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September 17, 1977 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Big

Blue

ootball

special inside!

POWELL'S
PREDICAMENT
See Editorial Page

c I J
I/ ht

Sict 43u

aiIt1

STICKY
High-77
Low - 58
See Today, Page 3

Vol. LXXXVIII, No.*9

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Saturday, September 17, 1977

Ten Cents

10 Pages plus Supplement

Footballfans
Bugles, bann

By PATTY MON

'But if the six-pack is dis-
creetly wrapped in a brown
bag, it's okay , . .

Twelve-pack toters, bugle
ers and football fanciers, bew
Gate attendants aren'ts
ticket at today's Michigan-D
ging anything larger than a
nine to unfurl a twenty-foot m
AS PART OF A NEW POL
and designed "to crack dow
coming into the stadium," A
tor Charles Harris warns tha
a one-quart thermos bottle o
won't make it past the gate.
Neither will portable bar
backpacks. And if you don't b
posted today around the stadi
University is serious about
clutter.

ace the blues:
rsbeer taboo
ITEMURRISince alcohol is prohibited in the stadium, fans
shouldn't bring in a Stroh's six-pack anyway, let
-blowers, banner boost- alone the bulky twelve-pack.
are!
supposed to take your BUT IF THE SIX-PACK is discreetly wrapped in a
uke game if you're lug- brown paper bag, it's okay. "We don't get involved in
six-pack cooler or plan- the business of searching," explained Harris.
essage to Mom. With crowds of 100,000 expected to cheer at every
.ICY adopted last spring Wolverine home game, stadium officials are con-
vn on the size of items cerned that every fan "have a seat, that their legs
ssistant Athletic Direc- aren't rubbing against some cooler and they can get
t "anything in excess of through the aisles," according to Harris.
r larger than 12x12x14" Customer complaints about cramped seating led
to the new policy.
rs, banners, horns and Fans will have to see for themselves how string-
believe Harris, the signs ently the ban is enforced. Gate attendants are also ob-
um will confirm that the liged to ask for student identification for entry with a
curtailing spectators' student ticket, but most folks know they seldom do.
Ask any scalper.

GATS
3

law

Lance

questioned

on

FBI

probe

5

Eagleton
defends
OMB head
WASHINGTON (AP) - Budget
Director Bert Lance ran into tough
questioning from a Senate panel
yesterday over whether he delayed a
routine FBI probe, into his past and
whether bank overdrafts during his
1974 gubernatorial campaign gave
him an unfair advantage.
But he also picked up some vocal
support as Sen. Thomas Eagleton
(D-Mo.) claimed that Lance was
being smeared by the same broad
brush used so effectively by the late
Sen. Joseph McCarthy.
"An the 1950s. we had guilt by asso-
ciation," Eagleton said. "Sen. Mc-
Carthy made it into a fine art. In 1977,
we have guilt by accumulation."
McCARTHY, a Wisconsin Republi-
can, made headlines during the 1950s
with largely unsubstantiated accusa-
tions of widespread Communist infil-
tration in the United States.
Some of the harshest questioning of
Lance came from Sen. Charles
Mathias (R-Md.) who claimed the
ability of Lance's campaign commit-
tee to write overdrafts on the
See SENATE, Page 2

.. .1 have noth-
ing to be ashamed

0J, nothing
hide . .

to

-B'ert Lance

MEDICAL MA TTERS ON AGENDA:
Re ents o ka
St. Joe dea

The point of the matter ...
... is that Scott Trepod (left) and Gary Pash aren't dueling on Diag, but demonstrating their "on guard" techniques in
an open-air battle. The rivals are members of the University Fencing Club.

South African
Visitor scorns force
for political change

blasts apartheid

By DAVID GOODMAN
When Louwrens Pretorius arrived
on campus Wednesday, he found
himself the center of a controversy
which had sharply divided the Inter-
national Center and she African Stu-
dents Association.
Pretorius is a political science lec-
turer at the University of South Afri-
ca in Pretoria. touring the U.S. under
the federal government's Interna-
tional Visitors Program.
WHEN AFRICAN-students learned
Pretorius was coming to the Univer-
sity and that the International Center
was coordinating the visit, they were
furious. They demanded assurances
that he was not a supporter of apart-
heid - South Africa's policy of racial
segregation and white domination.
African Student Association lead-

"THE BASIC POSITION of the
party is there should be no discrim-
ination on the basis of race in all
areas of life. That means one man,
one vote," he explained. "What the
PRP is trying to do is call for the
"politics of negotiation."
"It's time, if not past time, that
white and black leaders get together
and work out a solution. There's no
way white leaders can continue to
work out 'blue prints,' "he added.
The PRP holds 19 seats in the
170-member South African parlia-
ment - not enough to influence gov-
ernment policy.
"I don't see much hope of change
happening in South Africa through
the electoral process among.whites,"
Pretorius said.
INSTEAD, PRETORIUS believes

By BRIAN BLANCHARD
and PATTY MONTEMURRI
Business didn't range far from the
health field at yesterday's Regents'
meeting as board members unanimous-
ly approved a new health program, the
construction of a new medical library
and the purchase of St. Joseph Mercy
Hospital.I
It doesn't have a specific purpose yet,
but the St. Joseph Hospital property, on
the corner of Catherine and Ingalls, is
being studied by University Hospital
administrators. The University is hur-
rying to create enough options to justify
the six-million-dollar bill it will send to
the state legislature in October.
The Regents discussed methods for
clearing a financial path through the
tangle of mortgage and budgets at-
tached to the purchase. St. Joseph has a
two-and-a-half-million-dollar mortgage
that the Regents will accept with the
building.
Later, the group breathed life into a
new office to consolidate health care
programs between University Hos-
pital and the Medical School. In what
President Robben Fleming called a
"distinctly plus move," 370 students in
health studies outside the professional
health schools will now find their ac-
tivities under the "administrative;
fiscal, and programmatic" influence of
a new position and committee.
The Regents also approved the
schedule, described by Chief Financial
Officer James Brinkerhoff, to begin
construction of a new medical library
at the beginning of nett year. The
structure, on Catherine Street, will cost

from legal costs in a court battle this
year.
Governmental immunity granted by
the state to government agencies "sim-
ply means there can be no malpractice
suit against the University; the in-
dividual doctor can still be sued,"
stressed Fleming.
See MEDICAL, Page 3
0 l
to study.
SAfrican
holdingfs,
By MICHAEL YELLIN
Regent Thomas Roach -(D-Detroit)
said yesterday he expects the Uni-
versity to hold a forum this fall on the
future of its $40 million investment in
firms with ties to South Africa. Two
other Regents said they wanted to
examine the University's South Afri-
can investment policy.
Their statements to the Daily came
two days after,a unanimous decision
by the University of Massachusetts
trustees to sell all that university's
stock in corporations doing business
with South Africa - a move to pro-
test the government's policy of racial
segregation.

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asM

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