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September 17, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-17

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Page 2-Saturday, September17, 1977-The Michigan Daily
Church Worshc Services

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students.
ARGENTINE DAM
PROMOTES PROGRESS
BUENOS AIRES (AP) - The new
Ullum Dam in western Argentin ,
scheduled for completion in mid-197,
will open up the desert zone of San
Juan Province in the Andes foothills
to colonization and additional agri-
cultural farmland.
More than 60 per cent of the work
on Ullum Dam has been completed,'
and now work is starting on the 1,075-
acre park zone around the dam site.
In addition to adding to the
panorama from high above on Mount
Ullum, the dam will be used to
irrigate the arid region, enabling
people to settle on farms. This
government plan is designed to aid in
depopulating urban centers such as
Greater Buenos Aires, and to boost
the country's agriculture.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA )
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship-11:00 a.m.
Bible Study-"Revelation"-9:30
a.m.
* * *
Fellowship Supper-6:00 pm. ($1.25).
Program-"World Hunger"-7:00
p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.--Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
4:00 p.m.-Undergraduate Fellow-
ship and Dinner.
4:00 p.m.-Graduate and Young
Adult Picnic.
Tuesday:
3:30 p.m.-Discussion on Bonhoffer'S
"Cost of Discipleship."
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thomson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No.9
Saturday. September 17, 1977
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Pub-
lished daily Tuesday through Sunday morning dur-
ing the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

RUDRANANDA ASHRAM
is offering techniques in begin-
ning meditation and kundoline
yoga.
Monday-Wednesday 5 P.M.
640 Oxford 995-5463

I

CINEMA 11

ANGELL HALL
AUD. A

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
LOVE & DEA T H
This film is rich with the sounds of classical music and the
(distorted) images of Russian literature and ingmar Bergman.
Diane Keaton and Woody Allen clumsily masquerade them-
selves as Spanish nobility in a futile attempt to assassinate
Napoleon. A madcap adventure of outrageous humor.
7, 8:45;' *10 1 $1.50_
7'A

AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron-663-9376
Ronald E. Cary, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible School-11
a.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Morning Worship - "The
Foolishness of Faith."
6 p.m.-Evening Worship-Holy Com-
munion Service.'
Midweek Worship-12:10 p.m. and
10 p.m.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Sunday Eucharist at noon.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-10: 30 a. m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Liberty, 10-5
Monday-Saturday; closed Sundays.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 5. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west o'f U of M Stadium)
,Bible Study-Sunday 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00p.m.-
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.
UNIVERf l'Y UTLIERAN
CHAPEL M
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:30 and
10: 30 a~m.
Sunday Bible Study at 10:45.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, Ministers
10 a.m.-Morning Service.
5 p.m.-Informal Worship.
* * * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
First Baptist Church.
Bible Study-11a.m.
Fellowship Meeting Tuesday at 7:30
p m,
OPEN MEETING
TO SIGN UP FOR
AUDITIONS
For the Comic Opera Guild's
February production of
Orpheus in the
Underworld

Sunday, Sept. 18
7:30 p.m.
at ART WORLDS, 213'/2 S. Main St.

Senate: Did Lance hinderFIi es nlp o eO

P1

E A DQUART ERS-,
FOR YOUR 7;
L A NT A N D FL
N EEDS
21/ acres of greenhouse,
open to the public, in
which ---
We grow many of our
plants and flowers.
A Free People's PottingY
Bench
A Full Selection of Supplies and Gifts ,
An amazing selection of foliage
plants, cacti, succulents,
gesneriads, bromeliads
Dried Flowers, Books, Plant Furniture
Our own delivery service
Tefefloro and FTD for out of town
Plant Classes starting September 19
JUST ARRIVEDI
4 full selection of
Bulbs
imported from Holland

Making waves
These happy folks were assembled
by WIQB and New Dawning Water-
beds in an attempt to fit 50 souls on
an, aquatic mattress yesterday af-
ternoon on Liberty St. No word yet
whether they shattered the Guin-
ness Record.

(Continued from Page 1)
Lance-run First National Bank of
Calhoun, Ga., was "an asset for a
candidate like the goose that lays a
golden egg.".
After a second full day of grilling
the budget director, the committee
adjourned its public session until a
rare Saturday hearing.
MATHIAS ALLEDGED the over-
drafts constituted a political loan by
the bank to Lance, its president, in
violation of federal banking laws. He
said a federal banking investigator,
John Sherry, had considered them a
violation in a 1975 report.
But Lance noted the Department of
Justice already had'considered the
matter and declined to prosecute. He
also said it was an old issue that the
Senate Government Operations Com-
mittee had considered at the original
confirmation hearings in January for
Lance's appointment as director of
the Office of Management and
Budget.
The committee, now known as the
Governmental Affairs Committee, is
conducting new hearings into
Lance's financial problems. In addi-
tion to Lance, an issue before the
committee is whether it failed to con-
duct adequate confirmation hearings
for Lance in the first place.
PRESIDENT CARTER, meanwhile,
told a group of journalists he still has
an open mind on Lance, but he ap-
peared pleased by the way the hear-
ings had gone so far. "Now that he
has answered those charges - I hope
and believe successfully - I think he
has certainly enhanced his position."
Lance said that with respect to the
campaign overdrafts, the responsi-
bility for check writing rested with
his campaign committee while he
was actively engaged in vote-seek-
ing. But he did not deny that being
able to write overdrafts may have
given him an advantage.
Lance did flatly deny allegations
by Mathias that he had delayed on
one or more occasions to sign the
papers that gave the FBI permission',
to investigate his background and

