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December 04, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-12-04

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 4, 1977-Page 3
Barrier-free law may postpone
opening of battered wife shelter

No Waiting
4 HAIRCUTTERS
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
Liberty off State
E. Univ. at So. Univ.

I tJU SEE NEW1'S IAPEn CALL:DfLY
Just send it back
Ah, the modern world. Things didn't used to be so complicated. Listen
to this one: the federal government is investigating the possibility that
marijuana laced with a highly toxic insecticide is being smuggled into the
country from Mexico. Of course, you'll never guess who helped finance
the insecticide program - right, the United States. Possessing mari-
juana, you'll recall, is illegal in the U.S., and the government helped pay
for the insect spray to kill the plants so they couldn't be smuggled across
the border. But now, says White House aide Lee Dogoloff, the Carter ad-
ministration is worried that the tainted grass may be a health hazard to
American dope smokers. If we were the Carter people we'd be worried
too, but almost as much by how silly we looked as for those toking on the
stuff.
Sincerely yours
It would probably surprise the
author more than anyone else. Just
discovered at the National Archives ;r
and Records Service is a letter writ- 8
ten in 1940 to President Franklin4
Roosevelt from one Fidel Castro,p
aged 12. The little guy offered FDR a
deal: he said he would show him a
rich iron 'mine in Cuba for a ten-g
dollar bill. Actually, it wasn't quite_
clear whether Fidel was offering the
information in exchange for the
money, or just wanted to pass along
the info and thought he would ask for
the money anyway. Here's what he
wrote, in part, "I am 12 years old. I
am a boy but I think very much but I FDR 's budd
do not think that I am writing to the
President of the United States. If you
like, give me a ten dollars bill
green american, in the letter, because never, I have not seen a ten dollars
bill green american and I would like to have one of them ... If you want
iron to make your ships I will show to you the biggest mines of iron of the
land. They are in Mayari, Oriente, Cuba." Officials are pretty sure
"Fidel" is THE Fidel. One thing's for certain: if he remembers the iron,
he ain't sending it to the U.S. for ships.
Happenings...
The holiday Happenings slump is starting to take hold, no doubt, but
there are a few thigs to keep you busy today ... the Winter Art Fair will
be held from 10 this morning until 5 this afternoon ... German film direc-
tor Werner Herzog will be at a special documentary showing at 2 p.m. in
Auditorium A of Angell Hall ... "The Gods of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman
Period" is the topic of continuing free gallery talks at 2 p.m. at the Kelsey
Museum of Archaeology ... the Open Singles group sponsors a seminar at
8 p.m. at the First United Methodist church on "Equality of the Sexes:
Men, Women and the Constitution," which will examine in particular the
Equal Right Amendment ... Chabad House, 715 Hill, holds a wine and
cheese party at 8 p.m. celebrating Chanuka ... On monday, the Friends
of the Ann Arbor Public Library continue their book sale from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Hardbacks will be a buck and paperbacks 50, but remember: if you
wait until Tuesday, hardbacks will be only a quarter and paperbacks two
for a quarter ... best of all, the Ann Arbor Cactus and Succulent Society
holds its December meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the University's Botannical
Gardens. Tom Friedlander will show his slides of stapeliads. You're
welcome to bring along all those stapeliads you've been stuffing up in the
attic.
Another great idea
Some government-trained dolphins capable of killing enemy swim-
mers and delivering explosives were sold to Latin American countries by
researchers connected with the CIA. We were wondering why they hadn't
thought of that one yet. A navy scientist revealed the operation in testi-
mony during his trial for releasing two of the dolphins from University
of Hawaii research tanks in May. The trial is seen as a test of "animal
rights." The dolphins were to be trained to attack Soviet nuclear cruise
ships in Havana Harbor, and were also trained for something called
"swimmer nullification." We think that means "killing." The whole,
thing, scientist Michael Greenwood said, "is unconscionable and in-
dicates a sort of syndrome in the scientific branch of the Pentagon which
says you can justify anything." Quite.
"
On the outside
Look out - one to two inches of wet snow is headed in our direction,
likely to drop on us this afternoon. The high will be about 35, the low
about 23*.

wi r

By RICHARD VANDER VEEN
The opening of a shelter for battered
spouses and children in Washtenaw
County, the first of its kind in Michigan,
will probably be delayed because it
fails to comply with the state's Barrier-
Free Law (BFL).
Because the Shelter Available for
Emergencies, (SAFE) House, has been
unable to secure a barrier-free lease for
the state-owned house it plans to rent,
the facility may have to postpone its
January 2 opening.
"THE SLOWNESS of the appeal pro-
cess makes it look like it might be
February 1" before the center opens,
said Jane Hakken of the Ann Arbor
Domestic Violence Center (DVC),
which sponsors SAFE-house.
The BFL states that state property
open to the public, as SAFE House will
be, must provide entry ramps, curb
cuts, barrier-free parking, adequately
wide doorways and elevators, as neces-
sary for handicapped persons.
The opening of the facility could take
even longer, according to Ashley Jones
of the state Bureau Facilities Section
which leases the property. "Getting ex-
emptions (to the BFL) is easier said
than done." It has to be carefully docu-
mented.,"
HAKKEN AGREED that the handi-
capped feel strongly about the BFL. "A
handicapped woman on our (the SAFE)
planning commission doesn't feel an ex-
ception should be made, even in this
case," she said.
SAFE house, would provide refuge
and live-in counseling for the victims of
domestic violence.
Battered wives and their children
could stay as long as a month but would
be required to stay three days, as "a
cooling off and clearing up period,"

