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January 25, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-25

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Tuesday, January 25, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PQgC Three

F7EA takes action to
increase gas supplies

n WASHINGTON (AP) -The
e Federal Energy Administration
(FEA) took emergency action
yesterday to increase supplies
of natural gas and fuel oil in
;;~i.;..a move to counteract layoffs of
thousands of workers around the
~ nation because of the energy
shortage-
Acting FEA administrator Gor-
: man Smith told a news confer-
eethat tlates srvey indi-
were laid off during some part
of last week because of natural
~ *...~......gas shortages - 100,000 more
than had been estimated Friday
4 & by the White House. .
The FE~A action will steer
S~ ~~j~j.: .: ~more propane into natural gas
.':.......'. ~ .~. '.~srom jt fuel into fuelkeopro-e
S c .**. ~duction.
\. ..~. SMITHI SAID natural-gas short.-
*****..:. ~.*ages were most severe in the
-'southeastern states and Ohio,
'while the need for kerosene fuel
oil was most acute in the north-
.-emn portions of Michigan, Wis-
consin, North Dakota and Mn-
* ..~. ....ne..-rident Carter, meanwhile,
,.. 6 rescinded his predecessor's or-
.... .. .,..,der that price and allocation
~. -k: 2controls on gasoline be dropped.
s President Ford's move would
have taken effect in March in
S..-. . an attempt to increase supplies
Sof gasoline. There was dis agree-
S... ~ment over how control would
-~ . /1.effect the price of gasoline.
~.SMITH SAID there is enough
.'-.... ~natural gas and petroleum avail-
-. ....~~ ~able to continue to serve resi-
AP Poto dences, essential public services
AP Photoand other high-priority users if
A hit the ooksit is properly distributed, which
is the aim of the emergency
First lady Rosalynn Carter takes daughter, Amy, by the hand as they arrive at Stevens ele- rules.
mentary school, five blocks from thie White House. Yesterday was the first day of school in FEA rules assign top priority
Washington for the little fourth grader from P labns, for natural gas supplies to em-
YOUNG PENSIONERS RECEIVE FULL PA Y:
Military retirees find govt. jobs

ergency services, energy pro- er than four years ago, before
duction, sanitation, telecommu- the Arab oil embargo.

nications, passenger transporta-
tion, medical and nursing build-
ings, aviation ground support
systems, and certain testing in
electrical utility plants.
Residential gas use and plants I
requiring some natural gas to
prevent serious damage had
been assigned 95 per cent of the
gas they u1sed during the winter
THE FEA'S emergency rule
issued M onday added residentia
top priority, assigning them all
the gas they now need.
Smith said the old allocation
was based on a relatively mild
winter and was not adequate
for this winter's severe weath-
er.
The new rule also allows al-
-location of extra propane, to
supplement natural gas, to gas
utilities that have cut off ser-
vice to industries and are in
top priority users.of evc o
THE OTHER RULE issued by
the FEA authorizes the agency
to order selected refineries to
divert some of their production
from kerosene-based jet fuel to
kerosene-based :No. 1 heating
ol.-
Smith said five refineries
would be selected in the north.-
ern states for such conversion
orders, increasing kerosene sup-
plies regionally by some 10,000
barrels a day, or some seven
to eight per cent.
Smith said the shift should
have little impact op commer-
cial airlines, whose planes burn
kerosene jet fuel, although there
might be some changes in flight
schedules.
HE SAID THERE is adequate
kerosene in other parts of the
road tank cars, and because of
ice on. the upper Mississippi
and Ohio Rivers and the Great
Lakes.
Airliners, on the other hand,
can refuel outside the kerosene-
shortage area, Smith pointed
out.
Kerosene is burned directly
by some users in the northern
states, Smith said, and is blend-
ed with heavier fuel oils to keep
them flowing during cold weath-
er.
MEANWHILE, THE FEA re-
ported that domestic demand
for all petroleum products in
the four weeks which ended
Jan. 7 was more than 12 per
cent higher than a year earlier
and nearly eight per cent high-

The increase was attributed1
largely to high demand for light
and heavy fuel oil, both up more-
than 22 per cent from a year
ago.
U.S. petroleum demand had1
dipped below previous levels in
the wke of the 1973-1974 Arab'
cut-off of oil imports, but the
FEA reported that 1976 con-
sumption was just about back
to the pre-embargo level.
MEANWHILE, however, U.S.
natural gas production has con-
tinued to decline creating short-
ages that demand careful dis-
tribution of the available supply
and maximum use of other
Smith said some natural gas
distribution companies, having
already shut 'off gas to nones-
sential industrial customers,
were uncomfortably close to be-
ing forced to curtail the top-pri-
ority users.
aily Officia ulen
TDaily Official Bulletina
officia p ublicatio of the Unver-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferon beforle 2 pm. of
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
sunday. Items appear once only.
student organization notices are
oreacinformatio, phone 764-9270.
Tuesday, January 25, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Tom Hayden, former pres.
s.D.S. speaks about the past, pres-
ent, and future, 10:05 a.m-.
Physics/Astronomy: S. McCarthy,
Ford Scientific Lab., "Light Emis-
sion . From Metal-Insulator-Metal
pianist, Rackham Aud. 8:30 p m.

