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December 06, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

/.

Supreme Court says police can-

make drivers lea

WASHINGTON (AP) - Motorists
stopped for routine traffic violations
may be ordered by police to get out of
their cars, the Supreme Court ruled
yesterday. Three dissenting justices
said the decision 'leaves police
discretion utterly without limits."
In deciding a Philadelphia case,
the high court's six-member major-
ity ruled that such orders are
justified by concerns for police safety
- concerns it called "legitimate and
weighty."
"ESTABLISHING A face-to-face
confrontation diminishes the possi-
bility, otherwise substantial, that the
driver can make unobserved move-
ments," the court said in an unsigned
opinion. "This, in turn, reduces the
likelihood that the officer will be the
victim of an assault."
Justice John Paul Stevens, in a
strongly worded dissent in which
Justices Thurgood Marshall and
William Brennan; joined, said such
police actions threaten the constitu-
tional rights of motorists to be
protected a g a i n s t unreasonable
searches.

"To eliminate any . requirement
that an officer be able to explain the
reasons for his actions signals an
abandonment of effective judicial
supervision . . . and leaves police
discretion utterly without limits,"
Stevens said.
IN OTHER matters yesterday, the
court:
" Agreed to settle a dispute over
water rights between the federal gov-
ernment and California, a controver-
sy with significant impact for 16
other western states. At issue is
whether states legally may impose
water-use conditions on federal
water-management projects.
Refused to review an attempt by
x the Hunt family of Texas to collect at
least $375 million from the world's
seven largest oil producers for the
1973 nationalization of Hunt oil
holdings in Libya.
* Agreed to decide whether the
estate of the late Clay Shaw may sue
former New Orleans District Attor-
ney Jim Garrison for allegedly vio-
lating Shaw's civil rights by prose-

ve their
cuting him on charges that he
conspired to assassinate President
John F. Kennedy.
" Let stand a lower court's ruling
that makes it easier for individuals to
sue government agencies for alleged

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, December 6, 1977-Page 5
EL JAYS GIFTS
Going Out of Business Sale!
50o OFF ALL GIFT ITEMS!
Everything goes, even the fixtures, showcases, jewelry cases,
gla~s shelving, and brackets.
Gift shop located at Ann Arbor Inn, corner of South 4th
and Huron
7.30 a. m. -10p.m. Weekdays and Sat., 9-S Sun.
CALL 663-7155

cars,
civil rights violations in employment.
The court's action was a defeat for
the Tennessee Valley Authority,
which is being sued for alleged racial
bias at its Muscle Shoals, Ala., opera-
tions.

a
.s

12 Hour

I0

l

SACUA discusses

counseln
By CAROLYN MORGAN
Student counseling services were
under fire in July 1976 when an
extensive survey revealed many stu-
dents were unaware of existing
services. As. a result, efforts to
improve counseling are overshiadow-
ing recommendations for construc-
tion of student housing.
Both these questions - as well as
inquiries into the allocation of funds
from the University Development
Office's Annual Giving Fund, - were
discussed at yesterday's meeting of
the Senate Advisory. Committee on
University Affairs (SACUA).
JANICE LINDBERG, SACUA liai-
son with the Student Relations Com-
mittee, reported that two of the items
generated for the committee's agen-
da next year were additional counsel-
ing services and student housing.
"They seemed to be backing off the
housing area and putting more effort
into counseling," she said.'
James Robertson, chairman of the
Student Relations Committee, said'
his organization became interested
in counseling improvements as a
result-of an extensive survey issued
to undergraduates and graduates
concerning the quality of student
counseling services.
ALTHOUGH THE Student Rela-

g, housing
tions Committee is concentrating on
counseling, it hasn't abandoned the
housing question. "We simply need to
know more about housing and what
shifts are planned," Robertson said.
"We. are' trying to be sufficiently
knowledgeable so as to be advisable
(to Vice-President Henry Johnson)."
After SACUA was asked to nomin-
ate a faculty member to serve on the
Annual Giving Committee, the mem-
bers agreed to hear the Annual
Giving Program manager.
"What's worrisome to us," SACUA
Chairman Charles Lehmann said, "is
how the money is spent. We'd like to
make sure that it is not spent in
frivolous or non-academic areas."
DAVID PARKES, manager of the
Annual Giving Program, said yester-
day in a telephone interview that
"most of the contributions go for en-
richment in the schools and to fund
new programs which would not be
fundable, through state appropria-
tion."
Distribution of funds, if not desig-
nated by the particular school, is
made by an executive officer, a chief
budget officer or a financial officer.
Solicitation is made through the
individual schools, Parkes said.
"There is no pressure on the faculty
to give," he added.,

'4
4
A

.,.,..a......

Language may hurt
foreign defendants
Continued from Page 1) f

There's no

U

to lose.

F Fn.

"THEY (THE DEFENSE attorneys),
didn't think that this was something
that could be used in terms of an ap-
peal," Naylor says. ."If this problem
had been brought up during the trial it
may have been some help. Any grounds
for an appeal has to come from the
trial."
Naylor insists, however, that her
study is not an attempt to help overturn
Narciso and Perez's controversial con-
viction.
"We are doing this research on
general principle," she said.e"This is
not specifically intended to help them

(the VA nurses). This is an attempt to
study the problem of the non-native
speaker of English in matters of law."
Naylor says that the VA case is only
one example, albeit a classic one, of
how testifying in a none-native tongue
has the potential for being detrimental
to criminal defendants. She hopes to ex-
pand her study to "cases involving
other minorities."
Naylor presented a preliminary
report of her study in a brown-bag lec-
ture last Friday at Lane Hall. She
hopes to receive a grant soon so that she
may continue her work.

Sale Wednesday Only. 9:30a.m. to 9. p.m.
THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "12 HOUR SALE" BARGAINS

.I

Fridlay December 9, 1977
Michigan Union Ballroom
Big Band, Entertainers.
Cash Bar, Dancing.

Dinner Optijonal
University Club 7-8:30PM
Show $4 single, $7couple
Ballroom 9 PM

Tickets available in
Michigan Union Lobby
Sponsored by WCBN
UAC, Michigan Union
Progamming Committee

t .'
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3 3

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PIONEER SX-550 AM/FM
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Cassette deck has electronically
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Brushless servo-controlled DC
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PIONEER RT-1011L 10"
REEL-TO-REEL DECK
3-motor drive system. 3 heads.
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equalizer selectors. Cabinet.
p366

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