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February 08, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-08

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Tuesdoy, February 8, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tu ..,Fbray8 97 H ,HIA AL

DAILY

DIGEST

FEBRUARY 8, 1977

I

International Israeli

Soviet spaceship
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
launched two cosmonauts into
orbit yesterday aboard a space-
ship that was expected to dock
with the space laboratory, Sal-
yut-5, within the next two days.
First reports indicated that the
mission would be routine, al-
though it was presented on tele-
vision here as a major new So-
viet triumph in space explora-
tion.
The Salyut laboratory,
launched last June, has been
boarded once before in space by
the two crew members of the
Soyuz-21 mission who spent most
of July and August inside the
device conducting experiments.
Rhodesian
massacreI
SALISBURY - Seven white
Roman Catholic missionaries, in-
cluding four nuns, were lined up
and shot in a guerrilla attack
that stunned Christian church
groups in Rhodesia and brought
an expression of "profound
grief" from Pope Paul VI.
Officials said it was the worst
group killing of whites in four
years of war by black guerril-
las against Rhodesia's white
government.
The one survivor of the shoot-
ing said three German Domini-
can nuns, an English Domini-
can nun, two Jesuit missionaries
from Germany and a lay broth-
er from Ireland were executed
inside the compound of their
mission school north of Salisbury
on Sunday night by guerrillas
who argued about who would
do the shooting.
"They did not say one word
about why. they were doing this
to us," said Father Dunstant
Mverscough, an English Jesuit
who said he threw himself to
the ground when the guerrillas
onened fire. "When one of the
sisters asked what they wanted,
one of them said, 'We want our
country.'
Daily Offiial Bulltin
Tuesday, February 8, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: An interview with Wayne
Dyer, author of Your Erroneous
Zones, by Andy Marlow, KUOM,
Minn., 10 a.m.
Cellular/Molecular Biology: Louis
Siminovitch, Medical Genetics, U.
of Toronto, "Selection ad CreC-
terizatlon of Mutants of Somatic
Mammalian Cells," a. Le. Hal,
Med. Sc. II, 3 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: Robert Guern-
sey, Columbid U., "Superfluid He3
New Measurements of Viscosity and
Superfluid Fraction, 2038 Randall
Lab.; M. Abduwahab, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, "Theory of
Supernovae Spectra," P & A Collo-
quim Rm., 4 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 763-4117
Camp Echo Lake, Coed, N.Y. Will
interview here Mon.-Tues., Feb. 14-
15 from 1 to 5 each day. Openings
include Waterfront (WSI) Director
25 or up. Instrs. for aquatic sports,
tennis, gymnasts, craft instr. and
general staff. Details available. Reg-
ister in person 'or by phone.

impatience
Israeli Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon said yesterday his coun-
try has only limited patience
waiting for the United States to
get Syria to pull back troops in
Lebanon now eight miles from
the Israeli border.
Allon expressed his impatience
as United Nation's, Secretary-
General Kurt Waldheim arrived
in Lebanon on his Mideast tour
to reactivate the Arab-Laeli
peace talks in Geneva.
The top U.N. offici'al denied
any intention to compete with
American efforts to get Israel
and the Arab countries ba:k to
the negotiating table this spring.
"On the contrary, the United
Nations is cooperating and co-
ordinating with the cosponsors
of the Geneva conference,"
Waldheimsaid at a news con-
ference on arrival from Saudi
Arabia.
The Lebanese were expected
to demand international guaran-
tees of the security of their
southern border with Israel as
their price for joining in the
Geneva talks.
For the past two weeks Syrian
peacekeeping forces have occu-
pied .the town of Nabatiyeh,
eight miles from the border. Is-
'raeli officials said this puts Sy-
rians over the so-called "red
line" marking the limit beyond
which the Israeli government
will not tolerate Syrian forces,
and the U.S. Embassy in Beirut
has been seeking a Syrian pull-
back.
National
USW vote
PITTSBURGH - One of the
most bitterly contested labor
election campaigns in years
ends today when the 1.4 million-
member United Steelworkers
chooses a successor to retiring
President I. W. Abel.
Heading the administration-
backed slate is Lloyd McBride,
60, a conservative union veteran
pledged to the USW's moderate
policies.I
He faces 38-year-old Edward
Sadlon"ki, a militant who says
the union has grown soft and
too willing to accommodate cer-
poration bosses.
The election's outcome will af-
fect not only the direction of the
union but may also have major
implications for the nation's
economy
The USW is the largest unit
of the AFL-CIO and often sets
THE MICHIGAN PA ILV
Volume LXXXVII, No. 107
Tuesday, February 8, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
nad at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

