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September 23, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-09-23

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 23, 1977-Page 3
ANNOUNCES SCIENCE CONFERENCE:
China to undo work of radicals'

A)
MU SE IS PA EN CALL %-nIIY
Security deposit hassles
If you just got your security deposit back from the apartment you
rented in Ann Arbor this summer and the landlord made a few more
deductions than you think are justified, don't panic. City housing
regulations provide you with legal means.to challenge your landlord.
As a tenant, you may find a security deposit deduction for broken win-
dows, "miscellaneous damages," or a dirty oven. If you don't remem-
ber damaging anything, and particularly if you don't recall owning an
oven of any sort - dirty or clean - write a letter to your landlord im-
mediately. Your claim must be mailed within seven days to be effec-
tive. The next step is up to the landlord, who will decide whether or not
to challenge your claim to that money. Many landlords will drop the
whole issue and give the disputed portion of the deposit back to you.
That depends, of course, on the size of the deduction made. i you do
not gel your money back within 45 days, the law allows you to sue the
landlord for double the amount in question. The whole affair may
seem pretty complex if you're not a law school alumnus, so be sure to
call the Housing Law Reform Project at 763-3241 if you have any ques-
tions.
Happenings..
... begin with a noon luncheon at Guild House, 802 Monroe St.,
where Dave Bower will talk on the upcoming "hunger walk" in Ann
Arbor ... also at noon, the South African Liberation Committee will
hold a memorial service on the Diag for Steve Biko, the Black South
African leader who died last week ... Eclipse Jazz sponsors a free
workshop with musician Marion Brown at 2 p.m. in the RC Aud., East
Quad ...' for you enginering majors, Mr.,Hanauer will speak on "A
Probabilistic Approach To A Reactor Liscensing Program at 3:45 in
Chrysler Center, Rm. 165 ... The Ann Arbor Libertarian League will
present a taped lecture by Robert LeFerve entitled "Coming Alive," 8
p.m. at 1124 Nielson Ct.., Apt. 105 ... Miki Shima will speak on "Who-
listic Approaches to Health and Healing" at 8, Canterbury House, cor-
ner of Catherine and Division St. ... The 'U' folk dance club will be
dancing from 8-12' in the League ... and the Gay Community Services
Center will hold an open house at 612 Forest, Suite B, beginning at 8.
Refreshments will be served.
04
I was a teen-age Star War addict
Soon, no doubt, the Guinness Book of Records will establish a new
category for the most viewings of "Star Wars" by a single person. And
when the riew category is created, the winner will no doubt be 19-year-
old Matthew Miller of Wichita, Kan. Miller has watched the space epic
glitter before his orbs 100 times. That's 208 hours and 20 minutes of
star-gazing. "I like the movie," Miller says in an obvious understate-
ment. "I came the first day and came to all seven shows. After a while
I cut that back to five and now I'm down to only a couple at a time."
The theater which Miller patronizes is keeping tracy of his visits and
letting the film buff in for free. "I'm not aiming at a specific number
now," Miller adds. "At first I wanted; to try for 30 to break my old
record. (He saw the original "Airport" 27 times) But when I got there I
thought, 'What the hell, why not 100.' " Miller may have one trick that
gives him an edge over everyone else trying for that Guinness record.
He is unemployed.
"
On the outside...
Gloom. Despair. Sorrow. Let's put it this way: if you liked yes-
terday's weather, you're going to love today's. Skies will beshrouded
in clouds. Wfat is worse, showers and thundershowers will develop as
the day scrapes by. It won't pour either, like it does in all those grade
'B' horror flicks - it's just going to droozle on and off. Today's high
will be 70. Tonight's low is 56.

TOKYO (AP) - China announced
an upcoming national science confer-
ence yesterday and called on its
researchers to "strive to learn from
other countries" and to work quickly
to undo the technological "sabotage"
of the radical "Gang of Four" and
other fallen Communist leaders.
The Communist party central com-
mittee announcement also said China
would re-establish a state scientific
and technological commission, ap-
parently to coordinate scientific
work and economic development.

THE ANNOUNCEMENT was re-
ported by the official Hsinhua news
agency, monitored here.
Under party Chairman Hua Kuo-
feng, the Chinese have set them-
selves the goal of modernizing their
agriculture, industry; national de-
fense and science and technol-
ogy by the end of the century.
It said China aims by the year 2000
to electrify and automate extensive-
ly. "This will develop the productive
forces rapidly, radically alter the
appearance of China's economy and

