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November 19, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-19

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Page 2--Saturday, November 19, 1977-The Michigan Daily
" ChurchWjrs" h ervices

Shenanigans before the game
-"-- Blue blasts

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev.Fred B. Maitland
: The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad stude'nts.
* * '*
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9: 45 a.rm.
Morning Worship-l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.;
u Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.
* * *
\ ,MERICAN BAPTIST
wfAMPUS CENTER AND
sFIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
k_302 E. Huron-663-9376
a. Carroll Arnold, Minister
'11o ald E. Cary, Minister
orship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
~4m.
Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
:45 p.m.

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A Public Servce of ths
rewspaper&eTh eAdvrt snCouncil
We're
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you.
Red Cross.
The Good Neighbor.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Sunday Eucharist at noon.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, Ministers
10 a.m.-Morning Service.
5 p.m.-Informal Worship.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-10 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
* * *
FIRST CHIURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sundav-inder 2 vr:
Christian Scientist Reading Room-
1 206 E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday;
closed Sundays.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCII
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
4:00 p.m.--Undergraduate Fellow-
ship and Supper.
Tuesday-3:30 p.m.-Bonhoffer Sem-
inar.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday, 10:00
p.m.
CAMP US CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7421
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-"If There Wasn't a Hell,
Would You Believe in God?"
6:00 p.m.-Evening Celebration.
* * *
LORD OF LIG HIT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: "Revelation"-
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship Supper-6:00
p.m. ($1.25).
Program-7:00 p.m.-Topic: Discus-
sion of the film "Oh God."
Monday Bible Study: "The First
Prophets"-7:30 p.m.
Kosher Kitchen
at 715 HILL ST.
WILL BE OPEN
Saturday night

S at6:30-12:30 P.M. I
I I

Daily Photo by JOHN KNOX
Dancingona
The targets for the pie-throwing contest never
showed up and the "mystery guest" remained a
mystery, but contestants in the first American Dia-
betes Association (ADA) dance marathon were still
enjoying themselves last night as the 30-hour boogie
shimmied into its final hours in the Union Ballroom.
Six couples in all dragged their heels around the
floor, with couple #1, Mike Quinn and Laurie Fletch-
er, bowingbout after 20 hours to attend a wedding.
Terr Lamb of couple #5 was the next to hit the deck,
as she suffered shin-splints and had to leave the
floor, Herhpartner, Daniel Niemczak, tangoed three
hours on his own before a series of ladies from the
ADA agreed to accompany him.
ONE COUPLE, Janice Falk and Martin Ebel,
joined the fray three hours late, but agreed to dance
through the allotted breaks - half hours every
three hours - to make up the difference. In all they
danced 14 straight hours before sitting down for the
first time.
Dancing was not the only activity in the
ballroom. Jamie Weiss and Nancy Dunitz donated
their lips to the cause, operating a kissing wheel
which offered a random choice of "A peck, a toe
curler, a buss, or a smooch,"all for 50Q.
"We get to put our own definitions on all thesE
words," Dunitz said, "so a smooch, a bus, a toe1
curler, and a peck are all the same thing."
Other activities included balloon shaving and
bubble blowing, and among the 160 prizes were
tickets to this afternoon's Buckeye Waltz.
- ELEONORA di LISCIA

Buckeyes in
brain battle
Woody and Bo both missed it. Although most
people outside of Briarwood Mall yesterday prob-
ably missed it, too, the excitement, action and
tumult of the annual interstate clash of titans has
already taken place. And the Maize and Blue shone
through.
In what was billed as the grand playoff for the
"National Intercollegiate MasterMind Tourna-
ment," two University gamers narrowly defeated a
pair of Buckeye opponents in a tense MasterMind
match.
INVENTED BY an Israeli postal worker less than
a decade ago, MasterMind has since become one of
the world's best selling games, boasting 25 million
players worldwide.
The object of the game is to set a combination of
four pegs-each peg is a different color-in a pat-
tern behind a screen. The opponent then tries to
deduce the color and location of the pegs in as few
guesses as possible.
"To play in the tournament is an ego trip," said
Dan McFadden of Invicta Corporation, the company
which markets the game. "The winner of the tour-
nament-the individual who racks up the lowest
score-goes to the nationals in New York.
"The Big Ten has a good chance to win the world
championship this year ... it really has been inten-
se today. These students are really getting it on."
THE PERSON with the lowest (that is, best)
overall score was University graduate math student
Tony Audas. Computers playing the game averaged
between 4.1 and 4.2 estimates per round; Audas
never scored above 5.0 in nine rounds.
"I programmed a programmable calculator to
play MasterMind against me," he explained. "You
don't have to worry about a calculator getting
bored."
Audas said he is looking forward to going to the
nationals the day after Thanksgiving, because he
will once again be competing against computers..
Instead of human competitors, the machines will be
programmed to supply the peg combinations to be
deciphered.
THE TOURNAMENT was one of 16 sponsored
across the country by Invicta, all involving bitter
college rivals like Michigan and Ohio State.
One person summed up the Wolverine sentiment
prevalent among the onlookers. He said:
"It's been close. It's really been a lot like a foot-
ball game, but just like tomorrow, I think Michigan
will come out on top."
Oh yes, and the final score? In a fiercely fought,
come-from-behind victory, our team reigned vic-
torious, 98 to 100. Take that, Buckeyes!
-R. J. SMITH

