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February 08, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-08

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Arts & Entertainment

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Tuesday, February 8, 1977

Page Five

Summer Study Programs

I1

Mr
By PAUL SHAPIRO
[ OOKING DRAWN and over-
weight, Charles Mingus led
his quintet (minus one) onto the
stage of the Union Ballroom Fri-
day night and proceeded to play
100 minutes of intricate, sophis-
ticated, and excellent jazz. Soft-
ly introducing his players-Ric-
ky Ford on tenor saxaphone,
Jack Walrath on trumpet, Bob
Neloms on piano--Mingus made
no mention ofabsent drummer
Dannie Richmond and played in
such a. convincing style that the
lack of drums carried little im-
portance.
The opening composition,
"Blues For Pork Pie Hat," is
a Mingus tribute to the late
tenor saxophonist Lester Young.
Simply, this is the most beauti-
ful melody . Mingus has com-
posed to date. The Workship
(his band's formal name) per-
formed an extended version in
a serious and traditional mode
that one rarely witnesses at jazz
concerts these days. The piece
has been restructured as to al-
low numerous solos from all the
players, a Mingus trademark
(one side player once remark-
ed, "he had more confidence in
what we were capable of then
we had."
Neloms plays a driving rhyth-
mic piano. Although he is a re-
cent addition to the quintet, his
role in keying !transitibns
throughout all the compositions
(especially considering the ab-
sence of Richmond) cannot be

Excellent ive

jazz

in FRANCE (La
and in SPAIN (5C
2ND AND 3RD YEA
FOR U OF M C

Rochelle)
Salamanca)
R COURSES
REDIT

understated.
RICKY FORD'S tenor solo was
particularly pleasing. He is a
young musician, but very much
grounded in an older style of
playing less notes and putting
a greater weight on selectivity.
Jack Walrath on trumpet blew
a rather lengthy solo of mixed;
quality. His music suffers from
a lack of inventiveness, and too
often he misses on his attempts
at high notes.
Mingus was transe - like#
throughout the piece, and the!
entire concert as well. His solo!
had calm air about it, laced:
with an occasional Mingus grunt
or hum. Bow in hand, he con-
ducted the players to a smooth
conclusion of the composition.
THE SECOND PIECE, "Peg-
gy's Blue Skylight" featured Ne-
loms on piano. It spanned a
wide range of musical influen-
ces from bebop and swing to
cool and avant garde. Mingus
has studied jazz thoroughly,
but has studied classical and
modern as well, listing Beethov-
en, Debussy, Ravel, and Stra-!
vinsky as some of the major
influences on his work.
The Duke Ellington "Sound
of Love" followed, holding a
sweeping, gentle quality to the
music. Ricky Ford played al
long, winding solo on sax, shap-
ing notes and phrases that show-
ed the great promise of his abil-
ities.
Of most importance though,l
was the subtle authority Mingus

holds on bass. His personal tech-
nique is a result of years of
playing, knowing, understand-
ing. Again his solo had a quiet
intensity to it, yet the listener
was always aware that Mingus
in is command of his music.
THE FINAL COMPOSITION,
"Sue's Changes," was taken
from Mingus's most recent al-
bum. Lasting approximately
thirty minutes, it contained the
highest momentsof the eve-
nings music. At times the play-
ers were connecting in a way
that brings out the best in jazz
improvisation;dthey were listen-
ing clearly and playing respons-
es directly to each other with
a furious strength.
"Sue's Changes" embodies so
much music, and the changes
within it are so radical, that it
is a good piece to end a set
with. When Mingus is through,
you are ready to go home.
Each of the musicians did sev-

eral extended solos, Neloms
again playing with much power.
His music was so together that
it caused even the mighty Mm-
gus to let loose with a smile.
Walrath and Ford played in
much freer and original mpdes,
Ford blowing with particularly
interesting tonal qualities. And
then there was Mingus, always
on top of the music, bowing
his bass slowly to the concerts'
end.
artistic ritinq?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewig
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories about the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
MichignDiy

INFORMATION MEETING:
February 16, 1977-
4-5:30 p.m.
Lecture Room 2, MLB
Courses, travel arrangements, accommoda-
tion, fees, etc., will be discussed
For More Information Contact:
DEPT. OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES
4108 MLB, 764-5344

I
i
i

EVERYONE WELCOME!

