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February 02, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-02

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Page Two
*A career in law-
itboul awschool.
What can you do with only a bachelor s degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
undergraduate education and a challenging, respon-
sible career. The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do
work traditionally done by lawyers.
Three months of intensive training can give you
the skills--the courses are taught by lawyers. You
choose one of the seven courses offered-choose
the city in which you want to work.
Since 1970, The Institute for Paralegal Training
has placed more than 1600 graduates in law firms,
banks, and corporations in over 75 cities.
If you are a senior of high academic standing and
are interested in a career as a Lawyer's Assistant.
we'd like to meet you.
Contact your placement office for an interview with
our representative.
We will visit your campus on
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17
The Institute for
Paralegal Training
235 South 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103
(215) 732-6600
Operated by Para-Legal, Inc.

THE MICHIGAN ,DAILY

Wednesday; February 2, 1977

"Thi
provid
said
phone
Spe
the T
vent f
area
tricity
a yea
He
plante
small
nessee
So far
be su
Plat
transp
terms
ties A
prote
tat. T
additi
Hiwas
of th
"We
ten y
ful,"]
see t
the Hi
per c
darter
the Li

2 from 'U' seek
to save fish
(Continued from Page 1) According to TVA's Sanger,
its project is one that will TVA will appeal the court's ver-
de important benefi's," he dict to the U.S. Supreme Court.
yesterday during a tele- It will also seek to convince
interview. Congress to exempt the Tellico
cifically, Sanger said that project from the federal Endan-
ellico Dam will help pre- gered Species Act so construc-
flooding in the Chattanooga tion on the dam can proceed.
and provide enough elec- But, "right now, the project
to heat 20,000 homes for is stopped," said Assistant Dean
r. Cohen. If built, the dam would
added that TVA had trans- "increase the generating capa-
ed snail darters into other city in the TVA system by one
rivers near the Little Ten- 1000th," he added.
e a year and a half ago. According to Plater, the dam
, the transplants "seem to is capable of destroying more
ccessful," he sid. than just the snail darter. He
ter, however, said the pointed out that there are
plants would not satisfy the "16,000 acres of prime agricul-
of the Endangered Spe- tural area that would be stuck
Act of 1973, which seeks to under the mud."
ct a species' natural habi- The dam would also wipe out
he TVA plans to transplant "fantastic" fishing areas, Plater
onal snail darters into the added. and would flood Indian
ssee River, which is south burial mounds and a colonial
Little Tennessee. fort.
e won't know for five or According to Plater, TVA has
ears if it will be success- spent over $70 million buying
Plater said of the Hiwas- land and building roads for the
ransplant. He added that dam - at the same'time know-
iwassee contains only two ing that the project was in vio-
ent of the suitable snail lation of the Endangered Species
r spawning beds found in Act.
ittle Tennessee. ;Plater claims the first TVA
action on the project was to
bulldoze a stand of sycamores
at the site of the first treaty be-
tween the Indians and American
colonists west of the Appala-
chian Mountains. The Coytee
day Springs historical site is now
"just a muddy hole," he said.
lAIR Tr
the numbers of
ge billboards iny
o hospitals, rice

Sides of Vietna m To
and
Songs by the cast of H
When HAIR was running on Broadway in the late 60's,
Americans and Vietnamese killed were written on larc
the lobby. The Vietnam war is over but the damage tc
fields, and entire villages remains.
CANTERBURY HOUSE is sponsoring HAIR in Lydia M
atgr, February,17 through 20, as a benefit for Friendsl
to people aid for the reconstruction of Vietnam. One d
ticket will go for materials to help Vietnam rebuild itse
ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3 AT NOON, Barbara Fu
a program of slides from her recent trip to Vietnam ir
Arts Information Center on the second floor of the N
The cast of HAIR will perform a number of songs f
Admission is free.
Thursday, February 3-12 n
Pendleton Room
SECOND FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION

AP Ptoto
JOAN MONDALE RUSHES to embrace her husband, the VicePresident, yesterday at nearby Andrews Air Force Base after he
returned from a 10-day 22,000-mile fact-finding mission to Western Europe and Japan.

RELAYS GOOD NEWS TO CARTER:
Mondale returns

from trip,

endelssohn The-
hipment, people
ollar from eachs
:If.
iller will present
n the Pendleton
ichigan Union.
from the show.
oon

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The GUADALAJARA SUM-
McR C H O O L, a° fully
accredited UNIVLRSITY OF
A RIZ O NA program, will
offer July 1-August 12, an-
thropology, art, economics,
bilingual education, folklore,
history, political s c i e n c e,
Spanish language and litera-
ture. Tuition and fees, $220;
boardand room with Mexi-
can family, $280. Write to
GUADALAJARA SUMMER
SCHOOL, 1530 Gamma
Apartments, University of
Arizona, T u c s a n, Arizona
85721.

WASHINGTON (AP) - Vice
President Walter Mondale, his
globe - hopping introduction to
diplomacy complete, returned to
Washington yesterday and said
"all of our relationships with
our friends are on the firmest,
most optimistic basis.",
President Carter greeted Mon-
dale upon his return from the
10-day, 22,000-mile, fact-finding
trip to Western Europe and Ja-
pan. Mondale met with leaders
in Brussels, Bonn, Rome, Lon-
don, Paris and Tokyo; as well
as holding an audience with
Pope Paul VI during his jour-
ney.
"WE WERE received warm-
ly," Mondale told Carter,
"There is a spirit of optimism
among our friends inspired by
your leadership."
Carter, who will receive a re-
port from Mondale Wednesday

morning at the White House,
said his vice president "en-
gaged in the kinds of discus-
sions in the same depth I would
have if I'd gone on the trip
myself.
"He's done an absolutely su-
perb job. He has made me'and
the nation proud," the President
said. "My only order to him is
to go home and get some rest."
Mondale has scheduled a news
conference Wednesday to report
on his trip.
AS THEY RODE Carter'sl
helicopter to the White House,
the President brought Mondale
up to date on the issue of U.S.
support for Soviet dissident An-
drei Sakhrov.
Carter said he told Soviet Am-
bassador Anatoly Dbbrynin ear-
lier Tuesday that "we're not go-
ing to back down" on public
support for Sakharov.

