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February 02, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-02-02

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1Nednesdoy February 2, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, February 2, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three
I -

r

DAILY,
From Wire Service Reports
International
Americans quit
PANAMA CITY, Panama -
Twice as many Americans quit
their jobs with the Panama
Canal Co. in 1976 as in the pre-
vious year, apparently because
of worries over treaty talks be-
tween Papama and the United
States, company officials say.
"Any further encouragement
that there will be a new treaty
will increase the present turn-
over rate," said Gordon Frick,
personnel director for the com-
pany which runs the isthmian
waterway.
In 1976, Frick said, 290 U. S.
citizens resigned their jobs with
the Panama Canal Co., compar-
ed to 148 in 1975. Also, he said
resignations las year were up
57 per cent over the 1973-75 av-
erage.
He noted that the current sit-
uation has made it particularly
difficult for the canal company
to recruit and keep qualified
American doctors, nurses, and
engineers. Since last May, the
official said, 31 nurses, 14 pi-
lots, 35 craftsmen and nine pro-
fessional engineers have re-
signed.
In Washington on Monday,.
Panamanian Foreign Minister
Aquilin Boyd said Panama ex-
pects to win agreement on a
new treaty that will provide for
a complete U. S. withdrawal
from the Canal Zone by the turn
of the century.
Nuclear power
PARIS - The outgoing presi-
dent of the International Agen-
cy said yesterday the world
must use nuclear power to meet
its energy needs over the next
10 to 15 years despite public
concern about its safety.
"It is clear. The figures are
unfortunately there. We won't
meet the gap if we don't use
nuclear energy," Viscount Eti-
enne Davignon told a farewell
meeting with reporters. "We
can't run away from that."
Davignon said intensive re-
search and development must
continue into alternative energy
sources such as solar power,
but meanwhile nuclear energy1
will have to be used.I
Governments "must deal
with what is available now, andi
have an aggressive r and d re-I
search and development pro-
gram on top of it, but not in
lace of it," Davignon said.t
"We have to explain this timeI
and~time again."
Nationalt
Frigid benefitsl
WASHINGTON - The Labor
Department took special action<
yesterday to eliminate "red

DIGEST

FEBRUARY

2,

1977

tape" and speed payment of
unemployment insurance bene'
fits to thousands of workers
laid off in 18 eastern states be-
cause of the frigid weather and
fuel shortages.
Labor Secretary F. Ray Mar-
shall said all state employment
security offices in the area
were ordered to put into effect
an emergency mass-layoff pro-
cedure for handling claims, in-
cluding elimination of the one-
week delay normally required
before workers can collect bene-
fits.
Marshall also said he was
making available immediately
an additional $10 million under
a federal job training program
for the six hardest-hit states
to hire workers for emergency
programs such as snow remov-
al, fuel transportation, emer-
gency repairs, home insulation
work and removal of ice from
harbors and seaways.
States receiving the emer-
gency fund are New York, $3.3
million: New Jersey $1.5 mil-
lion; Pennsylvania, $2 million;
Ohio, $1.8 million; Maryland,
$617,000; and Virginia, $744,100.
Guerrilla
training
WASHINGTON - Tanzania,
one of the African countries U.
N. Ambassador Andrew Young
will visit this week, is allowing
Cuban troops to train black
Rhodesian guerrillas, U. S. in-
telligence sources say.
According to the analysts, Cu-
ban troops have moved from
Angola to Tanzania and Mozam-
bique to carry out the .training.
The movement of Cubans into
Tanzania is a new development.
The sources say about 200 of,
the Cubans are using Tanzania
to train and equip Rhodesian
blacks to fight against the white
minority regime.
Young was to fly to London
today on hs way to Tanzania
and Nigeria to show American
support for black African na-
tionalism, and to confer with
African leaders about the in-
tensifying Rhodesian crisis.
The presence of as many as
13,000 Cuban troops in Angola
was blamed by President Ger-
aid Ford and Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger for the victory
in Aunla of a hard-line Marx-
ist faction. Ford and Kissinger'
have warned against any ex-,
nRnsion of Havana's role in
Africa and ruled out any im-I
provement in U. S. Cuban re-I
lations as long as the troops re-,
mained in Africa.
President Carter and Secre-s
tary of State Cyrus R. Vance
have also indicated disanrov-I
al of the Cuban troops vresence,
in Angola, saying outside inter-
vention is not heloful and that1
an African solution should be
reached by Africans.
Young has shown a marked-
lv different view.
In an interview on CBS last
week, Young said "there's a
sense in which the Cubans bring
a certain stability and order]
to Angola."