Rhodesians suffering
fro wrpyhss

greatly strengthen her national de-
fense," it said.
"WE MUST have scientists and
technicians of the world's first
rank," it said. "We must have the
most advanced scientific research
facilities . . . great theoretical
creativity and technical inventive-
ness."
In the natural sciences, it said, "we
are comparatively backward. We
must strive to learn from other
countries. It is necessary to improve
the collection of scientific and techni-
cal information, promote interna-
tional academic exchance and intro-
duce necessary advanced t e c h-
niques."
China's scientific accomplishment
is seen in the successful testing of 'nu-
clear weapons and guided missiles
and the launching of manmade
satellites, the circular said, but the
country suffered from "a long period
of interference and sabotage" by
former President Liu Shao-chi, the
late Defense Minister Lin Piao, and
especially the radical Gang of Four,
led by Mao Tse-tung's widow, Chiang
Ching.
LIU AND LIN were purged in the

late 1960's, and the Gang of Four was
arrested last year and accused of
plotting against Hua.
The circular said the gang "denied
the role of science in promoting
production" and was responsible for
the destruction of laboratory equip-
ment, the closing of research institu-
tions and the suppression of intellec-
tuals.
The radicals were ideological pur-
ists opposed to the introduction of
'pragmatic' policies suggestive of
capitalism.
The circular said the gang opposed
learning from foreign technology
"and at. the same time strangled
efforts to createethings in China."
The committee document said
institutions disbanded because of
the Gang of Four's campaign must
be restored and scientists must be
given sufficient time, resources and
help in their work.
One of the intellectuals suppressed
in recent years was U.S.-educated
physicist Chou Pei-yuan, regarded as
the nation's leading scientist. Now
rehabilitated, he is expected to
emerge again as a top researcher.

SALISBURY, Rhodesia (AP)'-
Five years of guerrilla war have torn
huge holes in Rhodesia's social and
moral fabric.
War statistics tell only part of the
story: 5,700 lives lost on both sides in
the fighting between forces of the
white minority government and
black nationalists trying to over-
throw it.
BUT FAMILIES have been split by
divorce and emigration; the war has
spawned a record number of illegeti-
mate children, driven frightened
men and women to suicide and
caused sharp. increases in drug ad-
diction and drunkenness.
"Rhodesians have become prod-
ucts of a sick society that in turn has
been created by what we call war
psychosis," one sociologist stated.
The war has touched the lives of
most of the 270,000 whites as well as
most of the 6.4 million blacks.
HUNDREDS of thousands of
blacks have been herded from tradi-
tional homes into wire-fenced pro-
tected villages. Many black children
have fled the country to join the
guerrillas. Virtually all able-bodied
white, colored mixed race and Asian
men under 30 serve up to seven
months a year in the armed forces
under a draft.
Blacks, enlisting voluntarily, serve
as full time soldiers in the Rhodesian
army. They make up two-thirds of
the army.
The fear that faces part-time
soldiers 'in the bush and the loneliness
and anxiety of the wives, girlfriends
;and mothers ;they leave behind have
Combined to spin a new web of social
problems seldom known before.
DISTRESS telephone calls by
would-be suicides, mainly wives of
servicemen, to the Samaritans or-
ganization increased fourfold in the

last year.
"The majority are suffering from
the strain of having husbands in the
bush," a Samaritan official said.
"Jealousy on the part of fiancees or
the depression of loneliness and inse-
curity all cause these women strain."
A total of 371 whites committed4
suicide last year - 86 more than the
first year of the war, according to
official figures.
SOME SOLDIERS, to muster cour-
age for battle or to relax after-
wards, reach for drugs or alcohol,
and, to lift depression, so do theim
wives.
The 1976 annual report of the
Rhodesian police recorded increases
of 93.8 per cent in-drug offenses and
18.1 per cent involving liquor. The
report covered all races; it said the
increases were mostly among whites
blit it gave no specific figures.
"The war has provided an excuse
that didn't exist previously for people
to drink heavily without feeling too
guilty about it," a spokesperson for
Alcoholics Anonymous said. "Men
worry about their wives and turn to
drink. The wives fret about their
husbands and do so too."

Daily Official
Bulletin
Friday, September 23, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Alan Paton, U-M Flint, "Literary An-
alysis: Cry the Beloved Country," Fredrica K. Bar-
tz, Ph.D., Assoc Prof. English, U-M Flint, recounts
the critical aspects of Paton's novel, 10 a.m.
Guild House: Home-made soup & sandwich lunch-
eon, 50t, Dave Bower, Dir., Michigan CROPS talks
'about the Hunger Walk, planned for Oct. 2 and gives
info about The World Hunger Service, 802 Monroe,
fnoon.
Music School: Complete set, Beethoven Sonatas,
Part v, Maria Meirelles, pianist, Rackham Aud., 8
p.m.
WEATHER MAN
WASHINGTON (AP) - There's a
new factor in climate change, reports
,'National Geographic. For the first
time, say scientists, man and his
activities may be beginning 'to affect
the weather.
One expert, Dr. Reid A. Bryson, of
the University of Wisconsin, says
-,an may even be the decisive factor
ithe climate equation. He'calls the
over-all effect of man's activities
"the human volcano," citing his
smoke, tractor dust, jet exhaust and
smog.
Many scientific efforts are under
way to assess man's impact on the
climate. Whatever the studies show,
climatologists agree that man is a
new factor in the game of climate
change.

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THE MICH GAN DAILY
Volunge LxXXVIII, No. 14
Friday, September 23, 1977
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Pub-
lished daily Tuesday through Sunday morning dur-
ing the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Mchigan 48109. Subscription rates:
f$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
'mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
47.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
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