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February 06, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-06

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Page Two

THE MJCNIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 6, 1917

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LUNCH DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, FEB. 8 - 12 NOON
THE HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY
Speaker: BILL WILCOX
HRP Candidate, Ann Arbor City Council
Ecumenical Campus Center
921 CHURCH STREET
75c -- Food prepared and served by ,
Church Women United in Ann Arbor

CAC fights for consumers

r

I I

4

(Continued from Page 1)
business transactions. A recent
CAC survey showed that theI
lowest complaint rate is in the
central campus area.
Although Knapp said he feels
the student community is more
aware of its consumer rights,
he suggests that they have no
knowledge of CAC.
"STUDENTS do not do as
much buying as do other seg-
ments of our population, but
they should be just as cautious
as anyone in spending their
money."
Knapp falso said a largepor-
tion of a student's budget is
used for food purchases and
rent. To avoid hassles with lo-
cal merchants, Knapp recom-
mends that before a major pur-
chdse is made a consumer
should call the CAC to find out
about the firm's complaint rec-
ord.
Most of the CAC's clients have
THIS 15 IT!
TOMORROW NIGHT
JACK WHITE
in the
UNION BALLROOM
4:00 pkm. & 8:00 p m.
FREE
POCKET BILLIARD
EXHIBITION

complaints about auto dealers,
and repair shops, but the crea-
tion of the state Bureau of Auto-
motive Regulation has lessened
those concerns.
MOST of the Center's staff
members are volunteers, and
most of those are Univerjity
students working for two credit
hours as part of Project Out-
reach.
"It's very personalized .he e,
said .Cindy Leiberman, a junior
majoring in political science.
"We work on a one-to-one bnsis
with the consumer. We spare
them the trouble of hassling
with the bureaucratic red tape.
The CAC is one agency that
really helps people."
Bob Stulber, an economics
major, agrees.
"I HAVE learned to be sym-
nathetic to consumers," he said,
"while at the same time, learn-
ing to aunreciate the concerns
of the businessman."
Knano praised the enthusiasm
and comnetence of the student
volunteers. "They are fresh and
eager to tackle the problems.
whereas an old-timer -t the job
ePts burned out and jaundiced."
The only drawback to efficiency'
is the element of chaos that is
inherent when five student,; have
to share one desk and cre
Oho-e.
"B't whatever chaos there
is," Knanu added, "it's well
worth it!"
CAC was founded by five Uni-
versity students. They had
worked in the summer Washing-
ton Internship program in a
ronsimer 'complaint agency

supported by the Georgetown
University law clinic and a tele-
vision station.
Enthusiastic about their ex-
perience, they approached the!
University Law School for aid
in establishing a simialr pro-
gram here. The University
turned them down, so they ap-
pealed to the Ann Arbor Cham-
ber of Commerce, who fur-
nished them with a room and
$3,000 to begin operations.
The new facility was soon'
swamped with complaints, and
Knapp applied for a federal
grant to expand services. The
center received a $38,000 grantj
and was supplied with office
space by the county in 1973.
Ball may
lose job
in P i BB
scandal
DETROIT (UPI) The no-
litical wing of the United Auto
Workers has called for the re3ig-1
nation of State Agriculture Di-
rector B. Dale Ball because of
his handling of the PBB s.:andal
in the state.e
At a Lansing meeting of the
union's Community Action Pro-
gram Friday, members ap-
proved a resolution accusing thel
denartment and other state of-'
ficials, including Gov. William
Milliken, of bungling the PBB
case.
THE TOXIC fire retarrientt
was accidentally mixed into live-
stock feed in 1973, resulting in]
the death or destruction of hun-
dreds of farm animals. Studiese
are under way to assess the ef-
fects of the contamination on hu-
mans.
The resolution accused Ball of
"failure to protect the henith of
the people of Michigan." It also
said Milliken's administration
had a "long record of negligen-
cy and incompetence" in hand-
ling the matter.f
The state Public Health De-1
partment also drew fire in rhe I
resolution that accused thatt
agency of covering up damaging
evidence about the hazards arid
extent of the contamination.

