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September 11, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A

- *
Drop in before the rush
Scoop! Hot Copy! Hold the Presses! Put 'er to bed, boys! Now you
haye a chance to get into the glamourous and high-paying (well,
glamorous at least) fielf of journalism. Just beat a path to our door at
420 Maynard St. (next to Student Activities Building) whre hard-core
Daily-ites will tell you what it's like to get high on news. If your week is
full, be on hand to huddle with the masses at a mass meetingMonday,
Sept 9; also at the hallowed stone and plaster halls of the Daily.
*
Disgruntled tenants to arms!
Since m ost of you either rent from a management companyor
live in University residence halls, you're probably well aware that
Am Arbor housing is nothing like home. Quite often, tenants complain
about the condition of their homes, sky high rent payments and con-
ditions of overcrowding which are found-well-just about
everywhere within a mile from campus. Perhaps, then, you should
consider dropping by the first mass meeting of the Ann Arbor Tenants
Union (TU), the group committed to fighting Ann Arbor's housing
crisis. At the gathering, you'll be able to consort with other local
residents who wish to defend their rights as tenants in a town where
tenants often get the short end of the stick. The meeting will be held in
the TU's offices on the fourth floor of the Michigan Union, Monday
night at.Membership in the Tenants Union is open to all city tenants,
stugentsaiid non-students, dorm residents or non-dorm residents.
Happenings"..
Yor're pretty much on your own today. Hit a Local Motion "Street
party" from 1 to 6 p.m. today on Arch Street )near the Packard and
State Street intersection) and fill your tummy while gettin down with
entertainment by Madcat Ruth, Headwind and Jazztet. Proceeds from
the benefit will go to enlargement of the People's Food Co-op ... At
7:30 p.m., Guild House offers you a movie about I.F. Stone's periodical
and refreshments too. . . Garnish those hideous dorm and apartment
rooms with Monet, Cezanne, Picasso, Renoir, and, if you're really
daring, some Escher as well. The art print sale, a benefit for Child
Care Action Center, will begin tomorrow and end Friday in both
Michigan Union Lobby and the Fishbowl. Sponsored by the Mad Hat-
ter's Tea Party, the prints go for $2.50 each or 3 for $6.00.. . . For
some heavy activity on Monday, drop by the Southern Africa
Liberation Committee meeting at 7:30 p.m. in East Quad, Rm. 126, to
prepare for actions aimed at cutting the University's investments in
South Africa. Featured film will be "Last Grave at Dimbaza". Free
. That's all, folks.
It'll be a beautiful day to end the tem's first weekend. Bask under"
a clear sky and bright sun, with the high temperature nudging a very
comfortable, autumn-like 67 degrees. Enjoy it.

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 11 1977-Page 3
Graham's Iron Curtain tour: A first

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP - Billy
Graham, convinced that, religion can
survive in a socialist country, ended a
bridge-building visit to the Soviet bloc
yesterday after preaching evangelism
to an estimated 28,000 persons.
Although Graham has drawn bigger
crowds on a single night in his U.S. cru-
sades, Western'observers described the
week-long trip here as "unprecedent-
ed" in postwar Eastern Europe. It was
Graham's first visit to a Moscow-line
Communist nation.
THE 58-YEAR-OLD North Carolinian
arrived in Hungary last Saturday at the
invitation of ~ the Council of Free
Churches in Budapest, Debrecen and
Pecs and a fifth at an outdoor rally
that his hosts said was the largest Prot-
estant gathering since the Communists
came to power in the late 1940s.
Graham said he came to this mostly
Roman Catholic nation for five reasons
- to preach the Gospel, meet church
leaders, observe a socialist society and
how the church functions within it, and
"help build bridges among peoples."
"All five of my reasons for coming
have been more than fulfilled," said the
preacher, whose strenuous schedule
apparently triggered a mild recurrence
of phlebitis.
"I HAVE NOT joined the Communist

