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October 20, 1977 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1977-10-20

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a' 7

Page 2-Thursday, October 20, 1977-The Michgan Daily
House-Senate committee stalls
utility handling of energy devices

: First witness confirms Korean
bribes in TV ethics hearing

WASHINGTON (AP)-Members of a
Hotse-Senate conference committee
were eyeing - possible compromises
yesterday to enable utilities to install
hvtne insulation and other energy-
PROPER INSULATION
' AMOUNT IMPORTANT
$KOKIE, Ill. (AP) - Too much
inlation can be just as bad as too
little insulation when it comes to
saving money for heating and cool-
ing, says Mario J. Catani, an
engineer and director of the Portland
Cement Association's building con-
struction department.
Qatani says homeowners must
work out a combination of insulation
and building materials that will yield
the maximum in energy savings.
For concrete or other heavy ma-
sonry walls, about 11/2 inches of wall
insulation is the optimum amount,
Catani says, adding that too much
insulation can actually increase heat-
ing fuel costs by negating the effects
of solar energy on the roof and walls
of a house.
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saving devices when requested by con-
sumers.
As the panel sought accord on its first
energy issue, President Carter hinted
that he might cancel or postpone his
overseas trip next month if Congress
does not finish work on an energy bill by
then.
fHE CONFERENCE panel is trying
to reconcile the wide House and Senate
differencesin the energy legislation.
Carter, who favors the House bill
because it contains most of his energy
proposals, met with House Democrats
on the negotiating panel yesterday to
discuss strategy.
Two House conferees told reporters af-
ter the White House session that Carter
had promised to remain in Washington
until the House and Senate differences
have been resolved.
ONE DIFFERENCE between the
bills concerns whether utilities should
be allowed to install home insulation.
Under the House-passed bill, utilites
could do this work directly. They also
could install a variety of other energy-
saving devices, such as furnace
modifications designed to save fuel..
Under the House bill, the utilities could

loan consumers money to pay for the
improvements.
The Senate bill prohibits utilities
from doing the work or the financing
themselves, although it permits them to
help consumers mike the necessary
arrangements.
CARTER TOLD the House members
of the committee that the nation would
be "deeply disappointed" if Congress
doesn't enact an energy bill this year.
Two members of the conference
panel, Reps. Henry Reuss, (D-Wis.),
and Thomas Ashley, (D-Ohio), told
reporters that Carter vowed to put off
his four-continent trip if necessary to
stay in town to voice support for his
energy proposals.
Ashley said Carter was "willing to
stay in Washington and help us ... as
long as it takes." Carter is scheduled to
begin the overseas-trip on Nov. 22.
WHITE HOUSE officials said that
Carter's suggestion was calculated to
discourage opponents on the conference
panel from trying to delay votes on key
issues until the President had left town.
If such tactics are tried, Carter stan-
ds ready to make good on his promise to
cancel his trip, the officials said.
But Reuss and Ashley said they ex-
pected the conference panel to com-
plete its work before the trip is
scheduled to begin.

WASHINGTON (AP)-A South Korean embassy, of-
ficial ended a brief courtesy call on a congressman by
leaving an evelope stuffed with $100 bills, a Capitol Hill
secretary told a House committee yesterday.
Nan Elder said that when her boss, Rep. Larry Winn
Jr., discovered the envelope was filled with money, he told
her, "Return it or get rid of it."
THE INCIDENT in September 1972 was part of what
was described as a South Korean government effort
aimed at the "seduction and buying of American leaders,
particularly in the Congress."
"Because of what has come to light in our investigation,
buttressed by the present attitude of the South Korean
government, there are compelling indications that the
South Korean government. . . was engaged in an effort to
influence members of Congress by giving them valuable
gifts," special counsel Leon Jaworski told the House
ethics committee.
Jaworski made the statement in opening remarks as the
ethics panel began a nationally televised hearing into
what could become one' of the worst scandals in
congressional history.
HE SAID THE Seoul regime has withheld cooperation in
the investigation because he would not agree to drop the
probe before it reaches into the South Korean government.
A former official of the Korean embassy identified the
visitor to Winn's office as Dong Jo Kim, then the am-
bassador and now the South Korean minister of foreign af-
fairs.