Overdrafts common
at Lance 's old bank

determine his fitness for the OMB
post after Carter nominated him.
APPEARING RUFFLED for the
first time in the two days of hearings,
Lance said, "Nobody ever told me
there was any difficulty at all in get-
ting any sort of paper signed by me."
"As soon as it was put before me I
signed it ... I have nothing to be as-
hamed of, nothing to hide, I didn't
fear any sort of FBI investigation,"
Lance said.
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D-Conn.)
accused Lance of breaking a promise
to halt overdrafts by bank officers.
RIBICOFF, CHAIRMAN of the com-
,mittee, released a letter Lance wrote
to Joseph Ream, Atlanta regional

comptroller, on Oct. 25, 1973.
The letter states that the manage-
ment of the Calhoun First National
Bank "has been instructed to take
immediate action to cure overdrafts
of directors, officers, employees and
members of their families."
However, Ribicoff said the over-
drafts more than doubled until Lance
and his relatives were overdrawn by
as much as $450,000 in mid-1975.
Lance replied there was no loss to
the bank and that the overdrafts
were not criticized in a subsequent
comptroller's report in 1974.
Lance also explained tok the cm-
mittee that the ,Calhoun bank had
permitted overdrafts for personal
accounts because ank officers knew
everyone in town and theyalsc

"
"

ATLANTA (AP) - Residents of
Bert Lance's hometown this, week
confirmed the federal budget direc-
tor's testimony before a Senate
committee that it was common prac-
tice for Calhoun First National Bank
to allow overdrafts on customers'
accounts.
"This is true. The Calhoun bank at
one time had a very liberal policy on
overdraft," said Calhoun pharmacist
Jack Mullins. "I myself was once
overdrawn $10,000 to $12,000. They
have allowed overdrafts to people
who they have deemed worthy."
LANCE TESTIFIED before the
Senate Governmental Affairs Com-
mittee that overdrafts were accepted
practice in a rural bank where the
bank personnel knew the customers.
The Rev. Emory Brackman of the
First Methodist Church, to which
Lance belongs, said he had talked
with a number of Calhoun business-
men, "and they admitted that be-
cause of their good standing or repu-
tations, they at times had $4,000 to
$5,000 overdrafts, which in a few days
or weeks they would take care of."
Lance, director of the Office of
Management and Budget, personally
ran up overdrafts of as much as
$26,000, while his wife and eight
relatives ran up a total of $450,000 at
one time.
LANCE TOLD the Senate commit-
tee, which is examining allegations
of financial improprieties against

Lance before he was appointed
budget director, that the Calhoun
bank's overdraft policy was applied
to all customers and the bank suf-
fered only minor losses from the
policy.
The pi'actice was stopped after it
wa* criticized by bank examiners.
"There is a lot of difference
between New York and Chicago and
a town of 5,000 like Calhoun," said
pharmacist Mullins. "The bank knew
and knows each person they are
dealing with. We're not numbers.
What he said was totally true."
JOHN HOUSER, a Calhoun busi-
nessman, said the town's bank "just
a few years ago was still operating in
a country way. Everyone knew
everyone else.
"If a businessman becomes over-
drawn and he is a reasonably good
customer, they'll call him up and tell
him. I don't want to give the im-
pression that we're getting free loans
or anything; you had to pay, but they
didn't bounce your checks immedi-
ately."
Brackman and Calhoun Mayor
Billy Burdette said they were among
the bank's customers who built up
overdrafts.
"I don't think this is a widespread
common thing," Brackman said. "I
would not say there was a continuous
flood of overdrafts across the city.
But most businessmen probably have
had overdrafts."

"
-"
11

CHARING CROSS
BOOK SHOP
316. State St.-Ann Arbor
Used, Out-of-Print and Rare Books
Bought and Sold
Antique Maps and Prints

FREE Your choice of a plant
or a Sweetheart Rose
on presentation of this coupon
good thru Sept. 30, 1977 1 per customer .
. w . w1021

Book Searches

Appraisals

Tel. 994-4041
And in the Back of the Shop ..

ANAARBOR FILM CO-OP
Saturday, September 11
THE WILD ONE
(Laslo Benedek, 1954) 7 ONLY-MLB 3
BRANDO portrayed the biker anti-hero with outward bravado and inner hurt as he made the black
leather jacket a symbol Originally banned from many towns for fear it would cause juvenile
delinquent riots, it is one of those films that seemed to speak for a generation and olandmark
in Brando's brilliant career. 'Bold and strong a. , picture of extraordinary candor and
courage "N.Y. TIMES LEE MARVIN. Plus Short JAMMIN' THE BLUES (Gion Mili, 1944) Academy
Award-winning jazz jam session. including Lester Young, Sidney Catlett, Harry Edison, Barney
Kessel.Jo Jones.Illinois Joquet
AWI U W mm urI a =N A m t -" ! a __A 1 ...-

A PERIODICAL RETREAT
featuring

I

w IF7I " - k IV

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