PIRGIM thanks those who hove supported its
public interest work.
For those who wish not to fund, PIRGIM announces a
Pirg im Fee Cancellation

1.
2.

Your tuition bill shows the $1.50 PIRGIM fee.
To cancel the fee assessment
a. simply fill out any piece of paper or the form
enclosed with your tuition bill
b. with your name, i.d. number, signature,
c. and SEND or take the cord ..
(you may enclosed it with your tuition
payment)
d. to the Student Accounts Office (2nd floor SAB)
e. ANY time this term.

metl Pconue and housing activtes with a $1.5 fee)
STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOK ING IS OUR SPECIALTY

Breakfast. All Day
3 Eqos, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1 35
Horn or Bacon or Sausaqe
wath 3 Eaqs, Hash Browns,
Toast & .lly-$1 95
Hash Browne,EToa~ste &
Jelly-$2.25
We make Three Eqq Omlets
-Western Omlet
-Bean Sprout Omlet

EVERYDAY SPECIALS
Bee Stronoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Eaq Rolls
Home-made Soups, Beef,
Barley, Clam Chowder, etc.
Home-made Chili
Veqetable Tempuro
(served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburuer Stek Dinner-
Beef Curry Rice
Baked Flounder Dinner
Delicious Korean Bar-b-u Beef
Fried Fesh Bean Sp ro
Kim-Chee

J

Monday-Friday 8-8
Saturday 9-8
Sunday 10-8

ss.s

WASHINGTON (VP) - More I
than 141,000 retired military I
men and women, given the op-
portunity for a second career
by their pension system. have,
taken a new job with their old
employer - the U. S. govern-
ment-.
Under the military's pension
system, these retirees - about
half in their late 30s and early
40s - can legally receive both
full pension checks and full pay
for their -civilian federal jobs.
The first comprehensive
study of military pensioners in
civilian federal jobs was con-
ducted by the U. S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission. A copy of the
study was obtained by The As-
sociated Press.
B EC AU SE MILITARY
personnel can retire with a
pension after 20 years of serv-
ice regardless of age, they can
start new careers and start
earning new pensions.
This differs from most private
employes towait unti a r-
tain age - such as 62 -- be-
fore receiving a pension that is
generally smaller than the mili-
The cost to taxpayers of pen-
sions and salary for the 141,000
military retirees in civilian fed-
eral jobs is $2.8 billion a year.
THE PENSIONS A L ONE
amount to $870 million a year
- but that -is only a part of the
increasing cost of the over-all
military pension system.-
On an individual basis, the
commission study calculated
retired officers with federal
civilian jobs received nay and
pension averaging $3,97 a
Frretired noncommissioned
officers. pay and pension aver-
aged $22,156. For other retired
enlisted men, the average was
MORE THAN HALF of the
i1 fderal job were under age
About 8,000 were under 40:
32,379 between 40 and 45; and
32,760 between 46 and SO.
Only 9,246 were over 60 years
Te military pensioner gets
from 50 to 75 ner cent of salary
as pension. Many private ien-
sions provide less than half of
the final salary as a pension.
A MILITARY iension is not
reduced -when the retiree takes
another job. But Social Secur-
ity, a critical part of many pri-
vate retirees' income, is cut
when a priva-te pensioner takes
a job earning $3,000 or more a
year.
The military nension system
has vigorous defenders.
"If a imilitarv retiree is the

