience.
Negroes and life." She sang the song "Measure the
I'm sure that those people Valleys" with such poignancyr
who enjoyed the good fortune of that she received a standing
seeing a performance of Raisin ovation at curtain call.
while it was at Power Center The performance V a n e s s a
last weekend would agree that Shaw (Ruth Younger) and Alty-
Haxsberry's description is also rone Brown (Travis) gave in the.
applicable to the musical adap- song "Whose Little Angry Man"
tation of her play. will remain in my memory as
What made the PTP sponsored one of the most touching mo-
rbduetion a success was a com- ments I have seen on the Power
bination of competent direction, Center stage. Another great
imaginative choreography, and; moment of the show was the{
good acting and singing. Donald dazzling, paganistic African tri-
MoKayle, who staged and chor- bal dance. It is a tribute to di- -
tographed the show, was able rector McKayle's staging that
to strengthen and highlight the'this aance came off so success-
various emotional and intellec- fully and did not upset the
tual levels on which the play show's balance and unity.
A Ralsii, in the Sun operates, Musically speaking, this pr-
while *at the same time provid- duction did not have many fine;
ing the spectacle intrinsic to l vocalists, with the exception of
American musical theatre. His Gregg Baker (W a It e r Lee,
direction gave the production Younger). This did not, however,r
unity, which made it compelling detract from the show's impact
and exciting. The use of pan- as musical theatre, since the
toniime, and a stark, somewhat production emphasized staging
abstract set contrasted with vi- and characterization rather than
brant costumes, gave the pro- fine singing. Songs were per-
duetion a suggestive quality ! formed with elan -and feeling,
which aided greatly in achieving and the transitions between the
the goal of aesthetic and Intel-' dialogue and the music were
lectual unity. smooth. Also, the style of this
_ _ _ _ _._ _.. _ _ _--- ---

show's music does not require
fantastic, melodic voices. f
THE MUSIC to this show does,
however, require that the vo-
calists be able to support their;
singing with a depth of feeling
and resonanta ptowe r. Gregg
Baker's deep, rich -voice was a
good medium for the expression
of Walter Lee's dreams and
frustration. Baker had a good
understanding of the character's
motivations and, as a result, he
was able to build a believable
characterization through t'ocal
techniques. Even better at build-
ing a characterization out of
vocal techniques was Phillips,
whose power and intensity add-

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SAM PECKINPAH'S (1962)
RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY
Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea star as
the two old time lawmen who sign on to
r escort gold from the fields to the bank.
Perhops Peckinpoh's best film, not egre-
giously violent.
WED: SHE WORE A YELLOW RIBBON
and THEY WERE EXPENDABLE
RiI~iR TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA G7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.5
M j\,Master of Arts in
Teaching Program
at NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
LIBERAL ARTS SENIORS
THINKING ABOUT A CAREER?
Consider the Master of Arts in
Teaching Program at Northwestern
University and a career in teaching.
n 15 month master's degree program June '77 -
August '78
Advancer' study in your field
. Summer student teaching experience
a SALARIED INTERNSHIP ($4,500 to $6,500) in
nearby school for full school year
Teacher certification, elementary or secondary
a Last year, 84 percent of our graduates seeking
teaching positions found employment as teachers.
Sign up at the Career Plenning end Placement Office for
*n apointment with Dr. Alsn Graham, Suporvisor, Master
of Arts in Teaching Program, Northwestern University, who
wil be on cm p 4Thurday. March 3 fram 9:40ant. to
5:40 P.M.; or cell 764-7456 for an ovuetntment.

Wednesday, March 2 in Aud. A
"LAND OF SILENCE & DARKNESS"
"AGU I RRE, WRATH OF GOD"
Thursday, March 3 in Aud. A
"AGUIRRE, WRATH OF GOD"

I

ed tension and beauty to
songs she sang.

the

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Technology in the rock music industry is showing its
good and bad sides. The invention everyone's talking
ab~out, the wireless electric guitar, will soon be mass pro.
duced and available to musicians everywhere. It con-
sists of a small FM transmitter located on the instrument,
and a highly sophisticated receiver. When tried out in
New York, a guitarist was able to walk off the stage
into the seating area to the sound board and set his
own levels for the show.
Meanwhile, the federal government is developing
'e.ri'4 . r® 1 Ni- - - frnam- - -~fe .n r w k ;-

A R1J!lNA R Fit IL/NI
SCREENING INFORMATION:
Screenings are held in the old Architecture and Design Auditorium at 7:00, 9:00, 11:00 p.m. daily-
1:00, 7:00, 3:00 p.m. on Saturday. Winners and highlights are screened on Sunday at 7.00, 9,00,
11:00 p.m, in both the old Architecture and Design Auditorium and Auditorium A of Angell Hall.
S.innl admision i s$1.25. Series: $16.00. Advance sales begin at 6:00 p.m. for that day only. Series

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