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February 16, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-16

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Page Two

THE NtICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 16, 1971

PageTwo THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, February 16, 191 1

Jacobson's Open Thursday and Friday Evenings Until 8:0

0

Union

talks

extended

yc , "r
ek, k
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through today
(Continued from Page 1) treating us, the more they v
THE UNIVERSITY person- their own heads."
nel office issued a memorandum Today's union leaflet wa
to deans, directors, and manage AFSCME employes to "s
ment indicating precisely what cool," and wait for further
would be expected of union and formation.
non-union workers in the event "Ignore rumors," the leaf
of a strike. says, perhaps showing conc
Director of Personnel Russell over possible false alarms wh
Reister said his department was would prompt needless wa
"encouraging people to continue. outs. Official news of any
their work." velopments will be released o
Each dorm is drawing its own on paper containing the un
plans for emergency replace- seal, it says.
ment of workers. I-
IN SOME cases, dorms are
considering mandatory place-
ment of resident staff in N ljj
AFSCME positions, forcing them
to cross any union picket lines
'with the threat -of losing their T" (
staff jobs. rip s
Dorm supervisors have been
told to recruit students who are -.
willing to cross picket lines.
would be comparable to what
part-time student employes re- (Continued from Page 1)
ceive under normal circum- added.
stances. Furthermore, Freeman sa
Meanwhile, a specially formed support for the struggle of1
pro-AFSCME student group is farm workers was evident wl
attempting to prevent students 40 to 45 percent of dorm re
from filling union jobs should a dents gave up a dinner inr
walk-out occur. vember to raise funds for1
ONE representative of the UFW. These considerati
group, Debra Goodman, said played a major role in UH
that it will go from dorm to decision to continue the f
dorm encouraging students to year boycott, he said.
runion pickets, and to Music School representati
honor uinpkes dtoMike McDonald, said the qu
avoid doing work normally done tion was whether "UHC did
by AFSCME employes. .didntdasmeth ng"U rCngi
"We support a strike if it is did not do something wrong
necesar," oodmn sid,"but willfuilly ignoring the mand;
nec esna todmltan said,ts geof its constituency." He cal
caught in the middle of it." last weeks UHC action
AFSCME Local President Joel ocan arrogance.
Blckadedhes hoin . u Bachelder will formal
Block added he's "hopig stu- MSA's protest in a letter
dents are more concerned with UHC.
their academics than they are The controversy surround
with making money." Other- the School of Public Heal
wise,. students migth. harm an recommendation that thel
AFSCME walk-out by doing un- gents consider terminating1
ion work. school's Population Plann
Block said that in the event of Department was discussed
a strike, the union would organ- last night's meeting.
ize picket lines "at most of the Saying that the review
major buildings." PPD was done without input
He said that he was angered consideration of faculty
over recent University notices students in the program, M
that strikers might be subject urged the Regents to set "r
to disciplinary action or even sonable procedures" for stu
the loss of their jobs. ing program terminations.
"No amount of repression will MSA Vice - President Ste
get the University operating" if Carnevale, contended that M
a strike should occur, Block was "not weighing the me:
said. "The more outrageous and of whether PPD should be p
reckless the University gets in of Public Health," but that1

will
rns
tay
in-
Flet
ern
ich
alk-
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ion

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the

ANGOLA FORCES CUT:

CONGRESSMAN JONATHAN BINGHAM (D-New York), (right), chats with Cuban Prime
Minister Fidel Castro in Castro's office during Bingham's five day visit to the Commun-
ist island nation. Standing next to Castro is interpreter Juanita Vera.

Castro, U.S. rep. meet

sty Ie s,

-12 si zeis.

PLEASE PARK IN THE ADJOINING ENCLOSED MAYNARD STREET AUTO RAMP
JACOBSON'S WILL GLADLY VALIDATE YOUR PARKING TICKET

HAVANA, Cuba () - Cuban'leaders say
they have reduced the number of Cuban sol-
diers in the African nation of Angola by 50
per cent, but declined to give, any specific
number, Rep. Jonathan Bingham; (D-N.Y.),
said yesterday.
He spoke to reporters at the Havana air-
port as he was leaving for the United-States
after a five-day visit to Cuba. He, had two
meetings with President Fidel Castro - a sev-
en-hour conference Saturday and a surprise
meeting Monday night.
CASTRO arrived unexpectedly Monday night
at the hotel where Bingham and his wife were
staying to continue their earlier talks, the con-
gressman said, adding: "We had already un-
dressed, but we made ourselves presentable
and had another hour and a half of conversa-
tion."
Although the Cubans said they had reduced
their troop strength in Angola, Bingham said
he did not anticipate a total withdrawal "for
some time to come."
He said he expects an "extensive, long-term
Cuban involvement in Angola," especially in
the technical and medical areas.
CUBAN officials, he said, were "very proud"
of their role in Angola.
Cuba sent more than 12 000 soldiers to the
former Portuguese colony and they helped
the Marxist Popular Movement defeat two
Western-backed factions in Angola's civil war
early last year.

