100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I
cE.

Page 2-Tuesday, November 1, 1977-The Michigan Doily
S.Africn itra

Editig * Writin
Eiig* rtnanslating * Graphics
Experienced Editors
in All Fields
Pick-up and Delivery
Phone: 668-8899

oft"

Open mornings
at 10 a.m. and at
reduced prices 'tl
6 p.m. Monday-Friday
BOWLING and
BILLIARDS
At theUNION

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (AP) -
The United States, Britain and France
vetoed three African resolutions in the
Security Council yesterday that called
for economic sanctions and other
stringent measures against South
Africa.
The 15-member council unanimously
approved a fourth African resolution
condemning the white-minority govern-
ment in Pretoria for its resort to
'massive violence and repression"
against black South Africans and "all
other opponents" of apartheid.
THAT RESOLUTION also demands
the South African government release
all persons imprisoned under security
laws and for opposition to its racial poli-
cies, and lift bans on organizations and
newspapers opposed to apartheid.
The U.N. African group demanded in-

ternational sanctions two weeks ago af-
ter the latest South African crackdown
on black dissidents and other opponents
of its racial segregation policies.
The triple veto came after the two
sides were unable to agree on a com-
promise position in negotiations that
began late last week.
THE THREE permanent Western
council members, supported by West
Germany and Canada on the council,
have proposed only a six-month manda-
tory arms embargo - subject to renew-
al - against South Africa.

de san
The three vetoed resolutions were
killed by identical votes of 10-5, with
Canada and West Germany joining the
three veto-wielding Western powers.
One resolution would have called for.
a ban on investments and loans to
South Africa and an end to government
encouragement of trade with South
Africa.
THE OTHER TWO would have im-.
posed a permanent arms embargo and
would have declared South African poli-
cies a threat to international peace and
security, thereby paving the way for

CtionS
tougher sanctions, including possible
expulsion from the United Nations.
After the votes, the council suspended
debate to allow the two sides to resume
negotiations on a compromise resolu-
tion calling for a mandatory arms em-
bargo.
Before casting the "no" votes, U.S.
Ambassador Andrew Young spoke out
against the move to put the three
resolutions to a vote, terming it "a
callous and insensitive attempt to
divide us."
Britain and France were known to be
more firmly opposed than the United,

High court: Reporters mu

MASS COMMUNICATION
BROWN BAG SEMINAR
The Howard R. Marsh Center for the Study of
Performance is showing a special public seminar.-
JEREMY TUNSTALL
Professor of Sociology, City University of London

Journalistic

The Media Are American"
Wednesday, Nov. 2-12:10 p.m.
institute for Social Research, Room 6050

sources;
WASHINGTON (AP) -The Su-
preme Court yesterday supported
states with tough drunken-driving
laws, dealt a blow to news reporters
seeking to protect confidential
sources, and placed in jeopardy a
consumers' victory over insurance
companies.
Taking action in more than 200
cases, the justices also agreed to
LSAT
WE CAN INCREASE
YOUR LSA T SCORE
Call or Write:
University LSAT Preparation Service Inc.
2200 Fuller Rd., Suite 9128
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105
313-995-4014

state
review obscenity prosec
California and an Alaska 1
ing job preferences for.
dents in non-public jobs.
THE COURT gave wha
to an endorsement of state
suspend the driver's Ii
motorists who refuse t
chemical or breath ana
after being stopped fo
drunken driving -'even
motorist receives no pre-,
hearing.
The justices threw out
court's decision striking
Massachusetts law calli
90-day license suspension
refusals on grounds that
motorists their due-process
They told a three-judge
Boston to restudy the case
a Supreme Court decision
which upheld an Illinois la-A
ing revocation or suspen
driver's license without pr

LSASubcommittee on
Distribution Requirements
TELL US YOUR PLAN-
DISTRIBUTION, THAT IS!
OPEN HEARINGS, TONIGHT
7:30-9:30 2203 ANGELL HA
* Tell us why you chose your distribution pla
* general feelings, frustrations, gripes, suggestio
The End Report Affects You!
0P -

