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February 09, 1977 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-09

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Wednesday, February 9, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, February 9, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

DAILY
International
Rhodesian
violence
SALISBURY, Rhodesia -
Black guerrillas burned and
looted offices of a second Chris-
tian mission, the government
said yesterday, while security
forces searched rain - soaked
bush for raiders who killed sev-
en white missionaries Sunday.
No casualties were reported
in the raid on Nyashanu fnis-
sion 125 miles southeast of Sal-
isbury near the Mozambique
border. The government did not
say which church operated the
mission or when the attack took
place. It said the attackers took
about $5,400 and burned a mis-
sion workshop and office.
Three Jesuits and four Do-
minican nuns were lined up and
shot Sunday night in an attack
on St. Paul's Roman Catholic
Mission in the Musami tribal
area 26 miles northeast of Sal-
isbury and about 150 miles from
the Nyashanu mission.
Outlawed black guerrilla units
said agents of the white govern-
ment of Prime Minister Ian
Smith were behind the attack,
the largest group killing of
whites in four years of guer-
rilla war aimed at black rule.
The country has 270,000
whites and more than 5 million
blacks.-
There was no official resnonse
to the charge, but it was be-
lieved the government honed to
capturethe attackers alive to
refute the claims.

DIGEST
refrained from commenting on
the deaths.
The Vatican daily newspaper
L'Osservatore Romano said
yesterday the killings were a
crime that "no _civilized crea-
ture could approve."
The shootmgb were deplored
by Pope Paul on Monday and
Archbishop Patrick Chakaipa,
first black leader of the Church
in Rhodesia, said they "made a
mockery" of black nationalist
ideals.
Dissident appeal
MOSCOW - More than 200
Soviet dissidents have appeal-
ed for the release, because of
ill health, of Alexander Ginz-
burg, who disburses the funds
supplied by novelist Alexander
Solzhenitsyn to aid political
prisoners and their families.
In Washington, the U. S.
State Department said it was
"watching with concern" the
treatment of the 40-year-old hu-
man rights activist and has
made the Soviet government
aware of its views.'r
It was the third time since
President Carter took office
Tan. 20 that the United States
had warned a Soviet .Bloc gov-
ernment about. human rights.
Ginzburg's Soviet supporters
made their plea in a statement
addressed to the 35 govern-
ments that signed the 1975 Hel-
sinki Accords.
It said he was- released from
a hospital shortly before his ar-
rest last Thursday, although he,
was "still suffering from pneu-
monia with a tubercular infec-
tion . . . and should be treated
at a tuberculosis dispensary."
Jail is "certain death for a
man in his condition," Valen-
tin Turchin, head of the Soviet
branch of Amnesty Internation-
al, told Western correspondents.
Ginzburg is renorted being
held in prison in Kahiga, about
100 miles southwest of Moscow.
The charges against hint have
-ot been announced, but an of-
ficial pnblication accused him
last week of illegal currency
dealings.
Sarn inim gjlai

FEBRUARY

9,

1977

legislation Monday. President
Ford vetoed strip mining legis-
lation twice in both 1975 and
1976.
Ford said the bills would add
to unemployment and drastic-
ally raise the price of energy.
But Andrus told a Senate sub-
committee that the legislation
would have little effect on
either coal production or unem-
ployment.
Andrus said he favors extend-
ing the proposed coal strip min-
ing standards to cover other
minerals.
But, while Andrus and sev-
eral members of a, Senate In-
terior subcommittee were in
general agreement on extend-
ing the standards, the emphasis
at the subcommittee hearing
was on swift passage of the ba-
sic coal strip mining control
legislation.
S nhmmittI e Chairman Sen

workers laid off due to cold-I
,related problems, and surveys,
for Feb. 3-6, tabulated Monday,
showed no change.
Sindlinger said his firm has
conducted daily unemployment
surveys by telephonehin all 48
contiguous states at the rate of
110 calls per week for the past
20 years.
President Carter's Cabinet
was told Monday that the wea-
ther caused 1.8 million layoffs.
The Labor Department bases
its monthly reports on a sam-
ple week adjusted seasonally,
according to historical data
from the past five years.
Sindlinger does not use sea-
sonally adjusted figures and
claims the adjusted figures in
the government's reports can be
artificially low.

