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February 20, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-20

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Sunday, February 20, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

v..................
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FOR THE MOST PART, ti
of yesterday's Antiquarian Boo
A book
By ANNE GERTISE
Streams of people, eager to
tattered pages of aging. litera
into the Antiquarian Book Sale
Union yesterday. Book dealers f
Michigan and Ohio gathered 1
wares to the odd assortment
students and out-of-town cust
Open houses this week, held i
stores and homes preceded whl
dealer called an "absolutely
day." To their delight, many of
browsers even brought along s
own treasured titles for appr
ONE CUSTOMER eyed at
anxiously. "How would I dispose
I found in my mother's attic?
ered a first edition of Lady
Lover."
The book dealer's eyes lit u
the words?" he asked eagerly
which had been censored for
during the late 19th century.
Many of the book dealers at
sale sell antique books only a
One explained, "Used book d
special breed - they love to
are truly collectors inside."

Daily Photo by CHR
he days of price haggling are over. Bu
k Sale seem to be reviving the pract
lover's par

Ut these two -visitors
ice.
idise
d a book he had tried
y Law School. "They
are of the tax bene-
ributions."
found delectable
s collection of culin-
s were attracted to
ions. In one case a
would have to be
t Louis Stevenson's
price tag of $1,500.
re looking only for
nt and author. "Some
e furniture. They're
tion," one dealer ex-
binding, the overall
and the age are all
book's value. "The
dealer explained, "is
been sitting in some-
ars. They've become
lly . . . they lose a
ed, "If you're really
buy it. Even if it's
er what you think it
te. It will be gone to-
cide to get it."

Carter's budget should

e
st

TH IHGA AL-Pg he

(Continued from Page 1) "It's been interesting, a good
top prize, a trip for two to. Flor- I learning experience," Engman
ida, if they survive the two-day i said."Response has been real-
maraton. Ily good. The businesses in town
becausewe. have supported us. All the food
We cntered and prizes were donated."
wanted to go to Florida," joked Sig a hedoae h
Rohatynski. "Just about the Sma Nu hopes to make the
whole school knows about us. marathon an annual event.
They're all behind us.

(Continued from Page 1)
shift the balance a little bit,"
said one government analyst.
Carter will send his budget
proposals to Congress Tuesday.
Various congressional commit-
tees, starting With the House and
Senate budget committees, are
expected to begin work on it al-
most immediately.
One congressional source said
Carter's proposed changes to the
Ford budget are likely to stand
without major revision in Con-
gress unless there is a major
setback in the nation's economy.
For one thing, there have beenE

close consultations beltween Car-
ter's budget experts and those in
Congress. Many of the changes,
such as restoring funds to social
service programs, are changes
favored by the congressional
majority which probably would
have made them even if Carter
didn't propose them.
FORD'S PROPOSALS for near-
ly $46 billion in tax cuts over
a five-year period will be scrap-
ped- in favor of the more lim-
ited tax reductions that Carter
has proposed and which already
are before thQ Congress.
"Congress' reaction to the bud-
1Bi Bird

,9
b
rl
i
C
1
p
a
s
d
{
e
f
s
s
4
L

get will depen
course of thed
the next six m
congressional s
guess is that it
that different af
completed work
There will be
side pressure to
ing above what
pose to stimuli
and increase j
said.
But he noted
dis-cussion i
Carter's econon
ly about $2 billi
ed onto it so f
He said "the
have to look p
fore Congresst
stantial chang
though somec
statistics have1
and the winter
harsh, he said
likely to look
summer.
Among defen
Carter is expe
a proposed red
to five planesi
schedule of the
bomber.

OTHER PRIZES include col-
or televisions, ten-speed bi-
cycles and footballs autographed
pass5 by the Detroit Lions.
The couples dance for four
hours and then receive a half
hour break.
J a lot on the hu bek
Music for the marathon was
economy during Detroit-
oonths," said one provided by several Dtot
ounce,"Myd on area radio stations.- Two bands
will notMy look awn also volunteered to play during
wil nge hall the free dance which was held
Pier Congress has along with the marathon, last
on it," he said. evening.
considerable out-
increase spend- JANICE McCARTHY was on
Carter will pro- ly kidding when she asked Bry.I
ate the economy an Guthries to dance with her
obs, this analyst in the marathon. "Then he told
me I had to do it," she said.
that for all the "Neither of uscould back
Congress about down," Guthrie said. "When I
mic program, on- said I'd do it I didn't realize
on has been add- how hard it's be to get sponsors.
ar. It took a lot of time." The cou-
economy would ple now has $720 in pledges.
retty grim" be- "We'll make it,". Guthrie said.
would make sub-
ges. And even A L T H O U G H Marathon
of the economic chairman Glenn Engman said
been unfavorable Sigma Nul hope to raise $2,000,1
has been unduly at 4:00 yesterday afternoon a
the economy is drum roll heralded the an-
pretty good by nouncement that donations had
reached $2040. Engman now
projects a goal of $3300.

