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April 16, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Sunday, April 16, 1978-The Michigan Daily

j

Three student filmmakers
document Nazi bookstore

MINORITY DISPLACEMENT AT THE
BIG TEN UNIVERSITIES:

By ANIDA ROSSMAN
and STEVE SHAER
- Though the Nazi party headquarters
on Vernon Highway in Detroit is no
longer in business, three University
students have preserved its memory by
gathering more than five hours of film
as part of a class project.
F The students refused to be identified
and the names used in this story are fic-
titious.
"THE LINE WE took was strictly ob-
jective, not sensationalism," said Dave
who worked on the film.
Last Wednesday about 15 policemen
were on hand as court bailaiffs issued
In 1975, New Mexico had a per capita
income of $6,4603, then the sixth highest
in the nation.

an eviction notice to the National
Socialist group at the headquarters. A
Common Pleas Court Judge last month
ordered the group to vacate the
premises which it had occupied since
last December.
"These are rational thinking people,
we want to show that," said Debbie.
EMPHASIZING THAT the Nazi
movement is not to be taken lightly
Debbie said, "They aren't just a bunch
of assholes, they have a structural
ideology in the United States and it is
possible that in 20 years under the right
economic conditions these people couild
come to power."
At a private screening of parts of the
film, an interview with a Nazi
spokesman was the focal point. The
ideology of the National Socialist
movement was the primary topic.
An example of the anti-Jewish ideas
expressed by the spokesman was the
continual reference to the three percent
Jewish population in the country in
financial and political control. Nelson
Rockefeller, the spokesman said, is

"considered a Jew by the Jewish
people."
THE FILM WAS laden with anti-
black comments also. "Blacks would
nbt be able to survive without the
whites supporting them. They would
probably eat each other if we let them
on their own," the spokesman said.
He also said that "blacks are intellec-
tually inferior to whites because their
brains weigh seven ounces less."
Bill Russell, captain of the Nazis in
Detroit, was reached prior to the evic-
tion and said confidently, "We'll be
here another three years," not
believing that the eviction order would
be carried out.
IN THE FILM the Nazi spokesman
said if they did happen to be forced out
of the headquarters they would relocate
in Detroit in a matter of days.
The thre filmmakers will edit their
five hours of film down to 30 minutes,
and plan to show it next Wednesday (if
not, Thursday) at 7 p.m. in room 2501,
C.C. Little Building. The public is in-
vited.

MICHIGAN..........................
University of
Michigan (Ann Arbor) ..................
Michigan State
University ...............................
TNDIAN .........................
Indiana University ......................
Purdue ......... .....................
ILLINOIS ...............................
University of Illinois
(Champaign-Urbana) ................ .
Northwestern
University ....................... ........
WISCONSIN......................
University of
Wisconsin (Madison) ....................
MINNESOTA ..........................
University of Minnesota
(Minneapolis-St. Paul)...................
OHIO ...................................
Ohio State
University ..............................
IOW A ..................................
University of Iowa .......................

Native
American
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1 .
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.6
0.7
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.3

Black
11.2
6.9
5.8
6.9
4.8
3.6
12.8
3.9
9.8
3.0
2.3
0.9
2.4
8.5
6.3
1. 2
2.6

Asian-
American
0.2 8,75,08
1.4
0.5
0.2
0.6
0.5
0.4
1.6
1.7
0.1
0.6
.0.2
1.4
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.3

Hispanic
1.7
1:l
0.5
2.2
0.7
0.6
3.5
0.8
1.2
1.4
0.7
1.0
0.7
1.2
0.3
0.7
0.6

White
88.2
86.9
92.3
92.8
92.8
94.0
86.3
93.0
85.2
96.4
94.6
98.1
93.4
, 90.5
92.1
98.5
95.2

Total
8,875,083
22,120
35,561
5,193,669
23,233
24,014
11,113,976
24,435
9,264
4,417,731
24,882
3,804,971
45,403
10,652,017
38,408
2,824,376
13,922

BIG TEN CONFRONTS LOW ENROLLMENTS:

The School of Social Work
is pleased to announce
The 19778 Winkelman Lecture
Speaker: PROF. ZENA SMITH BLAU
"Race-Ethnicity and Aging"
Wednesday, April 19-4 P.M.
Rackham Amphitheatre
lecture is open to the public'

I

0 SFEYECR0W
will read contemporary
Native American poetry,°
including his own of
CHARINO CROSS BOOKSHOP
316 S. State St.
* TUESDAY18APRIL-8:00 P.M.

