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April 16, 1978 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-16

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State primary races packed

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April 16, 1978-Page9

(Continued from Page )
retirement announcement and re-
entered the Senatorial race.
Griffin's change of heart was im-
mediately dubbed "The Saint Valen-
tine's Day Massacre," for both the
timeliness of the announcement and for
the number of political deaths it en-
tailed for Republican candidates
hoping to succeed Griffin to the Senate.
THE FIRST TO fall was Lieutenant
Governor James Dammon, who silently
withdrew his ;own candidacy rather
than face the favored incumbent. U.S.
Congressman Philip Ruppe, a personal
friend of Griffin's, also withdrew, but
not before delivering a stinging indic-
tment on his own party for what he
called their fear to bring fresh faces to
the voters.
Volatile Oakland County Prosecutor
L. Brookes Patterson leveled a similar
attack on what he called Republican
party "bossism." But unlike Ruppe,
Patterson vowed to stay in the area and
challenge Griffin for the nomination.
Now Patterson and Griffin are the
only two candidates vying for the
Republican nomination, and their
primary fight promises may be a long
and bitter one.
Griffin has the support of the
Republican party leadership. Patter-
son, who calls himself the "maverick,"
has built a following in Oakland County
and the Southeast Michigan suburbs
from his staunch stands on crime, and
his advocacy of stricter sentencing for
less parole. Griffin has the advantage
of incumbency. Patterson has the ad-
vantage of his "populist" image, a lone-
citizen-politician railing against the
powers that be.
GRIFFIN MUST shake off the label
of being a tired old politician who will
Taxpayers
will
withhold
'war' tax
By LEONARD BERNSTEIN
About 60 people gathered at the Ann
Arbor Federal Building on Liberty
yesterday to announce their refusal to
pay the one-half of their taxes which
they claim goes to the United States
military.
"We resist taxes because we don't
believe in killing and we don't believe in
getting ready for killing," said Ypsilan-
ti resident Bruce Graves as he filed his
return.
THE PURPOSE of the demonstration
was to let people know that there's a lot
of people interested in expressing con-
cern about the military budget, accor-
ding to Graves.
Several other protestors mentioned
another concern. Military spending
"reduces employment," said Joe Volk,
"because it is a capital intensive in-
dustry. No goods or services are
created and so no people are hired to
run them," Volk explained.
Volk said if the same amount of
money were spent on domestic
programs. far more jobs would be
created.
THE 50 PERCENT figure is an ap-
proximation that they feel covers
Department of Defense expenditures,
nuclear research,. interest on the
national debt and other military costs.
Also targeted by the demonstrators is
the phone tax which was passed
specifically to fund the Vietnam War,
according to Professor Johan Eliot of
the School of Public Health, who is

refusing to pay the tax. Though the tax
decreases one percent annually, it must
be paid until 1981. "The tax is a source
of embarrassment to everybody," said
Eliot.
The group has adopted various
strategies to resist paying taxes.
Resistors claim a war tax credit or war
tax deduction and explain this on the
form, said organizer Wladyslaw
Narowski. Others refuse to file a return
or claim extra dependents.
Regardless of the approach adopted,
tax resistors face government action to
recover the taxes. Garnishing of wages
and taking the money from bank ac-
counts are common practices. Less
common are seizure of property and
arrest of the individual. But the cost of
acquiring the unpaid tax is often
prohibitive, Eliot said.
NAT'L DETAL 4ORD
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There IS a differ'ence!!?

retire before his term is out, and for
that he may be forced to justify his
premature retirement decision along
the way.
Governor Milliken has also kept a
semi-low profile in his re-election cam-
paign, banking on his incumbency to
make some political noise and news for
him.
Milliken will base his campaign on
his past political record-which has
seen its ups and downs. The PBB issue,
Plymouth Center, and the Seafarer
problems will almost certainly be
issues for debate this fall. Milliken will
keep his business-as-usual theme,
which has given him a nine-year stay so
far.
ZOLTON FERENCY brings ex-
perience as well as alternative political
views to the field. The Michigan State
University criminal justice professor
has already made three unsuccessful
attempts for the governor's seat, first
as a Democrat and later as a Human
Rights Party (HRP) candidate.

Ferency rejoined the Democrats last
yar, saying the HRP had lost its
viability as a party. Ferency is still
trying to sell his socialist ideology to the
st'hte's conservative constituency and
jokes of his past political ventures.
"I announced my candidacy in April
1966;" Ferency said at a recent can-
didate debate. "And I've been running
ever since."
State Senator Pat McCollough
(Dearborn) is the conservative ex-
tremist of the Democratic flock. Mc-
Collough is the most polished of the
candidates, usually dressed in a three-
piece suit.
"I DON'T SEE any great evil in the
word corporation," McCollough says.
"Let's recognize that we are in com-
petion with the southern states."
State Senator William Fitzgerald
(Detroit) is the best financed and har-
dest-talking of the candidates, calling
for more "energetic management" to
deal with social problems of unem-

ployment and to increase the state's
revenue. ,
"We have to put our house in order to
stimulate business," Fitzgerald says,
"because businesses do help pay our
social bills."
Bill Ralls, former Public Service
Commissioner, is the least experienced
of the Democratic candidates, having
never run for elective office before. But
Ralls says his inexperience should help
him, because he has no "partisan
alliances or political enemies."
Students who intend to be out of the
state or country for the August 8
primary can pick up their Absentee
Voters Ballot from the city clerk's of-
fice at City Hall. The ballot will be ac-
cepted starting on May 23.
The hurricane season runs from
the start of June through the end of
November, according to the National
Weather Service.

nn o

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INTERESTED IN BECOMING
A CAMPAIGN NEWS SECRETARY?
YOU MAY BE JUST WHAT THE
REPUBLICAN PARTY IS LOOKING FOR
The National Republican Congressional Committee
is looking for bright, aggressive people with a background
in communications and an interest in politics.
We are holding two training seminars in Washington,
D.C. with the hope of placing news secretaries with 1978
Republican Congressional campaigns. The two seminars
will be identical in content.
April 21, 22, 23 pr May 12, 13, 14
Write or call today for more information and an application form:
National Republican Congressional Committee
News Secretaries' Workshop
Room 512 - 300 New Jersey Avenue SE
Washington, D.C. 20515
202/225-1800

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Here's the deal. You come to
one or the other of the work-
shops. If you do well, we'll try
to place you in a G.O.P. cam-
paign somewhere in the
country.There are lots of
openings for trained people.
And the potential for even
more important assignments
in the future.

And here are the details.
There's a $25 registration fee
to keep out the non-serious.
Meals and materials are on
us. You pay to get to D.C. and
for your lodging. You have to
stay at the workshop hotel.

1

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DEL IVER

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