A Soviet prosecutor warned state of economic relations"
Sakharov last week that he faces with Japan and the Common
possible criminal charges if he Market countries, the Soviet
continues his dissident activi- news agency said.
ties. "DURING HIS TOUR Walter
THE STATE DEPARTMENT Mondale met with growing pro-
cautioned Moscow last Thursday tests against U.S. protection-
against attempting to "intimi- ism," Tass said, "the knot of
date" or otherwise silence Sak- economic contradictions be-
harov. Dobrynin, in turn, com- tween the United States, the
plained that the statement was Commn Market and Japan
bound to be resented in Mos- continues to tighten."
cow. In an interview during the
Mondale's "lightning visit" to flight home, :Mondale told re-
Europe and Japan points up porters aboard Air Force Two
serious economic difficulties in that his mission "opened up
the Western world, the Soviet close consultations -and person-
news agency Tass said Tues- alrelations between a new gov-
day. ernment in the United States
The trip is "a manifestation and our traditional allies and
of serious concern by the new friends in Western Europe and
U.S. administration over the Japan."
Senate stalls action
as gas pains rage

0

By the time
we're old enough to
have children, we've
been thoroughly sold
on the idea.
By our parents,
our grandparents,.
our friends and
neighbors, the media,
eveIyone.
It's hard to
remember we ever
had a choice in the
first place.
But there is a
choice. Having a
child is a tremendous
responsibility and
an important decision.
Probably the most
important decision
we'll ever make.
And once it's
made, it can never
be undone.
Just remember . .
you do have a choice.
So think about it,
and do what's right
for you.
For more information write:
National
Organization
for
Non-Parents
306 Relsterstown Road
Baltimore. Maryland 21208
!'d like to know more about N OM.
Please send me your free
"Am i Parent.-Materiar package.
name

The University of Michigan
Family Housing Apartments
For a LIMITED TIME ONLY, the Housing Divi-
sion will accept transfer requests for two bed-
room furnished apartments in Northwoods 11
and III from present tenants who previously
have been only eligible for residency in one
bedroom apartments.
New applicants are also encouraged to apply.
Priority wilil be givento present tenants who
wish to transfer.

(Continued from Page 1)
power to declare a state of em-
ergency for an energy short-e
age, meaning he could order
cutbacks in heating homes and'
shorter hours for schools and1
businesses, among other things..
IN MANY CASES, cutbacks
in industry and business have1
been enforced by gas cbmpan-t
ies, not government, simply
through the cutting of supplies.-
Pleas by governors and mayors
also resulted in businesses cut-
ting hours or closing and low-
er thermostat settings.

to 65 d-green d'iring the day,
and the star s attorney gen-
eral said violation could lead
to up to a year in, prison.
- In Philadelphia, Mayor
Frank Rizzo last week ordered
closing of nonessential business-
es that depend on gas for heat
inorder to. ensure homes would
be kept warm. He allowed some
to reopen on Monday, saying
weekend conservation efforts
had worked.
- The. governor's evecutive
council in Minnesota ordered
65-degree daytime temperatures
and 60-degree night ones for all
fuel users.
- In Georgia, one of the few
businesses under directo gov-
ernment control - because it
is. licensed - was ordered to
cut back hours. The state rev-
enue department issued the or-
der. to beer, wine and liquor
stores,
- Maryland Gov. Marvin
iandel signed an executive or-
der banning lighting for decora-
tion or advertising.

There have been some cases,
For more information on vacancies, visit the where government orders have
Ifhit the private sector, however.
Housing Information Office, 1011 Student Among them were:e
Activities Building or colI 763-3166. -Gov. Brendan Byrne of New,
- ~Jersey has ordered 'homes and
I businesses to lower thermostatse
Ii
GLOBAL AWARENESS
SERIES
WEEKLY: Wed. 4 p.m. Thurs. NOON
LECTURE LUNCH/DISCUSSION
Angell Hall Aud. "A" Lord of Light Luth. (Hill & Forest)
Feb. 2-4 p.m. Prof. Henry Bucher-CHURCH AND APARTHEID:
HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES THE MISSIONARY
Feb. 3--noon CHURCH IN-AFRICA. Prof. Bucher has a PhD in
African Studies from U. of Wisc. and is currently
working in their African Studies Program. He has
lived in Africa.
PARAGUAY
Feb. 9-4 p.m. The Rev. Frisco Gilchrist-THE U.S. AND HUMAN
RIGHTS IN LATIN AMERICA. He served in Para-
Feb. 10-noon quay since 1952 at Colegia International, the
Disciples of Christ education program, and most
recently with Friendship Mission working with
peasant/Indian communities. The current inter-s
vention of the government resulted in his arrest
and expulsion.

The orders directly
government have been,
quent.

affecting
more fre-

"

i HAD
CANCER
AND
I IVED,

t..fr i.... {. - . S ....

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