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October 02, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-02

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The Michigan Doily-Sunday, October 2, 1977-Page 3

.

HELD IN NEUTRAL COUNTRY

CYUMSEE ff-WS AKENCALL -Jy
IHappenings ..
get off to a slow but lavish start today at noon when the Fall Art
Fair begins its second day of craft exhibits and musical entertainment
on the Community High School grounids, until 6 p.m.... and, coin-
cidentally across the street, the Farmer's Market will be holding its'
Fall Harvest Festival ... on a more serious note, area residents are in-
vited to join in a 10-mile Walk for Hunger, sponsored by the Interfaith
Council, beginning at 1:30 p.m. from St. Clare's Episcopal/Temple
Beth Emeth, 2309 Packard ... and you'll need a sponsor/contribu-
tor to donate money toward the alleviation of world famine ... from
1-5 p.m., the "Actors Ensemble," a new theater group, will be holding
auditions in 4203 Mich. Union ... or, for the hearty physical types, the
Outing Club meets at the same time for a(no doubt rainy) hike, at the
Rackham N. Entry ... the Ark features a 3 p.m. recital by the Classical
Guitar Society, starring Pamela Kimmel ... and the sole evening oc-
curence is the St. Mary's Student Chapel's seminar on the Psychology
of death and dying, with a film, discussion and talk ... that's at 8 p.m.
at the corner of Thomson and William Sts.... On Monday, events also
kick off at noon with a brown bag lunch as the folks from the Ctr. for
Near Eastern and N. African studies, and Allan Christelow, discuss
"Marriage, Divorce and Pre-emption in the Eghris Plain, 1853-1856"
in the Commons Rm. at Lane Hall ... at 4 p.m. you'll be torn between
an English/MARC lecture by Oxford University's Malcolm Parks en-
titled "What Did an Anglo-Saxon Book Look Like to an Anglo Saxon?",
in the Cook Rm., N. Entrance, Law Quad, and another lecture by
Sheilia Widnall of MIT on "The Instability of the Vortex Ring" at 206
W. Engineering ... or, in a third language, you can take your kids to at-
tend a 4-5 p.m. registration period for gradeschool Spanish lessons, in
the International Center's Pound House ... at 7:30, attend a meeting of
the Southern Africa Liberation Committee in Rm. 2308 Mich. Union
or listen to speakers from the Gay Advocated Office in Alice Lloyd
Hall's Blue Carpet Lounge, also at 7:30 ... and from 7-9 p.m., the Child
& Family Service of Washtenaw County is sponsoring a session on
"Emotional Aspects of Aging," in his office at 2301 Platt Rd. for
anyone interested in registering for their six-session program ... for
information or enrollment fees, call 971-6520.
Burning desire?
The Rev. John Withers, a Southern Baptist minister in suburban
Cleveland, was disappointed as heck last week when area officials
banned a bonfire he had planned to burn bikinis and other instru-
ments of the devil, furnished by local churchgoers. But when the of-
ficials, who were defending air pollution laws, offered him a garbage
truck to replace the torch, Withers waxed enthusiastic. He had called
upon his parishioners to bring "instruments of temptation" - such as.
television sets, books by liberal authors, hard rock albums and bikinis
- to a ceremonial bonfire today. On being informed the fire would be
illegal, the minister said he would settle for the garbage truck; though
leaning toward a small-scale, legal, barbecue because of its "sym-
bolism." "We just want to exalt Jesus Christ," he explained.
On the outsider
Get set for another mournful day or so. Today will be - You
'guessed it - cloudy, and showers will linger on through tonight. The
winds will be blowing cool and fast from the northeast at 13-17 m.p.h.,
putting the high temperature at about 60* and dragging the low down
to a brisk 44*. Good studying weather will continue tomorrow under
partly cloudy skies and even cooler temperatures with a high expected
in the mid-50's.,

U.S., U4
LONDON (AP) - The United
States and Britain hope to organize a
new conference in a neutral country
on a final constitutional settlement
for Rhodesia, according to senior
diplomats here.
They said yesterday that the
government of Mauritius in the
Indian Ocean has offered facilities
for such a parley.
THE U.S.-BRITISH plan as report-.
ed by the diplomats is likely to mean
rejection of a bid .by Prime Minister
Ian Smith of Rhodesia to have
Pakistan to
defer vote
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) --
Gen. Mohammed Zia ul-Haq, head of
Pakistan's marital-law government,
1 announced an indefinite postpone-
ment yesterday of national elections
scheduled for Oct. 18, Zia also banned
all political activity in the country.'
"The very, existence and integrity
of the country is at present at stake,"
he said in a televised nationwide
address. He said political activity is{
creating a situation that "threatens
law and order.'
ZIA AND OTHER military com-
manders deposed elected Prime
Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto on July
5, ending four months of bloody
political strife touched off by opposi-
tion charges that Bhutto's Pakistan
People's Party (PPP) had rigged
national elections last March.
Zia then scheduled new elections
for Oct. 18 between the PPP and the
opposition Pakistan ,National Alli-
ance coalition:
Bhutto was arrested by martial-
law authorities and charged with
various offenses, including murder of
political opponents and abuse of
power as prine minister.
The general set no new date for the
voting.

K. plan
Britain's commissioner - Designate
and a special representative of
United Nations Secretary-General
Kurt Waldheim visit him in Salis-
bury, the Rhodesian capital.
Smith has said he wants to discuss
key aspects of American-British pro-
posals for a settlement with Field
Marshal Lord Carver of Britain and
Waldheim's envoy.
"For Lord Carver, as the legal rep-
resentative of Queen Elizabeth II,
and for the U.N. envoy representing
the international community to visit
the pretender-premier of an illegal
state is a totally unacceptable idea,"
one keyofficial said. The British and
others consider Rhodesia's govern-
ment illegal because it unilaterally
declared itself independent from
Britain in 1965.
"YET IT'S NOT for the American-
British promoters of a settlement to
be too rigid and the probability is that
lower level officials will confer with
Smith and with leaders of the black
Rhodesian parties on next steps," the
official added.,
A new phase is imminent in the
12-year-long search for a Rhodesian
settlement since the U.N. Security
Council last Thursday broadly sanc-
tioned Waldheim to name a delegate

Rhodesian talks

to work with Carver in quest of a
constitution.
Under American - British peace
proposals, Smith would be required
to make way for Carver, who then
would preside over the arrangements
designed to lead the white-governed,
former British colony to legal state-
hood on the basis of black majority
rule.
SMITH AND, LEADERS of key
black Rhodesian factions have ob-
jected to various elements in the
British-American plan. But Washing-
ton and London have undertaken to
clarify and maybe even amend
certain parts by general agreement.
This will call for a new round of
preliminary negotiations with all the
parties and with leaders of Rho-
desia's neighbor states, including
South Africa, Zambia, Mozambique,
Tanzania, Botswana and Angola.
Special U.S. and British envoys
Stephen Low and John Graham are
due to conduct these.
The Rhodesian government an-
nounced yesterday that Prime Minis-
ter Smith had met secretly for eight
hours last Sunday with President
Kenneth Kaunda of black-governed
Zambia to discuss U.S.-British pro-
posals to bring black-majority rule to

Rhodesia and U.N.-sppnsored efforts
to arrange a cease-fire in the
five-year-old guerrilla war.
SOUTH AFRICA, according to
these plans, already is under inform-
al notice it would risk an oil embargo
itself unless it joins in the mandatory
U.N.hsanctions campaign against its
neighbor.
A Commonwealth c o m m i t t e e
charged with examining the oil
sanctions issue concluded a secret
report last week by saying it would
'see no alternative to seeking from
the Security Council a decision to im-
pose in mandatory form an embargo
on the supply of crude oil and=
petroleum products to South Africa
itself" if it refuses to guarantee a
,cutoff of the oil flow to Rhodesia.

THE FIRST 10
PEOPLE ON
MONDAY
Get A FREE
PINBALL GAME
AT
UNION LANES
open 10a.m.

____.

Daily Official Bulletin
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2,1977
Day Calendar
WUOM: Options in Education: "Community and
Junior Colleges", First part of two programs ex-
ploring the boom in two year colleges, looking at the
changing images and impact of these institutions, 1
p.m.
General Notice
PRESIDENT'S STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
ADDIESS. President Fleming will give his annual
address to faculty and staff in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre at 8:00 p.m., Mnday, October 3, 1977.
Distinguished faculty awards will be -presented
during the program. A reception in the Michigan
League will follow the ceremony. The meeting is
open to all members of the University community.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXVIII, No. 22
Sunday. October 2,1977
N edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
tail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
V1.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
OPEN TONIGHT
TILL 1 A.M.
BILLIARDS,
BOWLING,
AND
PINBALL
at the UNION
Sunday is.. .
Imported
Bottle Beer
NIght
featuring:
Beers from
Every Country
atCa
GREAT PRICEI

JEAN COCTEAU DOUBLE FEATURE
THE BLOOD OF A POET (AT 7)
Early classic of experimental avant-garde cinema.,Made in 1930, it is "A
REAL DOCUMENTARY COMPOSED OF UNREAL HAPPENINGS."
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (at 9:05)
This surreal rendition of the old fairytale is an enjoyable cinematic
experience for young and old alike
MON: DIE NIEOELUNGEN (I & iI) (free)
TIlS: THE BAD SLEEP WELL (FREE)

CINEMA GUILD

EACH: 1.50
50TH: $2.50

OLD ARCH
AUDITORIUM

a

An original musical recalling vaudeville and memorable
star performances of New York City 's famous Palace
Theater.
SAT. OCT. 8-8:30 p.m.
SUN. OCT. 9-2& 7 p.m.
Tickets at $5 and $3
Box office at Michigan Theater
Mon.-Fri. 10-5
or call 665-8221 or 761-2247. '

F

-. *:. *.* 4W . *. S..0.W ..V.'., ~ *:-..
'.';~

CINEMA II ANGELL HALL AUD. A
Sunday, October 2, 1977
Double Feature
Dark Victory
Director: EDMUND GOULDING (193
One of BETTE DAVIS' most deeply felt and widely-ranging performances
is as Judy Traherne, a superficial young heiress who suddently learns that
she has only months to live. As she realizes her remaining days mustibe
lived to the fullest, she gains a victory over death which few others ever
glimpse. With GEORGE BRENT, HUMPHREY BOGART, RONALD REAGAN,
and GERALDINE FITZGERALD.
7p.m. only $1.50
a *a** * *** **** **** * ***

4 l'OclC,
F- FOR 4
a~rn FRE. Fol;y am (oSPEL at
Pm I P . - F L

I

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