Gardner quits
Common Cause
WASHINGTON (AP) - John Gardner, founder
and chairman of Common Cause, said yesterday
he is quitting his post with' the citizens' politi-
cal action group.
"Every organization must renew itself," Gard-
ner said in an'nouncing his resignation to the or-
ganization's governing board at a meeting in
Washington.
GARDNER, WHO HAS SERVED two three-year
terms as Common Cause chairman, said he would
head a 10-member committee to search for a spc-
cessor.
David Cohen, president of the organization who
assumed Gardner's duties as a chief executive
officer last year, is a member of the commit-
tee and considered a prospect to take over.
Gardner, 64, said he would not seek re-elec-
tion when his term expires in April but that
he would continue as a member of -the board.
His board term expires next year.
Gardner founded Common Cause in the fall of
1970, saying he hoped to create a citizens' voice
in the political field.

Gardner

SEARCH FOR DESERTERS COS TLY:
Study slams AWOL policy

1

I¢ the World
wants the
Jews Dyad

The Jewish Community Centers of Chicago
OFFERS
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTU N ITIES
SOCIAL WORK ORIENTED COUNTRY CAMP
CAMP-CHI-located 50 miles north of Madi-
son & the University of Wisconsin.
POSITIONS: Counselors-,male & female.
SPECIALISTS: Tennis, Sailing, Music, Senior
Adult Program Staff, Camp Craft.
UNIT HEAD: Male & female.
INTERVIEW DATES: Call for appointment
February 15th, Tuesday-Call the Hillel Office, 663-3336,_
1429 Hill Street
February 16th, Wednesday-Call Mrs. Cooper (SAB) RM.
3200 at 763-4117

WASHINGTON (P) - The
congressional audit agency
says "it makes little sense" to
spend millions of dollars hunt-
ing down military deserters be-
cause most of them eventually
are expelled from the 'armed
services anyway.
The General Accounting Of-
fice (GAO) of Congress sug-
gested that because of this,
Secretary of . Defense Harold
Brown should re-examine the
policy of treating military de-
serters as criminals in peace-
time.
THE GAO proposed that
Brown consider "stopping the
apprehension of deserters ex-
cept whenthe individual is
wanted for some specific pur-
pose, such asanother crime or
security matter, and discharge
them in absentia after they
have been absent for a stipulat-
ed period."
Or as an alternative, the GAO
said, the Defense Department
and the FBI could hold back on
"aggressive apprehension ef-
forts" until a deserter has
been gone long enough to indi-
cate that he is unlikely to re-
turn voluntarily.
The investigators dismissed
arguments by military officials
that treating deserters as

criminals deters other
men and women from
over the hill."

"THERE IS NO verifiable
evidence that soldiers who do
not desert are discouraged
from doing so because of fear
of becoming a military crimi-
nal," the report said.
The GAO study deals with
the future and says nothing
about the issue of extending
President Carter's pardon of
Vietnam-era draft - evaders to
military deserters of that per-
iod.
Desertion remains a problem
for the armed services even
though the war is overand,
young men no longer are draft-
ed. Officials are hpeful the:
problem will diminish if they
can improve the quality of vol-
unteers.
The- GAO report said the ser-

service-
-"going

vices classified about 84,000
military people as deserters in
1975 and 1976, after they were
absent from duty for more than
30 days.
The services spent almost $58
million to catch and process
these deserters "only to dis
charge most of them as un-
qualified for retention," the
GAO study said.
Most deserters do not become
"useful soldiers," the investiga-
tors found.
"They are unable or unwill-
ing to meet the standards de-
manded of a professional," the
report said. "Most are dis-
charged eventually for this
reason.
It makes little sense
to incur the cost of appre-hend-
ing deserters only to separate
them, particularly when many
avoid apprehension by return-
ing voluntarily."

Panel hits, U.S. aid
to political groups

I

WILL YOU BE A SILENT WITNESS?
presents
-FLMS-
THIRD DAY OF THE WAR, and
U.N. PROCEEDINGS: ANTI-ZIONIST
RESOLUTION
MON., FEB. 7-5:00 p.m.
Alice Lloyd North Cafeteria
NIGHT AND FOG
MON., FEB. 7-6:30 p.m., South Quad
NIGHT AND FOG,
TUES., FEB. 8-6:30 p.m., Baits I, Upstairs Lounge
NIGHT AND FOG
TUES., FEB. 8-10:00 p.m.
Hebrew House, 800 Lincoln
NIGHT AND FOG-
WED., FEB. 9-7:00 p.m.
Mary Markley Angela Davis Lounge
MOSCOW DOESN'T ANSWER, and
speaker: BORIS LANDA, Russian Jew
WED., FEB. 9-10:00 p.m., A E Pi, 1620 Cambridge
NIGHT AND FOG
THURS., FEB. 10-4:00 p.m., M L B Lecture Rm. 1
NIGHT AND FOG
THURS., FEB. 10-6:00 p.m.
East Quad Green Lounge
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
ISRAEL EMERGENCY FU,,FND
for further information call 663-3336

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WASHINGTON (P) - A Sen-
ate committee said yesterday
the United States should firmly
oppose international organiza-
tions that small countries use to
promote their own political
causes.
In some cases, the United
States should even withdraw its.
membership and -money from
such organizations, the report
said.
"MEMBERS have used inter-
national institutions to legitimize
and support favored causes such
as the Palestine Liberation Or-.
ganization and to embarrass and
condemn governments they op-
pose," the Senate Government
Operations Committee said in a
report.
"We must be firm in our op-
position to the wrongful use of
such organizations to promote
political or ideological causes.
Where U.S. efforts encouer
only abuse, we should withdraw
from the organization;" it con-
cluded.
In 1975, the U.S. contributed
more than $1 billion to about 65
international groups, such as the
United Nations Development
Program and the North Pacific
Fur Seal Commission, the com-
mittee said.
THEIR operations affect suZ h
things as the price Americans
pay for coffee, the Jleanliness of
beaches and the safety of air
lines.
Chairman Abraham Ribicoff
(D-Conn.), said the report was'
issued in preparation for over-
sight hearings next month on the
role of the United States n these

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organizations.
The report said the United
States has given these orgaa'ia-
tions low nriority and said that
has encour aged "other countries
to believe 1hat they may take
Positions hostile to the Uii.ed
States in the organizations with
little or no consequences."
IT ALSO questioned the effec-
tiveness of some o' the groups
and 'said major' problems in-
clude:
-Rapid and unsystematic
growth in the number. of inner-
national organizations, causipg
overlap and duplication.
-The absence of effective co-
ordination within the United Na-
tions of the activities sponsored
by its numerous organizations.
-"EXCESSIVE salary lewels"
for groups like the International
Monetary Fund, World Bank and
U.N. suecialized agencies.
-The apparent reluctan-e of
organizations to evaluate, their
own activities or adopt modern
management techniques that
would eliminate ineffective pro-
grams and excessive bureaucra-
cies.
Involvement in these groups
provides the U.S. with, a cnance
"to resolve important prcblems
in an increasingly .interdpend-
ent world such as tn the areas of
energy. the environment and the
safeeiarding of nuclear ma-
terial.
"BUT THIS :does not mean
that our policy toward all inter-
national organizations shotd be
the same, or 'that we in fact
should support each and every
international organizatio-n" it
added.
"Like every other U.S. g9ve"n-
ment expenditure, paymets to
nternational organizations must
be evaluated in the context of a
set of over-all priorities," .4he
committee concluded.
ADVERTISING
IN THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY
DOESN T

IA

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HAWAII (airfare and hotel)...... .$359
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ACAPULCO (airfare and hotel) ....... $349
CANCUN (airfare and hotel) ......$342.10

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