State
Win terization
aid
LANSING-Gov. William Mil-
liken said yesterday that $184,-
000 in federal funds has been
allocated on an emergency bas-
is to continue home winteriza-
tion projects conducted by eight
community action agencies.
Milliken said the money, made
available under the Comprehen-
sive Employment and Training
Act, will be used to hire 42 per-
an~e t re~lk i relah d" r-

doldrums, said yesterday it is
resuming a $600 million expan-
sion program that includes the
building of two new generating
plants.
The company predicted the
projects will be an economic
boon, providing jobs for 3,000
workers at peak construction
times.
Resumption of work on the
utility's Greenwpod facility
northwest of Port Huron and
Fermi plant No. 2 near Monroe
was made possible by a new
rate increase and investments
in the Fermi plant by two North-
ern Michigan electricity cooper-
atives, Edison said.

ahead with the plants
a $22.9 million rate
proved last month by

thanks to
hike ap-
the state.

State protection
LANSING - The Michigan
League for Human Services
called yesterday for prompt
state action to prevent utility
cutoffs to the poor.
"State government has within
its power the means to avert
these cut-offs for welfare recipi-
ents and other low-income citi-
zens," said league President Al-
bert Dunmore.

As part of its recommended
action, the league suggested
that the state Department of
Social Services make the best
use of available federal dollars.
It also urged the state Public
Service Commission to review
its rules (regarding service cut-
offs.
The league, a statewide non-
partisan group funded through
the United Way, asked state
lawmakers to place "high pri-
ority" on increasing grants to
the poor for the fiscal years
through a .supplemental appro-
priation to the social services
department.

0ICUMmTLe e ~sa OT. Tegvrmnts aur
Lee Metcalf, (D-Mont.), said he The government's January
woild resist attemnts to add labor report, based on the week
anything to the basic package. including Jan. 12, reported- sea-
Metcalf said his s'ibcommit- sonally adjusted unemployment
tee would seek to expand the of 7.3 per cent, down one - half
controls, once they are signed of 1 per cent from December.
into law, to anplyvto reclaiming
all manner of abandoned omen- Rotten weather
nit onerations, from copper pits
to marble quarries. WASHINGTON - The cold
wave and gas shortage, which
Unemnployment have put up to 1,567,000 persons
out of work so far, may return
figure off in full force next week after a
temporary break, according to
MEDIA. Pa. - Three million government forecasts.

l
i
1
a
'

sops to cau ,z nsuiae ana re d
pair homes for persons with in- Edison Chairman William
comes below federal poverty Meese said the construction pro-
guidelines. j ects -could not be more time-
ly, with the nation in the grip
"These funds were sorely of a natural gas shortage.
needed to continue winteriza- -"Among the effects of the
tion projects at a time when natural gas shortage will be
Michigan is experiencing a rec- increased conversion of energy
ord cold winter," Milliken said, sources from scarce natural
"The funding will enable the gas and oil to electricity, since
local agencies to continue pro- we can produce electricity from
jects that had been jeopardized coal and uranium, which are in
by a shortage of funds avail- more plentiful supply," he said.
able for labor." "In fact, we have already
In addition, Milliken said seen a marked increase in
$84,585 was released to continue residential and commercial
critical programs for the aging heating systems that do not re-
in several northern Michigan quire gas or oil."
communities. The two plants will provide
1.9 million kilowatts of generat-
Edison ing capacity.
Construction on the- facilities
ex panding was halted in 1974, with Edison
citing the company's deteriorat-
DETROIT - The Detroit Edi- ing financial situation.
son Co., recovering from a Meese said the firm is now on
three-year period of financial the rebound and can move

Save and bundle
old newspapers
for recycling

__________________

More conservative
tionalist leaders in

black na-
Salisbury

D+aily Official Bulletin
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student oreanization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone'764-9270.
Wednesday, February 9, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM :- Program about Margaret
Mitchell, author Gone With the
Wind, Ancluding readings from her
letters and an interview with Rich-
ard Harwell. Author of The Gone
With the Wind Letters, 10 a.m.
Dept. Ind./Op. Eng.: Ms. Joyce
Elam, U. of. Texas. "A Generalized
Network Alternating Path Primal
Extreme Point Algorithm," 229 W. E.,
4 p.m. .
Statistics: Christine Waternaux,
"Test For Sphericity in the Non-
Normal' Case," 3227 Angell Hall, 4
p.m.
Global Awareness Series: Rev.
Frisco Gilchrist, Friendship Mission.
Paraguay, "The U.S. In Latin Ameri-
ca," Aud. A, Angell, 4 p.m.
Museum of. Anthropology: Jane'
Buikstra, Northwestern U., "Wood-
land Adaptation: A Bio-Cultural
Perspective of the Prehistoric Mid-
west," Lee. Rm. II, MLB, 4:10 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 763-4117
Camp Echo Lake, Coed, N.Y. Will
interview here Mon.-Tues., Feb. 14-
15 from 1 to 5 each day. Openings
include Waterfront (WSI) Director
25 or up. Instrs. for equatic sports,
tennis, gymnasts, craft instr. and
general staff. Details available. Reg-
ister in person or by phone.