P-

m

wmmmwiw

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Charles Mingus, calm and sophisticated as usual, leads
his quintet in an excellent jazz performance last Friday
night.

Breakfast All Day
3 Eqqs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.35
Ham or Bacon or Sousage
with 3 Eqqs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.95
3 Eqas, Ribe Eve Steak,
Hash Browns, Toast &
J eln--$2. 25
We make Three Eqq Omlets
-Western Omlet
-Bean Sprout Omlet

EVERYDAY SPECIALS
Beef Stroqa-ioff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Eaq Rolls
Home-made Soups, Beef,
Barlev, Clom Chowder, etc.
Home-made Chili
Veetable Tempuro
(served after 2 p.m.)
Homburger Steak Dinner-
Spaghetti in Wine Suce
Beef Currv Rice
Baked Flounder" Dinner
Delicious Korean Bar-b-q Beef
(Bul-ko-gee) on Kaiser Roll
Fried Fresh Bean Sprouts
Kim-Chee

P amoni plays with spirit

By REBECCA SEGAL string sections and sudden per- winds were prominent, and
THURSDAY night's concert by cussive outgursts. The work were played well. Occasionally
the University Philhar- was played tensely and well. A ' the strings were a little weak,
monia was a fine performance composition like this is very as if the orchestra were grow-
that displayed good technical challenging to play because its ing tired, but overall they re-
ability together with stylistic chaotic structure is difficult to taied the vigor and precision
excellence. The orchestra was 1 keep in order. of the first two movements.
under the baton of Clark Suttle, After intermission, the or- IN THE FOURTH movement
whose musical interpretation of chestra played Tchaikovsky's - andante maestro - allegro
the works performed was firm- 5th Symphony, a typically dra- -
ly based and perceptive. matic, heavyily romantic piece. vivace -. the orchestra began
The program consisted of Both first movement, An-dante- to seem somewhat tired. The
Weber's Overture to Oberon, a allegro con anima, and the sec- horns were less smooth 'at
modern work by Daniel Perlon- and, Andante. cantabile, were
go entitled Myriad, and Tchai- played with expression and
kovsky's 5th Symphony. 1 driving for.ce. The strings, es-
Th srteyjyfl od fpecially the cellos, were lush - 0 atlbry
The spritely, Joyful mood of and foil, and the brass played 'M [ -
the Weber overture was convey- with power and clarity. The cre-
ed well by the orchestra. The with p
piece, which begins quietly with scendos were smooth and T P 66540
notes from a french horn, soon strong. Under Suttle's direction,
takes off into a wild, spirited the timing was excellent, as Showtime 7-9
theme led by the strings. Tem- was the maintained sense ofw

times, and the pizzicatos for the
r first time were a little sloppy.
All in all, the audience at Hill
Auditorium on Thursday nightI
left well - satisfied with having
heard a fine concert. The Uni-
versity Philharmonia, the sec-
ond of the music school's two
orchestras, can be commended
for its outstanding performance.

HAPPENINGS,
763-1107
UAC WANTS FOUR GOOD PEOPLE
to be Senior Officers for the 1977-78 school year. Four
students are needed to fill the positions of President,
Financial Vice-President,-Public Relations Vice-President
& Co-ordinating Vice-President. The Senior UAC officers
have responsibility for the overall administration of the
University Activities Center, which is the primary enter-
ment and cultural programming body on campus. Inter-
ested students should pick up an'application and job
description at the UAC offices, 2nd Floor, Michigan
Union. The application deadline is February I, 1977.
JAZZ WITH TAJ MAHAL
in concert this Friday, February 11-two shows: 8:00
p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Tickets are $4.50, available at
the Michigan Union Box Office, Schoolkid's Records,
Discount Records, or WheteHouse Records in Ypsilanti.
THE ROBERT ALTMAN
FESTIVAL PRESENTS:
Saturday, Feb. 12--McCABE & MRS. MILLER, Aud. A,.
Angell Hall, 7:00 p.m. & 9:1'> p.m.
FEB. 17: SNEAK PREVIEW OF A FILM PRODUCED BY
ROBERT ALTMAN STARRING KEITH CARRADINE,
SALLY KELLERMAN, GERALDINE CHAPLIN, LAUREN
HUTTON, SISSY SPACEK AND RICHARD BASKIN
ALAN RUDOLPH, the director, will discuss the film after
its screening. Alan Rudolph was assistant director for the
following Altman films: The Long Goodbye, California
Split, and Nashville. He co-wrote the screenplay for
Buffalo Bill & the Indians.
Admisison is $3.50. The filtn will start promptly at
6:00 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
ADVANCE TICKETS will go on sale Feb. 10,.Thursday,
at UAC Ticket Central in the Michigan Union. The
Rudolph sneak preview is also part of the screening pass
which will admit you to the following Altman films:
McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Images, The Long Goodbye,
Thieves Like Us, California Split, Nashville and Buffalo
Bill & the Indians. The all screening pass is now avail-
able for $10.00. You save $2.75 and are guaranteed a
seat for the exclusive preview.