Elder said Winn, who was in a hurry to leave the office,
left the envelope unopened in his desk. Later, he called
Elder and told her to see what was in the envelope.
"THERE WAS more money in the envelope than I had
ever seen in my life," she testified. "There was a stack of
hundred dollar bills.. . about an inch high."
Elder said she tried to locate the visitor through the
Korean embassy and was told he was paying a call on
another congressman. The second congressman was not
identified.
She said she located the Korean, he returned to Winn's
office, and she gave the money back to him.
ANOTHER WITNESS, Jai Hyon Lee, former official
spokesman for the embassy, described high level staff
meetings in the embassy at which Korean Central In-
telligence Agency officials outlined plans to use money
and favors to assure continuing support of the United
States for the government of President Park Chung-hee of
South Korea.
Lee said the Park government was "very much worried
about the possibility of losing United States support-mili-
tary, economic and political."
Lee left his embassy post in June 1973 and received
political asylum in the United States. He now teaches
journalism at Western Illinois University.
The former embassy attache told the House committee
that only about 10 embassy officials, including the am-
bissador, were allowed to attend discussions of the in-
fluence-buying scheme.

44~
4
A

J g
Just for the
health of it.
Get moving, America!
March 1-7. 1977 is
National Physical Education and Sport Week
Physical Education Public Information
American Alliance for Heaith.
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 16th St N W . Washington. DC 20036

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PROFS UNEFFECTED:
Senate sets retirement age at 70

i

~ 2
So smooth. Easy to sip. Delicious!
Comfort®'s unlike any other liquor.
It tastes good just poured over ice.
That's why it makes mixed drinks
taste much better, too.

K

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate
passed legislation-yesterday that would
give most American workers the choice
of whether to keep on the job until age
70. 4
But tenured university professors
and some high-paid business executives
could still be forded to retire at age 65
under the proposal.
THE BILL, which eventually could
affect about 70 per cent of the U.S. labor
fore, now goes to a conference com-
mittee which will try to work out dif-
ferences between the Senate bill and
one passed earlier by the House.
Sen. Harrison Williams Jr. (D-N.J.),
chairmain of the Human Resources
Committee, said the Senate bill, passed
88-7, would end discrimination against
elderly workers.

"It is a matter of basic civil rights
that individuals be treated in em-
ployment solely on the basis their
ability to perform a job," he said. "A
fundamental need of older people is to
remain an active member of society."
WILLIAMS DISPUTED opponents of
the bill who claimed that giving
workers ,five more years on the job
would reduce employment oppor-
tunities for the young, women and
minorities.
He .said the Labor D'epartment
estimates that raising the mandatory
retirement age to 70 would result in an
increase in the labor force of about
200,000 people a year at most.
The law would not become effective
until Jan. 1, 1979 to give businesses time
to adjust to the new retirement age. But

all contracts agreed to through collec-
tive bargaining must be in compliance
with the higher retirement age by Jan.
1, 1980.
ONE OF THE main points of conten-
tion in the House-Senate conference
committee will be whether to ban for-
ced retirement for federal workers,
who now must retire at 70. The House
called for such a prohibition, but the
Senate left the current provision un-
changed.
Another fight is expected over the
Senate's decision to allow university
and college employers to force tenured
professors to retire at age 65.
The Senate bill, also unlike the House
version, gives businesses the right to
force executives and others to retire at
65 if they receive $20,000 or more in
retirement benefits, excluding Social
Security income.

THE SENATE deleted from the bill a
stipulation that would have kept the
retirement age of all elementary and
secondary school teachers at age 65,
too. It was changed to 70.
Voting against the bill were Sens.
Dewey Bartlett (R-Okla.); Carl Curtis
(R-Neb.); Robert Griffin (R-Mich.); S.
I. Hayakawa (R-Calif.); James Mc-
Clure (R-Idaho); Adali Stevenson (D-
.I11.) ; and Malcolm Wallop (R-
Wyomir).

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In a magnificent full-
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