drinking lai
cutions in hearings.
aw requir- THE JUSTICES unanimously
state resi- ruled that holding such hearings in
every case in which the state found a
t amounts driver's record bad enough to take
laws that action would impede administrative
censes of efficiency and prove a danger to the
o take a highways.
alysis test All 50 states have laws requiring
r alleged temporary license suspension for
when the refusal to take breath analysis tests
suspension and the like, but only 13 make no
provision for pre-suspension hear-
t a lower ings.
down a In addition to Massachusetts, those
ng for a states are Alabama, Alaska, Iowa,
n for test Mississippi, M-ontana, Rhode Island,
it denies Missouri, New Hampshire, New
rights. Mexico, New York, Delaware and
e court in Maine.
in light of THE HIGH court refused to review
last May the contempt of court conviction of
v authoriz- an Idaho newspaper reporter - an
sion of a indication that the justices believe
eliminary reporters have no right under any
circumstances to withhold informa-
tion from a court or grand jury.
* The court's refusal measn James
"Jay" Shelledy of the Lewiston
* Tribune now faces a 30-day jail
* sentence for refusing to disclose to a
* state court the name of a police
source he quoted in an article which,
* sparked a libel suit against the news-
* paper.
In 1972, the Supreme Court ruled
that reporters enjoy no special rights
r to protect their news sources in
LL 9 criminal cases. Shelledy's refusal,,
0 however, came in a civil case - the
in libel suit over his article.
SHELLEDY'S attorney, Reed -
)ns. Clements of Lewiston, said his client
* could end up serving more than ,30
" days in jail.
* Saying Shelledy - probably will
serve the sentence in the Latah
County Jail, Clements added that
after 30 days "he would probably be
brought before the court again and
asked to reveal the source. This could
continue, the sentence would not be
just for 30 days," Clements said.
The Supreme Court agreed to re-
view a lower court's ruling that gives
consumers the right to sue insurance
companies in federal courts under
antitrust laws.
THE COURT'S review of an appeal
filed by four insurance firms makes
less secure a victory won by a group
of Rhode Island doctors and their pa-

,
vetoed
States to some of the tough African
proposals.
Meanwhile, about 87,00 students ip
the black South African township of
Soweto, near Johannesburg, defied a
government order and continued their
boycott of classes. The government
said they would have to repeat the
academic year if they missed exams
starting yesterday. About 300,00aO
students are boycotting classes nation-
wide to protest what they consider an
inferior black education system.
st reveal
wsuphek
tients in the U.S. Circuit Court- of
Appeals in Boston. The Supreme
Court might uphold the lower court's
ruling after studying the case more
closely, but it took the votes- of at
least four of the nine justices to grant
review.
While the Rhode Island case in-
volves malpractice insurance, the
lower court's ruling appears to open
the federal courts to consumers of all
types of insurance who feel they're
being cheated by their companies,
At issue is an interpretation of a
federal antitrust law, the McCarran
Ferguson Act.
THE LAW exempts insurance come
panies from antitrust suits except foi'
cases involving "boycott, coercion or
intimidation," but past court rulings
have interpreted that language to
apply only to insurance agents or
companies and not to consumers.
The Rhode Island case represents
the first time a federal court has
ruled that consumers have the right
to take insurance companies to court
under antitrust laws. M
The doctors and patients sued St;
Paul Fire & Marine, Hartford, Aetn4
and Travelers on charges that the
four companies conspired to make
unavailable a certain type of mal-
practice insurance.
IN OTHER matters yesterday, the
court:
Agreed to decide whether chile
dren should be included in the
definition of a comrunity wher:
obscene materials are being judged
by "community standards." William
Pinkus, who was convicted in a Lod
materials, says children should have
been excluded from such a definitior
because'h mailed his Pu'blic tns to
adults only.
" Agreed to decide whether Alask4
constitutionally may require privat'
employers involved in any oil or gas
activities to hire Alaska resident'
before out-of-state workers.
" Barred former Attorney General
John Mitchell and ex-White House
aide John Erlichman from practicing
law before the Supreme Court be-
cause of their Watergate cover-up
convictions. Both officials of former
President Richard Nixon's admims
tration are federal prisoners and
already have been disbarred by other
courts.

TSEMINARS
ROGRAMS BEGIN
EMBER.
cember or February? *
ires Amity's unique
ce the exam alone when
of test specialists on your
s of the nation's most
n for the LSAT:
KEND SCHEDULING
SAT TEST DATE
void conflict with academic
ystematic, strategy-minded
tice testing. Full-length
)w-up workshop.:
PECIALIZED
4PPROACH
available. because each
SAT area he teaches:Each
t instructors. specializing in
it. math, and legal reasoning.
AGE CLASS SIZE,
nvolvement than in any other
?nt-faculty ratio. Small seminar
imum of 18 students (and an
ctors give constant careful
s. problems, and analysis
ATED CURRICULUM
evised for the 1977"78
tantial changes in LSAT
naterial, concentrating on the
of question difficulty. best
of the exam.

HIS' SPACE- N CO iBL

k BY THE PUBLISHER

/

Amity
LSA
DECEMBER-TEST PI
THROUGHOUT NOV
Faking the Law Boards in De
Thorough preparation requ
personal approach. Why fa
you can have Amity's team(
side? Consider the resource
student-oriented preparatior
- CONVENIENT WEEP
CLOSE TO EACH L
Intensive courses arranged to a
schedules. Thirty class hours. S
instruction with integrated prac
practice exam with flexible folc
.*NATION'S MOST S1
TEAM-TEACHING A
The most expert test instruction
instructor is a specialist in the L
student works with five differen
writing, logic. business judgmen
* 12-STUDENT AVER)
More individual attention and it
course. The nation's best stude
classes have a guaranteed max
average class size of 12). lnstru
attention to individual question
of errors.
* CONTINUALLY-UPD
A teaching curriculum wholly r
testing year.reflecting the subs
content. Challenging practice n
upper half of the LSAT s range
prepares students for the rigors

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan