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March 01, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, t

t

Some students
to withhold
dorm rent

(Continued from Page 1)
began last Wednesday, students
have had to contend with left-
overs for meals, longer food
lines, accumulating debris and
slower bus service.
THESE DISADVANTAGES, the
rent strike coordinators believe,
are enoigh to justify withhold-
ing rent.
The average dorm resident
owes $250 in rent fees for this
month, and with a projected
450 students signing up for the
rent strike, the University may
have to do without $100,000 for
the time being. But there are
problems.
The deadline for payments
was yesterday, and many po-
tential participants have already

paid their bills. In addition, a University.
some students' accounts are Teich said
handled by parents, who might about this ca
not be pleased with the idea comment on'
of their offsprihg supporting a ing laws wou
strike. added, "if (th
THERE IS SOME doubt con- legitimate gr
cerning the legality of the strike, ditions, they
as well. While Michigan law (to withhold
provides that tenants can with- Officials fr
hold rent due to inadequate ser- fi could f
vices, it does not necessarilyfierdoo
apply to the University. testrike, but
"It's a test case," admits Mil- personnel sa
ler. "It certainly has never been pernne sa
done before at any University." given no sped
Paul Teich, of the Michigan how to hand
Student Assembly's Housing Re- Tuition pas
form Project, said he knew of eluded in th
no previous case concerning a TU advises st
landlord/tenant relationship in fees in ther

he knew nothing
ase and would not
whether state hous-
uld apply to it, but
he students) have a
ievance to the con-
do have the right
rent)."
om the Housing Of-
ot be reached yes-
imment on the rent
Student Accounts
y. they have been
cial instructions on
le unpaid bills.
yments are not in-
e rent strake, and'
tudents to pay these
normal manner.

r-

Record trade deficit linked
to January's severe cold

WASHINGTON (A) - A re- i
cord monthly trade deficit and
the biggest drop in the nation's
economic indicators index since
the 1974-75 recession were blam-
ed by the government yesterday
on the severe January weather.
Because of plant shutdowns
and transportation snarls, ex-
ports of goods declined 7.8 per
cent during the month to give
the nation a deficit in its for-
eign trade of nearly $1.7 bil-
lion.
THE INDICATORS index that
is supposed to foreshadow future
economic trends was off 1.2
per cent in January, the big-
gest decline since a 3 per cent
drop in January of 1975 during
the depths of the recession.
The Commerce Department
said the weather was a major
contributor to both adverse
economic reports. It said it
"had a pronounced impact in di-
minishing the volume of goodsj
moving out of the country." I

Job layoffs were up, and the
average number of hours work-
ed in a week was down.
BUT THE government still is
confident that the economy is
improving and predicts that
most of the economic ground
that is lost during the winter
will be made up during the re-
mainder of the year.
The drop in ' exports was
across the board, with food
down $144 million and machin-
ery and transportation equip-
ment dropping $615 million.
While total exports were
dropping to $9.6 billion during
the month, imports rose by 2.3
per cent eo nearly $11.3 billion.
EVEN BEFORE the weather
took its toll on trade activity, the
nation was running substantial
deficits in its trade accounts.
It had a 610 million deficit in
December and a total deficit
during 1976 of nearly $5.9 bil-
'lion. The previous record month-
ly deficit of just over $1 bil-

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HAPPENINGS
763-1107
THE ROBERT ALTMAN FESTIVAL
CONTINUES ...
With ANDREW SARRIS, the DEAN OF AMERICAN
FILM CRITICS, on March 3rd, 7:30 p.m. at Rackham
Auditorium. Mr. Sarris has written much on Altman and
films in general. He is a regular contributor to THE NEW
YORK TIMES and THE VILLAGE VOICE, as well as the
founder of the Society of Cinema Studies.
Admission: $1.25
AFRICAN QUEEN
Friday, March 4th-7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m.-
Nat. Sci. Auditorium-$1.25
A Mediatrics Presentation -
ECLIPSE JAZZ Presents...
ANTHONY BRAXTON
in concert
Friday, March 19 at the Michigan Union Ballroom
There will be two shows at 8:00 and 10:30 p.m.
General Admission: $3.50
FUTURE WORLDS: E. F. Schumacher
Alternatives to large-scale technoloay, with emphasis
on human needs and creativity, will be discussed by
British economist E. F. SCHUMACHER at 7:00 p.m. on
Sunday, Match 13th. Dr. Schumacher, author of the in-
fluential "Small Is Beautiful: Economics As If People
Mattered," will be speaking on "Facing the Future: A
Closer Look at Appropriate Technologv" at Hill Audi-
-torium on the University of Michigan campus. There is
no admisison charge.
UAC MUSKET
Presents
THE MUSIC MAN
America's Marching Musical
MARCH 31-APRIL 3
Tickets on Sale Now! Group Rates Available
U.A.C. PRINT SHOP
Do you need bus posters, signs for your office or memo
work? Call the UAC Print Shop, 763-1 107, 3-5 every-
day, for QUICK, CHEAP SERVICE.
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
AT TICKET CENTRAL
-THE MUSIC MAN
-THE ROBERT ALTMAN FESTIVAL
-ANTHONY BRAXTON CONCERT
Additional tickets can be sold at 'the Ticket Central for
a 5 fr service chargie.