party since coming to Hungary nor
have I been asked to," Graham told a
news conference Friday. "But I think
the world is changing and we're, on
both sides, beginning to understand
each other more."
He said his visit had "taught me
many things" about life in Communist
countries. "People can come to church
and worship God."
Hoping the trip might pave the way
for further visits in the Soviet bloc,
Graham said he probably would accept
any invitations formally extended by
church groups in the region.
"I AM INTENSELY interested in this
part of the world," he said. "And I hope
this visit will not be my last."
Except for police directing traffic,
there was no sign of Hungarian authori-
ties at Graham's appearances. The
government has begun a campaign of
reconciliation with the church, but the
Communist party still forbids its 750,000
members to engage in religious activi-
ty.
Western observers said they were
surprised by the large turnout for
Graham's sermons and by the freedom
the government gave Graham to move
and preach throughout the country.
"THEY'RE CONSCIOUS of the West-
ern press attention and their image,"

one Westerner said. "Now they will be
able to go to Belgrade and say 'Look,
we have freedom of religion. We let Bil-
ly Graham preach.' "
The United States, Canada and all
European nations except Albania will
meet in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in Octo-
ber to review the implementation of the
1975 Helsinki agreements, which called
for a freer exchange of people and ideas
between East and West.
The Rev. Sandor Palotoy, president
of the Council of Free Churches, esti-
mated that Graham preached to a total
of 28,000 people, including 15,000 at last
Sunday's opening rally in Tahi, some
20 miles north of Budapest. Crowd
estimates from non-churchmen were
lower.
Describing his message as "the same
one I've preached on every continent,"
Graham called on his audiences to com-
mit themselves to Christ. He avoided
sensitive East-West issues or theologi-
cal disputes.

At each appearance, he asked .for
show of hands by those committini
theniselves to Christ. Each time almos
the entire congregation raised thei
hands.
Join The,
Daily Staff
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXVIII, No.4
Sunday, September11, 1977
is edited and managed by students at the Universit
of Michigan. News phone 764-(562. Second clas
postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Pul
lished daily Tuesday through Sunday morning du
ing the University year at 420 Maynard Stree
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13b
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satui
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Gang rivalry shatters
charms of Chinatown

#K
k 'K
UACMUSKET'S
MASS MEETING: SEPT. 14--7 p.m.
* for all crews and actors
AUDITIONS: SetUI16-7
* and Sept. 17-9 a.m.
* ~Pendleton Room, Mich igan Union
for further, information
* calf 763-11707
K 'K++++++++++++++++++++++++

SAN FRANCISCO (AP - Beneath
the porcelain charm of Chinatown that
tourists adore, a grim war is being
waged by armed youths, some barely
in their teens.
The gangs' violence and bloodshed
moved above ground last Sunday when
five innocent pesons were killed and 11
wounded in a hail of bullets at the
Golden Dragon restaurant.
CHINATOWN is the largest Oriental
community outside of Asia and the cur-
rent battle, waged fortjobs in gambling
houses, extortion rights and booty
began in 1969 when the first known vic-
tim was claimed.
Since then, 43, including the innocents
of the Sept. 4 slaughter, have died.
Gang activity is disrupting much of
Chinatown's commerce, as "very many
of the businesses there" have become
extortion victims, according to police

Lt. Daniel Murphy.
"THE YOUTH GANGS' criminal ac-
tivities range from entering theaters
without paying, extortion of meals from
restaurants and goods from merchants,
street and business robberies, to as-
sault and murder," according to a po-
lice department report released in the
wake of the Golden Dragon massacre.
According to police, two gangs, the
Wah Chings and Chung Ching Yee (Joe-
Boys\ are the two major factions in Chi-
natown's underworld. But there are
several offshoot groups and experts
guess there may be as many as 200
gang members.
The two gangs were formerly affilia-
ted, but are now rivals.
"It is this bitter rivalry and struggle
for control of criminal gang activities in
Chinatown that is at the heart of the
gang-related killings," a police spokes-
person said.

FREE SEMINAR
Introduction to
Photography
Mon.Sept._ 12~
_ 7:30pm
complete photographic process
demonstration studio will be
brightly lit with special sodium
lamps so each step Is totally
visible

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