more Americans lost their jobs
in January than were reported
by the U. S. Labor Department,,
a private research firm says.
The Sindlinger & Co. also
said true unemployment for
last Wednesdaytwas 11.6 per
cent, or more than 11 million
persons out of work, and that
unemployment actually rose 1
per cent from December, while
the Labor Department reported
January unemployment had
dropped one-half of 1 per cent.
The government failed to ac-
count for those who lost jobs
due to the severe cold weather
because it used data taken be-
fore the harsh weather began,
Sindlinger & Co. said in a
newsletter.
Government calculating meth-
ods and the use of incomplete
data also contributed to the in-
accurate unemployment pic-
ture, Sindlinger said.
There was no immediate re-
'action from the Labor -Depart-
ment.-
Sindlinger'-s surveys for Jan.1
12 to Feb. 2 showed 3.3 millionI

But the edge of the shortage
was being softened this week as
'small additional supplies of na-
tural gas began flowing into in-
terstate pipelines under provi-
sions of the new emergency act
that President Carter signed
last Wednesday.
The Federal Power Commis-
sion (FPC) said Monday that
some 380 million cubic feet of
gas per day already was flow-
ing under new emergency ar-
rangements and another 175
million, cubic feet a day was
authorized and awaiting com-
pletion of connecting pipes.
The extra gas, transferred
from western areas with better
supplies or purchased tempor-
arily at prices above federally
regulated ceilings, represents
only about one per cent of the
gas required on a cold winter
day.
But it helps, and so does some
933 million cubic feet already
flowing daily under earlier FPC
emergency rules.

PHILO RECORD'S
OWEN
McBRIDE

FRI.-SAT.

I

$3.00

Send her the
LoveBundem
Bouquet for
Weekend.

He's back again with his
usual mixture of rowdy
Irish songs, soft ballads,
outrageous jokes, rebel
y e II s and scurrilous
stories.

WASHINGTON - Supporters
of tough controls on strip min-
ing appear to be nearing the
end of a six-year effort to get
their views enacted into law.
Interior secretary Cecil An-
drus pledged the support of
the Carter administration to the
THE MICITlGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 108
Wednesday, February 9, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i I y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept, thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

I

LEONARD BERNSTEIN'S
MASS
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY by the
Howard Hangar Performers
Tuesday, Feb. 15-7:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR'S
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
STATE & HURON STS.
Ticket donations for non-students are $3, $2 donation for
students; ($2 non-students and $1.50 students for groupsĀ°-
of 15 or more ordered in advance) from the Wesley
Foundation, in person or by mail. 602 E. Huron St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48108.
Tickets and more information 9-12 & 12:30-3 week-
days. 668-6881.

THURS., FEB. 10:
PETER "MADCAT" RUTH and his magic harp

$1.50
8:30

I 1421 HILL

761-1451

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)etroits
)riginal
enaissance
enterĀ°
nvitesC
oilu !

UAC Wants

You!

to be a S e n i o r Officer of the Unverstyi
Activities Center for the 1977-78 school

Probably not. All things considered you do
what you do pretty doggone well. After all, no one
has taken your job. And you're eating regularly.

But...

year.

Four students are needed to fill the posi-

tions of President, Financial

Vice-Presi-

dent, Public Relations Vice-President, and

Thi
:em
in1c
Den

} New
alleries
"ALIAN WING
ith
EN AISSANCE
ASTERS
gird largest collection
side Europe-I 3th-I 8th
nturies newly displayed
completely re-designed
rmanentgalleries.

Co-ordinating Vice-President.
Applications are available at
the University Activities Center,.

But have you ever considered what doing your
job just a little better might mean?
Money. Cold hard coin of the realm.
If each of us cared just a smidge more about
what we do for a living, we could actually turn that
inflationary spiral around..Better products, better
service and better management would mean savings
for all of us. Savings of much of the cash and frayed
nerves its costing-us now for repairs and inefficiency
Point two..By taking more pride in our work
we'll more than likely see America regaining its
strength inthe competitive world trade arena. When
the balance of payments swings our way again we'll
all be better off economically.
So you see-the only person who canreally
do what you do any better is you.

2nd floor, Michigan Union
For further information call

a.,.

Premiere:
our Renaissance masterpieces
bequeathed by

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