j-!gw

Monday-Friday 8-8
Saturday 9-8
Sunday 10-8
769-2288

I

1313 So. University

po and precision were kept up
well. The brass section and
cellos, especially, were clear
and expressive.
THE NEXT WORK on the
program was Myriad, annex-
tremely modern, harsh, grating,
piece with some strange, whiny

tension and drama, particularly
in the second movement. The
strings were also very compe-
tent in the pizzicato parts.
The third movement, a valse
-allegro moderato, was played
very romantically. The wood-

1MHOES
lOFA
SUMMEI

AVANT GARDE FILM
LECTURE SERIES...

---

Showtime 7-9

Brings you PETER KUBELKA and his works of art in
film-Friday, February 11, 1977 at the Nat. Sci. Audi-
torium, 8 p.m. Tickets: $1.50 each.
MEDIATRICS Presents..
SHERLOCK HOLMES SMARTER BROTHER-Saturday,
February 12-$1.25. Nat. Sci. Auditorium, 7:00-8:45-
10:30 p.m.
Who cares about Josh, Harold is coming?
UAC MUSKET
Presents
THE MUSIC MAN
America's Marching Musical
MARCH 31--APRIL 3

I )iit'*' Y I rY' 4 -
. ~ 0

Showtjme 7-9

11

F,

Iq

Do You Have
A Favorite Faculty Member
OR
Graduate Teaching Assistant?
Nominate him or her for one of the following awards:
TEACHING ASSISTANT AWARDS-
Up to ten awards given for effectiveness and creativity as a
teacher.
SERVICE AWARDS-
Up to six awards to instructors, assistant professors, or junior
associate professors with no more than four years in rank, for out-
standing contributions to the life of the study body as a teacher'
and counselor.
ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS-
Up to five awards for associate to full professors for distinguished
achievement-broadly defined-in teaching, research and service.
AMOCO GOOD TEACHING AWARDS -
Up to five awards for associate and full professors who have
achieved a record of excellence in undergraduate instruction.

Tickets on Sale Now?

M

tol O
ac RV Cs

Group Rates Available

Anxious

MUSICAL MONTAGE
A Magical Fantasy is IComing l
UAC is proud to announce it's first Musical Montage.
Mass Meeting Feb. 22. Auditions Feb. 24, 25
WORLD PREMIERE
PRODUCTIONS ...
A Theatre group designed to produce original scripts;
they are still acceptingsubmissions of original manu-
scripts.for consideration. Deadline is February 11, 1977.
Writers Workshop 2:00 p.m. on Sunday starting Feb.
13 at Guild House.
Songwriters Workshop 7:30 p.m. on Monday starting
Feb. 7 at Guild House, located on the corner of Monroe
and Oakland. For further information, call 763-1107.
UAC TRAVEL Presents ...
Cheap Spring Break Trips to HAWAII, ACAPULCO!
JAMAICA! CANCUNT Includes round trip air transpor-
tation and hotel accommodations.
Also, charter fare is availale to New York, Boston,
Newark, Philadelphia and Ft. Lauderdale.
Signup Deadline: February 4
For further information contact UAC Travel at 763-
2147
UAC's TICKET CENTRAL...
Main lobby, Michigan Union}
Ticket Central's experienced Box Office personnel will
take away your ticket selling problems and worries-

about
studying, -test-taking
and the hassles
that go with it?

r

Check out AARG!

DESIGNED:
0 as a series of free workshops

" to teach techniques of
_ 1 A _. . , I .-r tr

II

In)

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