Ethics policing
WASHINGTON - As other
witnesses sounded the need for
a tough ethics code to restore
public confidence, a {veteran
member of the Senate warned
his colleagues yesterday against
"too much policing" of legisla-
tors' private affairs and con-
duct.
Testifying before a special
Senate panel charged with de-
vising a new code of ethics,
Sen. John Stennis (D-Miss.)
said excessively strict rules
could hamstring senators m
their duties and discourage. oth-
er persons from seeking the of-
fice.
Several witnesses appearing
before' the Senate committee
observed that the current fer-

to abolish the committee com-
pletely while others wanted it
to have unlimited investigatory
power.
The rules panel agreed to curb
the previous. carte blanche the
committee had had to investi-
gate any assassination - not
just the Kennedy and King mur-
ders. It approved guidelines,
which must be adopted by the
full House, that would limit the
Assassinations Committee's sub-
pena power, require written
rules governing its work, and
restrict to probing only the Ken-
nedy and King killings.
'Im sorry'
WASHINGTON - Federal
Trade Commissioner Paul
Rand Dixon formally apologized
yesterday to Arab Americans
and "all who are concerned"
over his use of an ethnic slur
against Ralph Nader, but some
members of Congress called for
Dixon's removal from office.
Sixteen members of Congress
urged President Carter to fire
Dixon, saying his remarks cast
a cloud "over his independence
and discretion in the many pro-
ceedings before his agency in
which Mr. .Nader participates."
One of the lawmakers, Rep.
Edward I. Koch (D-N.Y.), told
the House he will file a resolu-
tion of impeachment against
Dixon, a member of the com-
mission since 1961, for "using
vile language in a public for-
um."
Koch said Dixon's slur demon-
strated he is unfit to hold of-
fice. "It is not adequate that
he simply apologized," the con-
gressman said.
"It may be acceptable to Ralph
Nader. But it cannot be accept-
able to this House."
Clamping down
QAN FRANCISCO - California
imposed emergency re-
strictions on the use df natural
gas yesterday - including a ban
on all luxury uses - to help re-
lieve the crisis in other parts
of the country.
Robert Batinovich, president
of the California Public Utili-
ties Commission, said the re-
strictions may place Califor-
nians "below the comfort lev-
el," but will not impose the
hardships being experienced in
the Midwest, East and South.
At the same time the gas re-
strictions were imposed, parch-
ed Marin County began a string-

ent water rationing program, or-
dering the county's 180,000 resi-
dents to cut their water con-
sumption by more than half -
to 46 gallons per person each
per day.
Rationing by the Marin Mu-'
nicipal Water District, aimed at
slowing the rapid drain on res-
ervoirs that are now only one-
fourth full, will be voluntary
for two months. After that, wa-
ter use will be strictly moni-
tored and the tap turned off
on chronic abusers.
Coffee klatsch
WASHINGTON - Two con-
gressional subcommittees an-
nounced yesterday they will
hold joint hearings on the
price of coffee.
The hearings will be held in
Washington Feb. 22 and 23 by
the House subcommittee on
commerce, consumer and mon-
etary affairs and the subcom-
mittee on domestic marketing,
consumer relations and nutri-
tion.
The panels are headed, re-
spectively, by Reps. Benjamin
Rosenthal and Fred Richmond,
New York Democrats.
"The entire flow of coffee,
from the tropics to the kitchen,
must be thoroughly examined,"
they said in a joint statement.
"We must examine whether
consumers are being victimiz-
ed by market manipulation."
State
Dial down
LANSING - Gov. William
Milliken asked Michigan resi-
dents yesterday to dial their
thermostats down to 65 de-
grees and businesses to consid-
er shortening their work hours
in efforts to avoid the fuel crisis
which has idled workers in oth-
er states.
In a special energy message
Impressionsl
DUTCH WAX BATIKS
FRENCH COUNTRY PRINTS
NAVAJO HAND SCREEN PRINTS
347 Maynard, Ann Arbor
995-1095