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Woody eged on
The Fat Man came up with egg on his face
yesterday as about 300 spectators gathered on the
Diag to watch a group of Maize and Blue amateur
inventors demonstrate devices constructed "to hurl
grade-A large eggs at the biggest dummy of them
all."
"The biggest dummy" was a life-size effigy of
Ohio State football coach Woody Hayes, and the
contraptions turned out to be an assortment of
flingers, pitchers and shooters that looked like one
.of Rube Goldberg's bad dreams.
A CROWD pleaser was graduate studenT Steven
Rocklin's rocket powered egg thrower. In Rocklin's
creation, the egg is placed in the nose cone of the
rocket, a method which Rocklin's roommate Mark
Krauss claimed could enable the egg-chucker to hit
a target at 200 feet.
Attempting to prove that complexity isn't always
the best answer, John Majkowski built a large
slingshot.
"We clocked the egg at 120 miles per hour," said
Majkowski, who won a similar contest two years
ago by nailing a Woody effigy with a water balloon.
NOT ALL THE devices had blueprints. Lee Ben-
son and Bill Powers decided to enter the contest
Thursday night.
"We're kind of tired," Powers said. "We started
working at 11 p.m. and finished at 4 a.m."
In the end it was Jim Logan, a senior in
mechanical engineering, who had the best yolk on
Woody by capturing first prize. But for most of the
fans, it was only a prelude to the egg-citement this
afternoon.

-Beth Rosenberg

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Bukovsky tells of Soviet terror
(Continued from Page 1)

T
* o you
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eitr. nease ouusTampax
tampons.aeuiul eind
You donjtoy eepitncfing '
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means there's far less chance
No wonder you'd never con-
But,-ms - imprtantTmp-

Arrested in 1967 and again in 1972,
Bukovsky said his fight for freedom
was always his "crime".
THE PRISONER of conscience
told receptive listeners yesterday
that President Carter's human rights
campaign has been a tremendous
boost for the dissident movement.
Carter's diplomacy has promoted the
treatment of dissidents to "another
level of discussion," he said.
"Before, junior authorities could
make arbitrary decisions. Now,
when it is connected with the
relations between two countries, any
decision must be taken to higher
levels - the Politburo and the KGB."
Estimating there are about 20,000
political prisoners - officially classi-
fied as "dangerous state criminals"
- Bukovsky hastened to add that the
Soviet Union's population of 250
million is not much better off.
"THE ENTIRE, population of the
country is in a state of terror and
fear," he said. "The 'silent majority'
is frightened to speak openly but
have the same opinion as we (dissi-
dents) have."
But the dissident was skeptical
over whether American audiences,
"who take freedom for granted,''
could really understand this sort of
fear. "It's very difficult to under-
stand, unless you don't have it (free-

dom). Once you're deprived of it, you
start to suffocate," he explained.
At yesterday morning's press con-
ference, Bukovsky criticized West-
ern trade policy toward the Soviets.
The West undermined the position of
intellectuals and scientists, who
wanted internal reforms for the
liberalization of technology, he said.

'"As an alternative, the party ap-
paratus proposed to get technology
with the Western sidde, and there-
fore, avoiding the necessity of mak-
ing reforms inside the country," he
said. "Westerners were stupid
enough to grant it, extend trade and
make available to them modern tech-
nology."

