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September 11, 1977 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1977-09-11

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Page 2-Wednesday, September 14, 1977-The Michigan Daily
6

THE FOLKS EXPECT YOU TO

Young to face Browne
for Detroit mayor's seat

WRITE HOME ONCE IN A WHILE ..

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(Continued from Page 1)
bring about healing in Detroit.
Together with God's help we can unify,
this city."
the two white candidates had con-
ceded second place to Browne just two-
and-a-half hours after the polls closed
at 8 p.m.
Browne and Young now face each other
in the Nov. 8 general election, the first
mayoral contest in Detroit to 'pit black
against blaek.
Drizzling rains had soured earlier
predictions of a heavy turnout in the
primary.
BY THE time the polls closed, only

31 per cent of the city's electorate
had cast their ballots in the non-
partisan race. 203,400 of Detroit's
639,980 went to the polls, down from
the turnout of four years ago when
247,266 persons voted.
Election officials had earlier pre-
dicted a 40 to 45 per cent turnout in
the election, where voters also
selected candidates for city council
and voted on a crucial school millage
proposal
City Clerk James Bradley had little
to say about the low turnout except to
agree, "It's the rain" that kept most
voters away.
IN A glimpse of things to come,
incumbent mayor and primary vic-

The harvest they reaped
this year was rather grim.
Poverty and hunger and ig-
norance seem to be their
major commodity.
There must be some-
thing we can do to correct this
balance of payment. And
there is something. Some-
thing called the Peace Corps.
It'll never save the world.
That's an illusion better left at
home. But a small piece, just
a tiny piece, that's been done
before. 2,000 wells in the
drought stricken Sahel. Grain
losses cut from 33% to 3%.
Those are no miracles, but it's
progress.
Peace Corps volunteers
are people who won't allow
the world to go gently into
that dark night. No, they'd
rather rage toward the light.
But what can they possibly

get from that? The rewards,
they're just too many to
count. A language, a cultural
exchange, a mutual giving of
knowledge. Of course there's
all those and more. But how
do you measure pride? And
what's satisfaction bringing
on the open market? And
happiness, that ought to be
worth something.
Ask any Peace Corps
worker who they did the most
favors for. The answers seem
to come back pretty much the
same all the time. Himself.
Herself. They got back much
more than they gave.
The Peace Corps is
alive and well. Call toll
free: 800-424-8580. Or
write the Peace Corps,
Box A,
Washington,
D.C. 20525. C j

Hush liftle baby
don't you cry.
If someone doesn't
do something,
you'll just die.

tor Young immediately began lash-
ing out at second-place finisher
Browne before the votes were. all
counted.
Approaching his enthusiastic sup-
porters with the thumbs-up victory
sign and a hearty "good evening,"
Young continued what has been all
along a hard and bitter campaign.
"We started off with ten candidates
running for mayor," Young told his
supporters. "They were distorting
the facts, and lying. Now there's only
one.
"He's (Browne) still playing catch-
up. He's still running hard. He's still
distorting the facts. He's still lying."
Young said, "With your help he'll
still be lying and running on Novem-
Young promised to run on his
record, and deal with "Issues and
facts" not "personality."
Asked if he expected a Browne
challenge in November, or if he was
hoping to face Dailey or Mogk,.
Young said, "I didn't give a goddamn
who the hell it was going to be."
Block
case goes
before
arbitrator
(Continued from Page 1)
warrant ordering him to produce a
voice print to be matched against a
recording of the alleged threat. Block
has refused to make the print.
ANN ARBOR POLICE handed the
order down in April, and early last
summer Block went before Judge
S.J. Elden (15th district court) and
presented a motion to quash the
order. Elden, however, upheld the
order and Block is now appealing the
decision to the circuit court.
"(But) the court decision is not the
only thing we're looking at," Lem-
mer added.
,Lemmer did not elaborate on other
phases of the investigation.
Block said the union's position at
yesterday's hearing was that h1
should be fully reinstated andthat,
"the Univesity has had enough
opportunity to present any evi
dence."
Dwight Newman, president of the
local, commented, "There have been
no charges. There have been only
assumptions."
In addition, Washington contends
the University is not even conducting
an investigation.
"AS FAR AS I can see, there's no
University investigation," he stated.
"We have interviewed almost every
witness who has anything to do with
the case, and none of those people
have been talked to by the University
or the police."
Both parties in the dispute now
have two weeks to submit briefs to
the arbitrator explaining their posi-
tions on his jurisdiction. Walt will
decide in approximately one month
whether he does in fact have author-
ity to make a ruling in the case.
If Walt decides to arbitrate the
case, he may hold another hearing
where the merits of the case would be
argued. However, he could make a
decisionswithout hearing further
arguments.
In any case, the jointly-appointed
arbitrator's decision would be bind-
ing.

Walt, a Southfield attorney, was
unavailable for comment after yes=
terday's hearing.

SORORITIES
A
SPECTRUM
OF EXPERIENCES
registration 9-14-21
in th hf ishbowl4
or c all 663-4505

MASS

MEETING SEPTEMBER 21
7:30 in the fishbowl

ASS /MEETING
7:0 0pDMSept. 15
Pendeiton Room.
2nd fl. Mich. Union
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