The Cuban intervention in Africa froze what
had appeared to be a thaw in Cuban-U.S. re-
lations.
WASHINGTON severed diplomatic relations
with Cuba on Jan, 3, 1961, and imposed a tradn
embargo after Castro's Communist govern-
ment expropriated all U.S. business interests
in the country.
Bingham met informally with reporters at
the airport. He said he was not carrying a
"message" from Castro to President Carter
and did not want to discuss details of his talks
here until he had a chance to confer with U.S.
officials.
Throughout his visit Bingham insisted that
lifting of the U.S. trade embargo "would open
the way for negotiations" on resumption of
normal relations between the two nations.
Meanwhile, in Washington, Mexican Presi-
dent Jose Lopez Portillo expressed great satis-
faction yesterday af the apparent willingness
of President Carter to improve relations with
Cuba.
PORTILLO TOLD the National Press Club
that "nothing will be more gratifying for us
than to be a factor in harmony between these
two countries."
He saidrMexico would be happy to take any
steps necessary to bring about normal relations
between Cuba and the United States.
B'it he said he did not believe rxico would
be needed "as there seems to be-good will on
both sides. Direct negotiations will be very
easy and we shall be very happy to see that."

aa ni n n +. es w

Use Daily Classifieds

TONIGHT
LYP AN
WOOOAAO

department should be subject to
a fairer review.
"Our impression througha
talking with the students in PPD
was that School of Public
Health Dean Richard Reming-
ton was initially unwilling to
meet with program students,"
Carnevale said. Carnevale also
said PPD students told him that
in later meetings, Remington
told him that in later meetings,
Remington seemed unfamiliar
with the operation of the PPD,
often confusing the work done
at PPD with demographic pop-I
ulation research performed at
the Institute for Public Policy
Studies.,(UPPS).

PRUE

Join The Daily
Arts Department!
Phone 764-0562

Detroiter chosen
solicitor-general,

CENTRAL STUDENT JUDICIARY
-.OPENINGS-
The Michigan Student Assembly is now accepting applica-
tions for the five openings on the Student Supreme Court.
The Judiciary renders decisions on student activity griev-
ances, particularly with regard to student organizations
and student government.
To apply and for further information, come to
the MSA offices at 3909 Michigan Union Build-
ing; or call 763-3241 or 763-3242.
MINI-COURSE
The University of Michigan will offer a Mini-Course,
No. 411, entitled "An African Perspective on Human
Development," organized by Dr. Harold Stevenson and Dr.
Teshome Wagaw. The class will meet for one month on
Mondays from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesdays from 4-5:30 p.m.
beginning March 14. Registration for the course is through
Drop-Add.
For permisison to register or for more information contact
Sharon Carlson at 341 Victor Vaughn or call 763-1227.
Wednesday, February 16
"The Forgotten Frontier: A Criticism
of Fernand Braudel's View of
Mediterranean History
Thursday, February 17
"The Impact of 16th Century
Inflation Upon Ottoman

WASHINGTON 0P) - Presi-
dent Carter yesterday nominat-
ed a black federal judge to be-
come solicitor general and chose
another black lawyer and two
women attorneys for other rank-
ing positions at the Justice De-
partment.
Carter nominated U.S. Circuit
Judge Wade McCree to become

.nnati, is not meeting.
AS SOLICITOR general, Mc-
Cree will have a decisive role in
choosing which cases and legal
issues the government takes to
the high court and in charting
administration positions on
many other cases reaching the
court.

6

solicitor general, the third-rank- The solicitor general tradition-
ing department position and the ally operates with substantial in-
official in charge of represent- dependence from the attorney
ing the government before the general. but the attorney gener-
g al usually is involved in devel-
Supreme Court. McCree, 56, has oping positions in major cases.
been a judge on the appellate Atty. Gen. Griffin Bell had dis-
court for the Sixth Circuit since closed several weeks ago that
1966. He lives in Detroit when he had chosen McCree for the
the court, which is based in Cin- job.
I9 ,

Earn 8 Credits This Spring
in the New Hampshire Woods
e /

In the time it takes to drive
friend home, you could save
hs life.
Ifyour frend's been drinking
_ I- L -. - 4 . . ...,,

for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes. Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend,

- - -.. m -. -.. -..,.....r.- - r ..ur

11

I

DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y*
BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852

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