the pattern for other unions. An }
abrupt shift in USW policy
could have far-reaching impact
in other industries.
Lay - of fs
WASHINGTON - Between 1 2
million and 1.57 million persons
-most of them in Ohio and New
York - have been laid off their
jobs because of the natural gas
shortage, new federal and. state
reports indicate.
A report given to White House
energy advisor James Schlesin-
ger over the weekend shows gas-
shortage unemployment in at
least 17 states, ranging from
about 1,000 each in Mississippi
and Wisconsin to an estimated
250,000 in New York and 550,000
to one million in Ohio. The re-
port is based on estimates pre-
pared by the Commerce Depart-
ment and by state agencies.
Beached whales
MAYPORT, Fla. - At least 41
dead pilot whales were counted
yesterday at Fort George Inlet,
where a herd of the mammals
returned to the beach persistent-
ly despite human efforts to
shove them back to sea.
About 20 divers plunged into
the water in an effort to head
off 40 to 50 whales trying to
come ashore against the falling
tide, said Lt. Glenn Keefer of
the Florida Marine Patrol.
"They are kind of in a frenzy
out there, both our people and
the whales," he said.
Keefer said as many as 100
whales may have died since
Sunday on the shore and a sand-
bar 200 yards out in the inlet at
the mouth of the St. Johns River
east of Jacksonville.
"It's difficult to say exactly
how many because some have
washed back out to sea," Keefer
said. "Some are on the beach
covered with sand and others
are on sandbars."
After similar beachings of
whales in the Florida Keys and

spinner dolphin at Sarasota and In a speech at the- Detroit
Fort Myers last year, mario3 of- Economic Club, the former pres-
ficers and scientists said an in- idential advisor said the $50 in-
ner ear parasite that damages dividual rebates will fall snort
sensitive natural sonar and equi- ( of meaningful stimulus for tne
librium equipment in the marm- economy, while a tax reduction
mals' bodies could have cuscd could show dramatis, results by
the behavior. the end of the year.
They said whales infected with "The President's fiscal pro-
the parasite apparently try to posals are not subject to cr.ti-
get their bearings by beaching cism because of their size,"
themselves. McCracken said, "since in any
Sometimes the leaders of ac theecondyear's install-
herd may be the only ones in- case te ld be deactivated l
fected, scientists said, but other ment cou .
members follow them to shore "But the pattern of the pro-
in an attempt to help. posals does deserve criticism."
, McCracken said that instead
Seafarer promise of rebates and further complica-
tion of business tax laws as pro-
WASHINGTON-Senator Rob- posed by Carter, the administra-
ert Griffin (R-Mich), called on tion should instead redefine busi-
President Carter yesterday to ness profits subject to tax in
follow through on a campaign s prfits sujet holtxen
promise and find a location oth- simplified language while en-
er than in Michigan for 1he acting a general tax cut.
Navy's Seafarer program.
Griffin said Car.er made the Fitzsimmon' s
commitment not to build the
proposed Seafarer programn
which would set u an under-
ground submariae communica- DETROIT - Richard Fitzsim-
tions grid across Michigan's Up- Imoons, son of Teamsters Union
per Peninsula if local residents!
were against it.
The Michigan Senator said,
"Unless we are to assume that
Mr. Carter did not mean what
he said, I see no reason to pro-"
long the agony."
He said a referenda taken last

'
r
i
2
I
i
2

President Frank Fitzsimmons,
was freed on $10,000 bond yes-
terday after arraignment on
federal charges of embezzling!
union pension money to buy life
insurance.
Fitzsimmons, vice president
of Teamsters Local 299, surren-
dered to FBI agents prior to the
U.S. Magistrate Court appear-
ance.
Also surrendering yesterday
was co-defendant Anthony Sci-
arotta, a former Local 299 busi-
ness agent.
The younger Fitzsimmons and
Sciarotta stood mute before
Judge Paul Komives and had a
plea of innocent entered for
them on a charge of illegal con-
version of union funds.
-Accompanied by attornSys,
each defendant posted $10,000!
personhl bonds and quickly left
the downtown federal building
without making a statement.
U.S. Attorney Philip Van Dam:
said the case is merely part of
a larger investigation into un-
ion activities in the Detroit area.