broadcast live from the Capitol,
Milliken said the state will
maintain a temperature of 65
degrees in all office buildings
and will take steps to reduce
lighting and ventilation as well.
Milliken said that although
Michigan. is in better shape
than other states, steps should
be taken to avoid a serious fuel
cruch.
"I am making these requests
for voluntary cooperation now
so that we may conserve today
the fuel we will need tomor-
row," the governor said.
Milliken said Michigan could
face "potential major prob-
lems" if the extreme cold
weather continues, if the state's
natural gas supplies are divert-
ed to other states or if Michi-
gan's fuel supply system is
seriously disrupted.
If mandatory curtailment of
fuel becomes necessary, Millik-
en said, schools, factories and
commercial businesses might
have to be closed.
Shield lair
LANSING - A proposed
"shield" law giving strict legal
force to a reporter's right to
protect news sources has been
introduced in the state Senate.
The legislation drew a mixed
initial reaction yesterday from
a current and a former mem-j
ber of the Michigan Press. As-
sociation, the state's largest

mation, ideas and opinions by
permitting journalists in Michi-
gan to protect the anonymity of
their sources."
The bill, provides that a re-
porter "shall not be required
to disclose a source of news
as long as the news came into,
the journalist's possession in the
course of the journalist's em-
ployment as a professional jour-
nalist."
Attempts to enact strong
shield laws in the past have fail-
ed in Michigan, and Corbin said
he has not yet sounded out his
colleagues to determine what
the chances are for having it
approved this year.

Millikens 'Cool off'
newsnaner organization.
nut ben. %jary Corbin (U-
Clio), sponsor of the bill, said
he feels strongly that such a
measure is necessary "to en-
courage the free flow of infor-

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Stennis: 'Whoa'

vor in Congress for new and
tighter ethics codes is an out-
growth of government scandals
of recent years.
But Stennis said, "I wouldn't
put too many prohibitions in ef-
fect. With two much policing,
the Senate will lose its appeal
for the best qualified, the
younger men, those with high
aspirations."
Stennis said the rules should
require disclosure of any finan-
cial involvement that could
lead to a conflict of interest, but
"should not go one iota fur-
ther" in revealing aspects of
private life that do not relate
to the office.
Leaders of both House and
Senate are pledged to adoption
of new and tougher codes of
ethics this year.
A proposed House code would
limit outside income to 15 per
cent of the legislative salary,
which now is $44,600 and may
go up to $57,500 if a government
pay increase is allowed to be-
come effective later this month.
The Ho'ise plan also w6duld re-
quire disclosure of outside in-
come and gifts, severely limit
public - speaking honorariums,
abolish unofficial office ac-
counts and apply other restric-
tions.
Kennedy. King;
revisited
WASHINGTON-Congressional
leaders worked out a plan yes-
terday to keep alive temporari-
ly a controversial committee
set up to investigate the kill-
ings of President John Kenne-
dv and civil rights leader Mar-
tin Luther King.
The House of Representatives
Riles Committee adopted a
compromise proposal giving the
Assassinations Committee until
March 31 to devise rules for its
inquiry and to come up with a
budget more acceptable than a
proposed annual 6.5 million dol-
lars.
The Assassination Committee
officially ceased to exist when
the 94th Congress wound up last
year. Some critics had wanted

40
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y 40
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DEADLINE: Feb.,11, 3:00 p.m. 40
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Sunday, February 6

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Wednesday, February 2, 1977 Global Awareness Series: Henry
DAY CALENDAR Bucher, "Hurch and Apartheid: His-
Psychiatry: Barnaby Barratt, "Psy- torical Perspective," Aud. A, Angell,
choanalytic Knowledge: Problems 4 p.m.
and Perspectives," CPH Aud., 9:30 Int'l. Ctr.: "Summer Jobs Abroad:
a.m. Focus on western Europe," 603 E.
WtUOM: Dr. William Lamers, psy- Madison, 7 p.m.
chiatrist, California Medical Cen- Music School: Japanese Music Con-
ter, SF, "Grief: Dealing with Loss cert, Rackham Aud., 8 p.m.
Before and After Death," 10 a.m. Musical Society: Danzas Venegue->
ISMRRD: William M. Cruickshank, la, Power Ctr., 8 p.m.
"Structure: Program and Teaching
Materials II," 130 S. First St., 3 p.m.
MHRI: M. H. Aprison, Institute of THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Psychiatric Research, Indiana U., Volume LXXXVII, No. 101
"The Functional Role of Glycine in wednesday, February 2, 1977
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the Use of Sample Survey Weights Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
in Regression Analysis," 3227 Angell Arbor.
Hall, 4 p.m.

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