every opportunity to hold a ci- end of the scale, 26,143 of the
vilian job - just like everyone pensioners were making less
else," says Maurice Lien of The than $10,000 in their civilian
Retired Officers Association. jobs.
"Militry- retirement pay is THE MILITARY RETIREE
separately earned." is also treated differently from
THE ANNUAL COST of '311 a retiring federal civil servant.
military pensions has grown The civilian retiree cannot
almost 10-fold since 1962 to $8.2 retir from hi job, dt'eraw this
billion while the entire defense pensi o andte take anothesr
budge has ot qut thdabned former civilian employe must
That $8.2 billion is more thn ie up either the pension or
the Army pays to its morv e salary if he gets another I
duty soldiers each year, moefederal job.
than the Air Force spends an- *
nually to buy missiles and M I L I T A R Y pensioners
planes and more than the Navy can also qualify for a civil
spends a year to build ships. service pension by working in
The civil service study count- a federal civilian job. A retired
ed 141,817 military pensioners civil servant, however, cannot
in civilian federal jobs on June qualify for a second pension if
30, 1975 - about 13 per cent of he returns to federal govern-
the total of 1,096,184 persons ment . service.
listed by the Pentagon as draw- Here's a hypothetical exam-
ing military pensions. That pie of getting pension and pay:
meant pensioners made un A 45-year-old lieutenant col-
about 5 per cent of the 2.8 mil- onel in the Army is passed over
lion federal employes on that for promotion and must retire.
date.
MORE THAN HALF of these1
retirees work in civilian jobs in
their oldagencythe DefenseNwtrv
Pensioners holding civilian a d e
federal jobs were scattered an ge ~
across the country, with the
most in California, Virginia, (satffm be
trd d i er -icluding 177 Youire Interested in travel,
retired generals and admirals want to visit exotic foreign
- are working in the federal ports, meet new people and
government in the Washington, famous personalities and
D. C., area. have adventures you'll re-
Of the total, 2,940 were earn- member for a lifetime. But,
ing more than $29,000 a year for you don't have the money?
their civilian jobs. At the other Well, now Is your chance!
____________________ And yuwill be pad-as a
THE MICHIGAN DAILY staff memtber of a luxury
Volume LXXXVIt, No. 94 Cussi.
Tuesday, January 25, 1977 cnles. .. as n-

His annual salary after 25 years
service is $23,781.
AS SOON AS HE retires, he
starts getting pension checks
each month of $1,282 - about
$15,380 a year.
He applies for, and after a
waitingaperiod, s erappointed t
old agencs a te Pentago a
a GS-12.
So his salary and pension add
up to $35,820.
UNDER A 196S LAW that at-
tempts to limit the compensa-
tion of military retirees in civi-
hian federal jobs, a regular of.-
ficer's pension is cut by half the
amount above $3,900 when he
takes a civilian federal job.
However, retired officers who
came from the reserves or the
national guard and retired en-
listed men can receive a full
pension and a full salary.

AT
BE AUT IFU L
UNION
LANES
open 11I a.m. today

ART, PRINT, POSTER, CALENDAR & BOOK SALE
* ALL prints & posters 25% off
'A Large selection of prints 50% off
* All f ramed items 25% to 50% of
* All 1977 calendars 25% off list
'~Selected Art, Craft, Architecture books 35% off
* Selected remainders marked down to absurd prices
SALE RUNS THROUGH JANUARY 31
) (Note: Does not include custom framing which is
already the best & least expensive in town)
~I~tbE-

I, have fun
said for it!
peuienced CruIse Directors
Is the first of its kind ever
published, and provides an
up-to-date directory of who
to contact. It tels In detail
how to get a good-payIng
position with loads of fringe
benefits in the glamorous
cruIse ship fleet. (Either for
an exciting Career, or for
summers or holdays.)
Britsh Umlted, 220 71st Street.
SuIte 207, MiamI Beach, F. 33141

R ESIDENCY
QUEST IONS*
Come to Campus Legal Aid's
Question and Answer Ses-
sion for students interested
in applying for, or appealing
residency.
ROOM 4202
MICHIGAN UNION

at the Universityao ichgan News
paid aAnArbor, Michgan 48109.
P~ublished d a iil y Tuesday through
siyearmat 42 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mall outside Ann
Summr sesion publshed Tues-
Arbor; $7.50 by mai outside Ann
Arbor.

D o dea Sn or ou op tody ead check o mo oe (no Ui
CD~lae o 275 (2.20 pIs 5c handling) o Britis Umld ,220
71st Street, Suite 207, Miami Beach, flodida 33141 (Florlda residents add
* 4% sales tax. Allow 4 wks. for deltveiy)
U ~1ame---- ~ ~-----
L mm m m= m m m m me m m mm m'.

TUES., JAN. 25
at 7:00 P.M.

DANCING TO LIVE BANDS

AT THE
NO COVER
CASUAL DR ESSu
-ALS-1

TONIGHT

NIGH TS
A WEEK
LADIES NIGHT
TUESDAY &r THURSDAY
High
aop

Michael Ponti, PIANIST
Rackham Auditorium, 8:30

JAZZ
IN OUR 1st FLOOR
PUB

BEETHOVEN: "Eroica" Variations; CHOPIN: Sonata in B-flat minor
SCRIABIN: Three Preludes, Op. 35, Satanic Poem, op. 36
RACHMANINOFF: Sonata in B-flat minor, op. 36
Tickets at $3.50, $5, $6.50

FRl. AND SAT. EVES.

ausom ame

-w

seu

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