Peeved pair
picket eatery
(Continued from Page 2)
inside the restaurant, he could send a friend in to get a
cup of coffee for him which he would then drink in full
view of Miller.
"THE GIRL'S A FUNNY TYPE," Thompson added.
Miller, who has managed the submarine shop "on
and off for about four years," ,said with a smile that
the picketers "know perfectly well why they aren't al-
lowed m here."
She said the pair, and about ten others who have
been told of their ouster, were "troublemakers."
SPECIFICALLY,. SHE SAID, the two picketers had
frequently used the restaurant for a meeting place, had
employed obscene language and had "hassled" the per-
sonnel.
In her work at Mr. Tony's, Miller said she had been
hit, spit on, cursed at and even threatened, and she had
decided to take action against the offenders.
"SHE'S NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE from me,"
Thompson declared. "I've been around here for 27 years.
Thompson and Rewoldt said they brought complaints
of discrimination before the Washtenaw County Human
Rights Department, but "they won't do anything about
it."
The department acknowleged the restaurant's serving
policy was discriminatory, but said it was a type of dis-
crimination which is perfectly legal.
"THERE'S NO CRIME INVOLVED in this case," said
John Knapp, Director of the Consumer Action Center,
which also received the picketers' complaints. Knapp said
the charge of discrimination may merit a civil suit, but
"I don't think we're ever going to get anywhere."
Meanwhile, Thompson and Rewoldt plan to continue
their attempts at starting a boycott of Mr. Tony's.
"I just want to see this thing straightened out,"
Thompson said. "What else can I do?"
Miller said she doesn't plan to stop the picketing
"as long as they don't block the entrance." And the'
complaints don't seem to be hurting business at the res-
taurant.
"In some ways," the manager said, "it's helped us."

Save and bundle
old newspapers
for recycling

year showed ra-sidents over-
whelmingly agaiist the project.
State
Reductions

T

favored
DETROIT - University Edn-
omist Paul McCracken said yes-
terday that the Carter adminis-
tration's income tax rebate pIai
is well intentioned but should be
scrapped in favor of ?ixlable tcoi
reductions for individuals ard
businesses.

Possibly the most unusual music news in some time is
the cancellation of the massive Jeff Beck Concert Tour
scheduled for the winter 1977. Beck, who last week
sold out his scheduled Ann Arbor appearance on
February 27, has created quite a stir among agents,
promoters and fans across the country. A cancellation
of this magnitude is quite peculiar. Details are sketchy;
however it seems the band had been pushed to their
limit through contstant touring. Ticket refunds are avail-
able at the Michigan Union Box Office in Ann Arbor
(11:30-5:30, Mon.-Fri.). Tickets purchased at Hudsons
may be refunded at Hudsons.
Eclipse Jazz will be presenting today's foremost blues
and reggae performer, Taj Mahal on Friday, February
11 at.8:00 P.M. and 10:30 P.M. in the"Michigan Union
Ballroom. Tickets are $4.50 (general admission) and
available at the Michigan Union Box Office.
Todays FLASH prepared by Jim Duprey

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With several successes behind
us, the U-M Jewish Community
brings you another GRAD HAPPY
H 0 U R. Popular mixed drinks
($.50), free munchies.
EVERYONE IS WELCOME
WED., FEB. 9-4:30-6:30
1429 Hill Street

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DANCING TO LIVE BANDS

Leningrad ,Symphony Orchestra

AT THE
NO COVER
DRESS sagoalwood
CASUAL DRESS RESTAA E
-ALSO-

7.
NIGHTS
A WEEK
LADIES NIGHT
TUESDAY & THURSDAY
High
atop
the

YURI TEMIRKANOY, Conductor; ELISO VERISOLADZE, Pianist
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10 AT 8:30, HILL AUDITORIUM
One of the world's great orchestras comes to Ann Arbor this week as
part of its first American tour, after receiving high acclaim all over the
Soviet Union. Yuri Temirkanov, Music Director since 1969, has con-
ducted the major Soviet orchestras and made guest-conducting appear-
ances in this country with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Cincinnati Sym-
phony, and San Francisco Symphony. Eliso Verisoladze is also making
her'first American tour after successful performances throughout her
country and in Eastern and Western Europe.
PROGRAM:
MOZART: PIANO CONCERTO NO. 15 IN B-FLAT, K. 450
SHOSTAKOVICH: SYMPHONY NO. 7 (written in 1941 and dedicated
to the enemy-occupied city of Leningrad)

JAZZ
IN OUR 1st FLOOR
.PUB
FRI. AND SAT. EVES.

I

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