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November 13, 1977 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-13

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, November 13, 1977-Page 7

Sinelairs '60s spirit fizzles out;

PR wor
(Continued from Page 1)
the last 50 years."
"I've always been primarily iivolved
in music,, trying to .deal with the
Srelatioinship between music and
% politicians and music and socio-:
economic levels," says Sinclair, who
achieved notoriety as the outspoken
manger of the MC5, a successful
Detroit rock band.
SINCLAIR BECAME involved with
the MC5in the mid '60s and stayed with'
the group until he was imprisoned in
1969. During his years with the band,
Sinclair formed his anti-Establishment
view of society.
Through, the group's performances,
Sinclair says, "the ideas we had as
people began to take shape musically.
We were against the war and the draft,
and we were for getting high and taking.
off our clothes."
' During the '60s, Sinclair says he and
his cohorts defined their goals for the
M country'"not as what we wanted, but as.
what we didn't want.""They advocated
a "free society" which would eliminate
' capitalism and create a "communal
societal and economic organization.";M
"THEY WERE real utopian ideas,"
reflects Sinclair of his old philosophy.
"' blush to enumerate them as if they
had any real meaning in everyday
life." /
But," he adds, "I hesitate to
1Walk.
Just for the
health of it.
Get moving, America!
March 1-7 1977 is
National Physlcal Education and Sport Week

takes
disassociate myself with these ideas.
They're' beautiful and I hope to have
those ideas as long as I live. I'm just not
rash enough at this point in my life to
think that by trumpeting these ideas in
an abrasive way, that you're going to
'win over converts."
Sinclair says he believes former ac-
tivists like himself are now accepted by
society and no longer feel a need for
protest. As a result of changes wrought
in the '60s, he says he is now comfor-
table enough to abandon revolution as a
political strategy.
"I THINK THE culture in general ab-
sorbed many elements of the protest
movement. Limits have been extended
so that it's now possible to do more
creative things in life than it was," ex-
plains Sinclair. "Now, you can be an in-
teresting person and still have a job."
Personally, Sinclair says he is still
committed to the radical causes of the
'60s. But a 1972 back injury has since
made health the "central factor" in his
life.
"The first thing I did was curtail my
activities that didn't relate directly to
making a living," he recalls. "I have
maintained an interest, but I've just
had a hard time remaining active in
political work."
SINCLAIR SAYS he has noticed a
definite local and national trend away
from political activism.

lace

of activism

"The mass movement was basically
made up of students who graduated and
were thrust into the world and had to
Seek employment," he explains.
4In the '60s there was this
phehomenon of people throwing them-
selves into the breech unreservedly,
living day-to-~day without looking back.
After a while a lot of people burned out
physically and mentally. Besides, there
were other pressures like making a
living and having children who were
growing up."
Sinclair, himself, has a wife and
child, despite his bizarre living
arrangements.
. Accordingv to 'Sinclair, the '60s
protesters were willing to adopt an un-
stable lifestyle because they dreaded
the thought of joining mainstream
America.
"The alternative was so boring-to be
a square, to be a straight American and
all that it meant," he says. "The danger
(police harassment) uas worth it:
because at least you were alive, you
were doing something you could relate
to."
But those still advocating ,radical
change today, Sinclair says;, have
become isolated because most if the
issues upon which they focused their

concern have now disappeared.
"Not to say it's Utopia," Sinclair ad-
mits, "but look ,back .ten years and
tremendous strides have been made.
"People have had enough sense to
realize that the radical apocalyptic
changes aren't going to happen by
marching in the streets."
Five hundred students from 75 Indian
tribes and blends are involved in the
Indian education program at Brigham
Young University. While the national
graduation average for Indian students
is four per cent of those who begin
classes, the BYU average is 30 per cent.

Ma
pro]
(Continued from-Page 1)
Adds TA Barkley: "The only time
it ever comes up is when we razz him
about something we've seen in the
news."
Though Wheeler's University title
- Professor of Microbiology -
sounds lofty, his contact with stu-
dents is a little less so. During the
lab, he'll circulate among the stu-
dents, answer their questions, and
see that the experiments run without
a hitch.
GROFSOREAN describes Wheel-
er as "a pretty average guy" during
labs. "I don't see anything com-
promised in his teaching just
because he's mayor. To us, he's a
professor of microbiology and that's
it."

'or as
lessor

Wheeler himself thinks lightly f
the fact that in a town where the
University and the community often
cross swords, he's firmly connected
with both.
"I try not to let my associatiop
with the University interfere witp
what I do for the city," he says.
"Sometimes when the University
snaps its fingers, everyboidy in the
city jumps. I understand there's
community viewpoint, too."
Wheeler says he wishes his Unt
versity colleagues would mesh-theie
academic lives with the community.,
"The opportunity to serve the co
munity is a challenge," say
Professor Wheeler. "There's mor
to the world than classrooms and
laboratories."

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