IN A LETTER thanking the
fraternity, Danny Thomas
wrote: "As you participate in
this 40-hour Dance Marathon for
the hospital, you can take pride
in knowing that your efforts are
helping little children whose
bodies are wracked with the
most horrible diseases known
to man. Efforts such as your
allow the doctors and scien-
tists . . . to continue the mirac-
ulous progress they have al-
ready made in the battle against
catastrophic childhood illness."

/ ' '
.

He's not

fl

but he's all right

R
o ruffle the
ture, flowed
held at the
from all over
to sell their
of children,
omers.
n local book-
hat one book
enthralling
t yesterday's
ome of their
aisal.
book dealer
e of the book
We discov-
Chatterly's
p. "With-all
of the novel
"indecency"
yesterday's
s a sideline.
ealers are a
talk. Many

A local dealer offere
to sell to the Universit
asked me if I was aw
fit for University cont
SOME BROWSERS
treats in Jan Longone'
ary books while other
children's book collect
purchaser's attraction
tremendous - Rober'
Treasure Island had a
Many customers we
beauty, ignoring conter
dealers sell books lik
only meant for decora
plained.
The beauty of the
condition, the author
used in determining a
biggest problem," one
that these books have?
body's basement for ye
wet 'and they are sme
lot of value."
Another dealer advis
interested in a book.
five or ten dollars ov(
should be, don't hesita
morrow when you de.

(Continued from Page 1)
ing the youngsters to which his
shows (Sesame Street and Elec-
tric Company) are geared, Con-
nel then turned the tables on his
two blond-haired, would-be re-
porters.
"'What do you think would
happen if Big Bird was a
grouch?" he asked the young-
sters.
"'Oscar and Big Bird would
get along better," Mike an-
swered quickly.
"Did you learn anything from
Sesame Street?" the producer
asked.
"'Not much."
The interview ended quickly
thereafter, with the children,
running off to play with their pa-
per airplanes and leaving Dave
Connel - weary after a plane
flight the night before - free toa
talk briefly about the course of
children's programming.
CONNEL, who toted away a
bachelors degree in business and
a Masters in television from the
University, produced Captain
Kangaroo for 11 years before
moving over to the Children's
Television Workshop, creator of
Sesame tStreet and Electric
Company.
An astute observer of televi-
sion and its affect on children,
Connel believes that the emer-
gence of shows such as Sesame
Street have been a bright spot

1n a lackluster video past.
"My general view is that tele-
vision has and continues to grad-
ually improve," he said. "It still
has a very long way to go,
though."
However, he notes that 'good
programming is the exception,
rather than the rule."
"We haven't been giving too;
much thought to what TV is do-
ing to us," he added.
While Connel contends that.
situation comedies are "dread-
ful," and shows like Bionic Wo-
man are not aimed at raising
the childrens' "intellectual lev-
el", he believes that television;
should not take the blame for
the negative effects it might'
have on young viewers.
"I THINK you can pull them
(children) away by giving them
an alternative. It's not just a
problem of the programmers
and the networks, but the par-
ents rtoo."
"That thing has an off
switch," he continued.
But Connel says that all pro-
gramming need not be geared
to developing children's minds.
and that shows such as Sesame
Street serve their specialized
purpose.
"I don't think it all has to be
educational," he said. "But the
appalling quality of much of the
entertainment medium is what
I find distressing."

SALE & EXHIBIT
ORI ENTAL
GRAPHICS
[EB. 23-24
MARSON LTD

ise m angest rai
cted to make is
uction from eight
in the production
controversial B1

Isis Revealed-
The Black &
The White
Edwina Drobney
Janet Taylor Pickett
feb. 8-27.
reception: feb. 11, 7-9
HOURS
-Fr., 10-6
Weekends, 12-6
764-3234
FIRST FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION

$
S$
REST EASY!
SELL IT THRU
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW
764-0557

I

HOURS
Tu Fr', 10 6
Wc el nds, 12 6
764-3234
FIRST FLOOR MICH-IGAN UNION

I MMMME

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dis."n >:,,,.r ..............t.:..n...:::n................::. :: r::::::::....:::::.;:".: : a.:::w:a:::.: : vn;: :.:::....... a::: r::.::4"i}}i:4:4: v ".