Minori
(Continued from Page 1)
Wisconsin said Wisconsin has a
problem in that "most of our minority
students come from out of state, and the
out of state tuition is very high."
Most of the Big Ten schools claim
they are making special attempts to
recruit minority students. Yvonne
Bowen, Assistant Director of the
Wisconsin's Five Year Program, one
which works with minority students,
describes the program's recruitment
policy.
"The program admits minority and
lower income students to the University
who would not ordinarily have access,"
explained Bowen. "They might have
gone to a high school that didn't
prepare them adequately. Those
students we feel we can help are admit-
ted."
LEE JUNE of the Counseling Center
at Michigan State University said,
however, "recruiting is not as
aggressive as it was in the late 60s and
early 70s."
Overall, most of the Big Ten univer-
sities acknowledge a decrease in their
minority populations in the past few
years. Along with recruitment
problems, attrition is cited as a major
factor in the drop.
"Since OSU is so large and formal,
many leave us," said Caban. He
stressed the importance of having
many minority students of various
groups on campus. "If you see
somebody of your own background, you
don't feel as alone - you feel more at
home," Caban said.
ACCORDING TO LANE, Wisconsin is
"basically a white university in a white
community. We don't have sufficient
minority faculty, or classes relevant to
minorities," he said.
Feelings of alienation seem to be a
dominant theme among students on
most of the Big Ten campuses. "The

ty woes1
culture of a university as an institution
alienates students," said Keith San-
diford, a student from the West Indies
who attends the University of Illinois.
"What is supposed to be a privilege
becomes a frustration."
Colleen Jones, Director of the Special
Support Services at the University of
Iowa, said "the students are used to
places with indigenous communities,
and there is no such community at
Iowa. The loss of that community is a
problem."
WALTER CLARK, a graduate student
at Iowa, said "many freshmen feel lone-
ly coming out to a place like Iowa,
because thater's no social life, just the
university.
According to Lane, many students
complain about the lack of social ac-
tivities geared toward minority studen-
ts. "I study hard, but I have nothing to
do on weekends,' many tell me," said
Lane. "Whites haven't reached out to
the minority students," he sighed.
"And I know I don't feel comfortable
being the only minority at an event."
"It's a situation of alienation, it's a
situation of indifference, it's a situation
of apathy," said Vincent Gilbert, a
senior at the University of Indiana of
the life of a minority- student there.
"Like all things at this university, it
(the helping of minorities) works in a
vacuum-separate from the rest of the
world," he said.
"MOST MINORITY students drop
out for non-academic reasons,"
claimed one student at the University of
Michigan who prefers to. remain
anonymous. "Each year they cut out
money," she said, explaining that the
students who receive financial
aid-many of which are
minorities-are expected to make $600
during the summer, but that the money
given out is always over $600 less than
the last year.
The Michigan student also Cited

i

abound
grade problems as a reason for studen-
ts dropping out. "There is subtle racism
on this campus," she stated.
The student cited examples of
various minority students who feel that
some teachers are giving them lower
grades than the non-minority students
for doing the same quality of work.
ACCORDING TO Dianne Earley, who
works at the Afro-American Student Af-
fairs Office at Northwestern Univer-
sity, the excessive academic com-
petition at the university "affects
students emotionally. That's something
black people- aren't into-com-
petition-and that's what's here," said
Earley.
Most of the universities in the Big Ten
have instigated progranms geared
toward helping minority students ad-
just to and handle the university. Many
.of these programs are run by, or em-
ploy, minority students.
"When we have new students come
in, we try to open up our lives to them;"
said Virgil Sohm, a sophomore who
directs the Amrerican Indian Student
Cultural Center at the University of
Minnesota.

SIf you have Used Books
TUD to Sell Read Thisl
As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy book selling by students-
ULRICH'S would like to review with you their BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which-because of the law of supply and
demand-has its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS I. CLOTHBOUND
A textbook of current copyright-used on our campus-and which the Teaching Department
involved has approved for re-use in upcoming semesters-has the highest market value. If
ULRICH'S needs copies of this book we will offer a minimum of 50% off the list price for copies
in good physical condition. When we have sufficient stock of a title for the coming semester,
ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will beexplained later in this article. (THIS
IS ONE REASON FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE!)
CLASS II. PAPERBOUND
Paperbacks are classified in two groups: A. