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February 04, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-04

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 4, 1977

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, February 4, 1977

Gas transfer begins

ii

(Continued from Page 1)
- White House Press Secre-
tary Jody Powell said admini-
stration officials are looking for
ways to assess natural gas in-'
dustry reports on profits and re-
serves to determine the extent
of any national fuel shortage.
Government energy agencies
now rely on industry-supplied
data toumeasure U.S. natural
gas resources.
ASKED IF CARTER doubted
those industry figures, Powell.
replied: "You have to question,
not in a pojorative sense, a!
whole range of assumptions and
facts" when dealing with the

energy shortage.
Frank Ikard, president of the
American Petroleum Institute,
later said the industry figures
are "as complete as possible
and unbiased." In the past,
checks by government agencies
"have confirmed the accuracy"
of industry estimates of petro-
leum reserves, Ikard said.
pf- The commission's Bureau
-NaturalGasreported some
pipelines again were on - the
-brink of having to cut off gas,
for top priority customers such
as homes and essential services.
BUT IT ADDED that "if con-
servation efforts continue and

the weather remains as fore-
cast, pipelines are expected to
meet essential priority one re-
quirements for the next two
days." That priority covers
homes and hospitals and keeps
water pipes from freezing.

No speedy end to
natural gas crisis

I

- A panel of governors told
Congress the harsh winter is
forcing millions of people to
choose between buying food
and buying fuel. The governors
urged federal action to help the
needy pay their soaring fuel
bills. A Library of Congress
study has estimated extra fuel
costs this winter could cost an
average of $139 per household.
Governors of Connecticut,
Pennsylvania and Kentucky and
the lieutenant governor of Mass-
achusetts said the poor, the un-
employed and those of fixed in-
comes are unable to cope with
the extra expenses and that
state funds to help them through
the winter are nearly exhausted.
i The natural gas shortages
of this winter are likely to con-
tinue to plague the nation in
coming years, according to nat-
ural gas producers and the in-
coming head of the Federal En-
ergy Administration.
"WE ARE CERTAINLY going
to have a pinch well into the
1980's" said David Foster, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Natural Gas Supply Committee,
an industry group.
John O'Leary, President Car-
ter's choice as administrator of
the FEA, was even more pessi-
mistic, saying natural gas short-
ages may become chronic and
increase in severity in the mid-
1980s unless strong fuel conser-
vation measures are taken.
The FPC's new regulations
immediately allow interstate
pipelines to purchase emergen-
cy gas until Aug. 31 at higher
prices than those normally per-
mitted by nationwide price ceil-
ings.

A News Analysis
HOUSTON (1') - The hardships caused by
the natural gas crisis will take longer to
heal than those brought about by the 1973-
74 gasoline shortage.
The long waiting lines at gasoline pumps
in late 1973 and early 1974 vanished after the
end of the Arab embargo on shipments of
crude oil to this country.
THE NATURAL gas crisis, however, won't
fade away so quickly.
'President Carter's emergency legislation
may ease this winter's crunch, but it will
not, as he acknowledges, correct a long-
standing supply problem.
In Washington, John O'Leary, the' incom-
ing head of the Federal Energy Adminis-
tration, said yesterday that natural gas
shortages may become chronic by 1985 un-
less strong fuel conservation measures are
followed. -
O'Leary, who said he was not speak-
ing for the President or White House energy
adviser James Scheslinger on the subject,
said even if additional gas fields are devel-
oped, the nation probably cannot produce
enough natural gas to- meet the increasing
demand.
THE NATURAL gas producers say they
have not spent money to bring in addi-
tional supplies because the federal govern-
ment has imposed regulations that force
them to sell gas for less than it costs them
to produce it.
Faced by declining reserves and produc-
tion, interstate pipelines for several years
already have been operating under curtail-

ment programs that have left sales far
short of demand.
Complicating the situation has been a
trend by many producers to contract their
gas to intrastate markets that offer higher
prices and are free of federal interstate reg-
ulations.
CARTER'S immediate options also are
restricted by his emergency legislation it-
self.
He can shift supplies from one interstate
pipeline to anothe*but he cannot shift gas
from the intrastate markets. The legislation
only authorizes voluntary intrastate sales to
the interstate lines.
The interstate pipeliners cannot bolster
their supplies simply by turning valves and,
unlike the oil companies, their prospects for
imports have been restricted to negligible
amounts from Canada and Mexico.
IT WAS announced yesterday that Mexico
wo'ild start shipping 40 million cubic feet
per day to the United States next week to
help ease the shortage. Until now, however,
Mexico's supplies to the United States have
been insignificant.
Once this winter's crunch has ended, de-
mand d'uring the spring and summer will
decline. But the pipeliners will be faced
with replenishing supnlies drawn from itheir
storage reserves during the cold weather
emergency period.
Storage withdrawals this season have
dwarfed those of recent years and the es-
sential job of replenishing could delay the
reopening of some industrial plants now
shut down.

Daily Photo by ALAN BILINSKY
GOVINDA'S EMPLOYES picket in protest of last week's
mass firing.
Govindas picketed,
manager amioy''ed

Bargain hunters find two-bit
treasures at Kiwanis sale

(Continued from Page 1)
Roseh also purchased a sailor
shirt and a vest for a mere Dit-

A

( "You can see all these people
grabbing things and it's really
crowded but everyone is nice,"
said Rosen. "Hippies can even
SEMINAR-WORKSHOP IN ZEN PRACTICE Despite the potpourri of of-
ferings, the sale was missing
SATURDAY, E.5one of the feature attractions
FEB. 5-10 A.M.4 P.M. from years before. According to
K U E NZ E L ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION the sale's- co-chairman, F. Hus-
/ ton "Tex" Colvin, "we've sold
CONTRIBUTION: $10 cars in other years. Neverthe-
Conducted by ZENSON SHAKYA, Ordained Priest of the Zen Center less," he added, "we're still do-
of Rochester, New York.
c ,eTONIGHT At
Please bring 2 blankets to serve as cushions for Zazen (Zen medita- SECOND CHANCE
tion) and wear loose fitting clothing.
__j"MUGSY"
FOR INFORMATION CALL: THE ANN ARBOR ZEN GROUP-665-0275 Further Info: 994-5350
516 E. LIBERTY

e
Y
,,
s
i,,
-i

ing something for people, andt
it's fun."
Kiwanis President Lee Blay-
lock, who boasted a gray-
brimmed hat with a name tag
proclaiming "Honest Lee", said
that University students were
some of his favorite patrons.
"PEOPLE SQUAWK and com-
plain and bitch about college
kids," he said, "but we accept
checks here and have yet to get
a bad check from the kids. I
think this is indicative of most
kids on campus.
"The sale is a real chance to
visit with the students," he said.
"We find they're the greatest
people in the world."
The profits from the 51st an-
nual sale will go to the commu-
nity 'to help fund 129. various
projects sponsored by the Ki-
wanis. The projects include 4-H
scholarships, Boy and Girl

Scouts and programs -for crip-
pled children.
The chief, recipient of the
funds is the C.S. Mott Children's
Hospital.
The sale is staffed by the 161
local Kiwanis members, their
families and friends. "We even
have ladies who come here ev-
ery year from Saline, Dexter
and Manchester to help out,"
said Blaylock.
The group also sponsors a one
day sale in September geared
toward returning college stu-
dents. According to Colvin, the
combined revenue. from both
sales last year was $45,000. He
estimated that the Kiwanis
would make $35,000 this year
with the present rummage sale.
Merchandise for the sale,
which started yesterday and
runs through Saturday after-
noon, was donated by people
throughout Washtenaw County.

(Continued from Page 1)
many people would want to go
back," Thompson stated.
Thompson indicated that pic-
keting would continue today,
but said the protest was "start-'
ing to lose momentum."
He said he hoped people
would consider management's

at Gavinda's, but denied his
group was seeking a consumer
boycott of the restaurant.,
Meanwhile, most former em-
ployees have applied for unem-
ployment benefits '┬░nd are seek-
ing new jobs, according to
T ompson He said a couple of
them had already found part-

actions before deciding to eat time jobs.

b SMA~

These Great New Releases
on Columbia/Epic Records-.

t 1 4OC

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Rock And Roll ('2)
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AP Phofo

SIX-YEAR-OLD LILLY LENAVITT sits out a number dur-
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sity of Toledo's Theater-Music Building. The children from
3 to 10 years old learn to play by listening to the notes,
rather than by reading music.

Sounds of silence

James Cotton join Muddy Waters on
his great new album. Look for Mud-
dy, Johnny and James together on
tour.

I

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