Hakken explained.
During that time, the victim would
"be involved in peer counseling at the
shelter and in working with legal aid or
the Department of Social Services out-
side of the shelter," she said.
"THERE WOULD be no attempt to
alter the woman's thinking about her
marriage or husband. But every effort
would be made to make clear to her the
available options. It would be a time for
her to make decisions," she empha-
sized.
A study prepared by the Assault
Crisis Center in Ypsilanti shows that
there had been 423 cases of domestic
violence in Washtenaw County over a
ten-month period, Hakken said. A more
comprehensive study by the center is
expected soon.
Ironically, news of SAFE house's
postponement comes after a healthy
two-month fund-raising drive; $15,542
of a needed $20,000 in personal con-
tributions toward the January opening
had already been raised.
SAFE house's projected annual
budget is $83,000.
AT A PRESS CONFERENCE at
SAFE house Nov. 14, Governor William
Milliken praised it as the first facility in
the state to provide refuge and live-in
counseling. He also said he was
"strongly supportive" of a package of
state bills which would prevent spouse
abuse.
One of the bills, introduced last mon-
th by Rep. Connie Binsfield (R-Maple

City), would authorize the Department
of Social Service to contact with private
agencies for housing and support ser-
vices for abused spouses.
Presently, the Ypsilanti Assault
Crisis Center provides housing to
abused spouses at motels on an emer-
gency basis.
Since 1975 the Ann Arbor DVP has
sponsored a program where volunteers
took battered women into their homes
for a three-day period. This, however,
proved insufficient to meet the area's
growing demand.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No.72
Sunday, December 4, 1977
is edited and maniaged by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University-year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

LING LEE Year End Sole
20% OFF on
$10 or more purchase
407 N. Fifth Ave.
(inside Kerrytown)

1

CANTERBURY HOUSE presents
JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE AND WELL
AND LIVING IN PARIS
A NEW KIND OF MUSICAL PLAY
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, DEC. 9 and 10
at 8 p.m. in the PENDLETON ROOM
on the second floor of the Michigan Union
All tickets $2 at the Michigan Union lobby
ticket office or at the door

I

Friday, Dec. 9, 1977
Michigan Union Ballroom
Big Band Entertainers
Cash Bar, Dancing

Dinner optional
University Club
7-8:30 PM
Show $4.00 Single
$7.00 Couple
Ballroom 9 PM

Tickets available in Michigan Union Lobby
Sponsored by WCBN
UAC, Michigan Union Programming Committee
FRANCOIS TRUFFA UT'S 1970
MISSISSIPPI ME RMA ID-
CATHERINE DENEUVE and JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO star in this unusual
Truffaut film. Beneath ihe surface of a preposterous romantic melodrama
lurks Truffaut's thoughtful exploration of love and loneliness. "d likewit
very much," says Vincent Canby, New York Times. In Frendh (with
subtitles) and in color.
TUES: FIRES ON THE PLAIN (FREE AT 8)
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA GU ILD 7&9:0 $1.50

THE NATIONAL TOUR OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST MUSICAL

I

p IOM MALLOW
1, ' All;.

rvi

3
' ACK
...

-Nl

(/

EDWARD
MULHARE

ANNE
ROGERS

YES
5-Count em

I\Jl INE~

..... iror le
University
Cellar

December Grads ..........
In order to establish a STUDENT BOOKSTORE, the U ef M Students voted
overwhelmingly in 1969 to assess each student $5.00 This assess-
ment was collected as part of the ENROLLMENT DEPOSIT and is
REFUNDED UPON GRADUATION.
We have a list of all students who were assessed this amount.
SO... if youare graduating this DECEMBER 18th, 1977 bring your
I D CARD into the INFORMATION DESK at the UNIVERSITY CELLAR
and recieve YOUR $5.00 REFUND.
The LAST ASSESSMENT was made in the FALL of 1975.

LERNER~ & LOEWE'S
ALAN JAY LERNER FREDERICK LOEWE
OLIYER SMITH
CECIL EATON
KEN BILLINGTON
AL FIORILLO
ROBERT RUSSEL D ENNET
and PHIL LANG
TRUDE RITTMAN
JERRY ADLER

UnierstyofMchia
Gilbert and Sullivan Society Presents
PITJEFICE
or bunthorne's bride
0e
O O -
f-

'I

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