MSA ballots recounted

(Continued from Page 1)
the college. Such representatives
would then comprise the entire
Assembly.
Had the amendment not passed,
MSA would have abided by a consti-
tutional provision that calls for
abolition of all seats from the Assem-
bly held by appointed representa-
tives.
THE AMENDMENT passed
Thursday calls for an extension of the
terms of present appointed represen-
tatives. Since Gibson is a School of
Library Science appointed represen-
tative, he is virtually assured of a
continuation of his appointed seat,
and thus wished to withdraw from
the running for the elected seats.
The other JOB party candidate,
Thomas Danko, finished tenth in the
balloting after receiving many of
Gibson's transferred votes. The vote
redistribution is allowed under the

I
1

FALAFIL SPECIAL:
FREE french fries
with falifil.

I
I
I

preferential voting system used by
MSA. "He wouldn't have won if I
hadn't withdrawn," Gibson had said
Thursday night. Danko lost his seat
in the recount.
"I called up (Election Director)
Monte Fowler Tuesday night and told
him that if the amendment passed I
might wish to withdraw from the
race," said Gibson. "He (Fowler)
told me it would be okay."
"I DID tell him that it would be
okay," Fowler said last night. "Last
year a person also dropped during
the counting."
According to Fowler, last night's
recount results will be submitted to
the Central Student Judiciary (CSJ)
as the "correct results" for certifica-
tion. CSJ certifies all such elections.
Any challenges to the results will be
heard at the certification hearing,
tentatively scheduled for Monday
night.
Senior Eric Arnson, in the results
tabulated Thursday night, accumu-
lated the most first-choice votes (320)
of any MSA candidate in recent
years. Arnson compiled almost three
times the number of votes of his
nearest competitor. Less than 2,000
students voted in the election open to
all University students.
ARNSON attributed his success to
a coordinated campaign organization
and acceptance of his ideas by a wide
range of voters.

Lots of p e4jt
(Continued from Pace 1
asshole. At least Bo hasn't taken
down side line markers."
The crowd cheered wildly as a
skewered Buckeye dummy became
engulfed in the bonfire flames. "Burn
Woody!" they chanted. However, one
muffled voice mumbled, "How sadis-
tic."
RATHER THAN avoid flying
sparks from the bonfire, the fans
casually brushed away the cinders
and maintained their positions to
hear speakers Bo Schembechler and
Bob Ufer, among others.
The crowd hushed as Bo took the
microphone and praised his gridders.
"This is the greatest single football
game played in America," he shout-
ed. "And every Michigan man and
woman is here to win!"
The crowd responded with gushes
of "We're gonna win - we're really
gonna win!" and "Go Blue!"
RADIO announcer Ufer further in-
cited the mob with a frenzied tally of
championship holdings, "This is the
right kind of Meechigan spirit," the
Voice bellowed.
Sounding much like the emotional
Ufer himself, Paul Edwards of
Detroit panted, "Bob Ufer is fantas-
tic and he tells you everything like
where you stand in the game and we
have a sign in Section 39 that says
Meechigan. You tell him that."
Onlookers weren't the only Wol-
verine fans attending the spirited
rally. Athletic Supporter Limited, the
originators of the Michigan "digit"
t-shirt, set up business on a parked
car. "For the more conservative, we
have a thumbs down for Ohio State,"
said owner Sandy Berris.
FANS PERCHED in trees peered
over the "Screw the Buckeyes"
stand, where loyal fans could pur-
chase an authentic buckeye pierced
with a screw.

L ""-"-""""-"""- -""""

The University of Michigan Housing Division and LS&A
PILOT PROGRAM/ALICE LLOYD HALL
POSITION OPENING: Resident Advisor-Alice Lloyd Hall
(UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN'S CORRIDOR)
Margot Morrow, Building Director for Pilot Program/Alice Lloyd Hall has announced a Resident
Advisor position opening on a women's corridor for the Winter Term 1978.
Candidates must be enrolled in a graduate degree program. Preference will be given to those
who, in addition to corridor advising, are also able to teach a credit mini-course in the
Winter Semester and/or can co-direct a new Pilot Program field placement project. Full details
are available from the Pilot Program Office, Alice Lloyd Hall, 100 Observatory St., 764-7521.
Margot and the nominating committee will review the applications and resumes and will
contact individuals whose background and experience coincides with the position open to
arrange an interview time.
REMUNERATION: 100% room and board plus a $200.00 stipend
for the academic responsibilities.

SUNDAY I WEDNESDAY I
I music by
I Wild Bill ISub Day
7:30 p.m. I $1.29 I
""-"-------"--"'---------"-------- ---"----- ----------- --- --- --
DMONDAY I THURSDAY
I DOLLAR DAYSI
Piz e cGreSubNite 1

i

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