lion was set in November of
last year.
The Commerce Department
said the decline in its composite
index of leading indicators was
the first in four months and it
offset completely a 1.2 per cent
increase in the index in Decem-
ber.
Economists say it takes at
least three months for the index
to establish a trend in any one
direction, so a one-month de-
cline isn't viewed with alarm.
The agency didn't blame all of
the decline on the weather, but
said, "The severity of the Janu-
ary weather undoubtedly had
an impact of unknown magni-
tude on the nation's economy,"
including building activity and
manufacturing output.
NINE OF THE 12 components
in the index were off in Janu-
ary, including job layoffs, up to
1.3 per 100 workers from 1.1 in
December, and ' the average
workweek, down to 39.7 hours
in January from 40 hours in
December.
Also off in January were
sales deliveries, change in cash
and other liquid assets, build-
ing permits, changes in sensi-
tive prices, stock prices, the
money supply and new orders
for goods.
Two components improved,
net business formation and con-
tracts and orders for plant and
equipment, while the 12th com
ponent, on changes in business
inventories, was unavailable.
'Ain
postpones
meeting
(Continued from Page 1)
THE SOURCE described the
meeting as an expression of
Amin's policy of "government
by discussion" in which peo-
ple were asked to voice prob-
lems directly to the leader.
Reports. reaching Nairobi in-
dicated about 200 Britons had
been summoned along with the
Americans to meet with Amin
at Entebbe. British diplomats
said they were trying to con-
firm the report.
The cancelled session was or-
iginally scheduled for yester-
day but then reset for' tomor-
row..
WHILE INSISTING he plans
to honor the Americans, Amin
also p his' troops on 24-hour
alert d warne the United
State against .-nting a
commando raid on Entebbe like
the Israelis mounted last sum-
mer.
The government - controlled
radio said Amin was in a "jov-
ial mood" when he met with
a group of Americans and other
{ foreigners who work for Ugan-
da airlines at Entebbe airport
yesterday.
The radio said Amin told the
foreigners he had summoned all
Americans living in Uganda to
a meeting because le had pre-
viously met with other exnatri-
ates "even the British" -
and the Americans hd been
wondering why they were left
out.
The broadcast said Amin
thanked American missionaries
and those in other fields for
taking care of the welfare of
Ugandans. They and other ex-
patriates :deserve honors for
their good work, e reportedly
said.

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OFF!

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CLOSED WED. TIL 3 PM TO MARKDOWN EVERY ITEM
SALE WEDNESDAY ONLY! 3 PM TO 9 PM

ii.

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310 MAYNARD

V;Iolm
AS&

HAPPY HOURS

MARANTZ 2230 AM/FM RECEIVER
High performance) Low noise,
low distortion. Suggested fac-
tory list price $399.95.5

TEAC A-450DOLBY CASSETTE
Deck has Dolby Noise Reduc-A
tion System for quality. Sug-
gested factory list price'$42950. 1 6

PIONEER SX-1050 RECEIVER
One of the most powerful re-
ceivers you can buy! Suggested 4
factory list price $700.00.

Tuesday

--A price on beer
7-11 P.M.
-2 price on
all drinks 7-10 P.M.

F

MARANTZ
IMPERIAL 7
SPEAKERS,
3-way speakers handle
30 watts continuous
powerl Sugg. factory
list price $199.95. Our
lowprice Wed. only.
$!92EA.

pr"--

MMMIIIIL

APPLIANCE CO.

B.I.C. 920
BELT-DRIVE
TURNTASLE
Autom.tic or manual
play. Sugg. Factory
list price $80.00. Don't
miss our 6-hour price!
Wednesday only.
$38

Wednesday

Friday

-15c hot dogs
2-5 P.M.

Sunday Entertainment
9 P.M-A. M.

I MI

I

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