O
P rimaries set for Monday
(sontued from Pag .1 Louis Belcher's Fifth Ward seat in their attitude toward incum-
there are "too many cars" froni him. Belcher is the Re- bent Democratic mayor Albert
downtown. publican mayoral candidate this' Wheeler, who is seeking re-elec-
Robinson, who can be seen year. Ludwig, 37, has been in- tion. Hanks is supporting Wheel-
daily orating to students on the volved in politics since he er's candidacy, while Ludwig
Diag, favors turning Main worked for the city's Utilties De- has refused to endorse the May-
Street into a mall, and says partment. He is a businessman or for "personal reasons."
turning lights off in unused who restores antiques and clas- Both are concerned about
rooms would help lower rents. -sic cars. housing for low-income families
He also promises to wipe out The major difference between better use of public transit,I
pornography in Ann Arbor as a the two candidates seems to be and reform of the City Charter.
means of eliminating crime, and _-.-----_-----_
to improve the quality of food _..._ __-
served in dorms..
Fifth Ward Democrats have
a choice between perennial can-
didate Judith Hanks and upstart FUTURE WORLDS
Kenneth Ludwig to bear their)
party's banner against incum- Presents
bent Republican Council mem-
ber Gerald, Bell. The Fifth JAMES & GRACE L LEE BOGGS
Ward, in the city's :southwest M )
corner, has been a Republican {
stronghold since 1969, but both 1
Democrats feel they have afair
chance to debeat Bell. ,.{>r
HLANKS, 37, lost last year in
~ucst ArtistrSeres
he ri o tae ouncisma
Being American: The
Challenge of Self-Government
T y &MONDAY, FEB. 21-7-9 P.M.
Today at 2& 8r
Feb.1620 Wd-Sw.8pm RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
I Sun.2pm
P erCenter r/
Mendessohn Theatre Lobby. Mon-Fri. 10-1. 2-5 {{ N LO ADMISSION CH A R G E
* ForInormaton Cal: 764-0450 3/
Tickets also avalable at all Hudson' I K -
ADVERTISING IN
DOESN'T COST
~. A j j~.I r

U I

CENTRAL STUDENT JUDICIARY
-OPENINGS-
The Michigan Student Assembly is now acceptinO applica-
tions for the five openings on the Student Supreme Court.
The Judiciary renders decisions on student activity griev-
ances, particularly with regard to student organizations
and student government.
To apply and for further information, come to
the MSA offices at 3909 Michigan Union Build-
ing; or call 763-3241 or 763-3242.

I

MORTAR BOARD
Senior Honor Society4
Invites juniors with GPA's' of 3.4 or
wabove to apply for membership.
For more information and applications
please contact:
ALYSSA TAUBMAN, Pres. DEBBIE CONNELL, V.P.
995-4041 , 995-9851
Application Deadline Feb. 25!

t

ANN ACCU0 L [ELM -CC-)
........ S@.................e....
Tonight in Auditorium 4 of
the Modern -Languages Building
EXPERIMENTAL FILM PROGRAM
Stan Brakhage-THIGH LINE LYRE TRIANGULAR
Stan VanderBeek-MANKINDA
Maya Deren-RITUAL IN TRANSFIGURED TIME
Robert Breer-FISTFIGHT
Carolee Schneermann-FUSES
Ed Emshwiller-LIFELINES
Gunvor Nelson-TAKE OFF
Scott Bartlet-LOVEMAKING
Storn de Hirsch-DIVINATIONS

1]

4-
LINDSAY ANDERSON'S 1963
THE SPORTING LIFE
(AT 7)
The first film by Anderson who later directed IF and 0 LUCKY MAN
is a fascinating study of a young athlete and the divorcee he loves.
Starring Richard Harris and Rachel Rubarts.
TONY RICHARDSON'S 1972
THE LONELINESS OF THE
LONG DISTANCE RUNNER
(AT 9)
Based on Alan Sillitoe's novel, Tom Courtney plays a delinquent youth
who becomes the hopes of the headmaster because of his running
ability. Also starring Michael Redgrave and James Fox.
CINEMA GUILD BOTH FOR OLD ARCH.
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI'S 1950
STORY OF A LOVE AFFAIR
The first feature film by the director of BLOW UP and THE PASSEN-
GER tells the story of Milanese industrialist who hires a private eye to

I

Admission: $1.25

Showtimes are 7 & 9:30

I

Tuesday, Feb. 22 in Aud. A, Angell Hall-
BUNUEL'S
"THE DISCREET CHARM OF
THE BOURGEOISIE"
AND

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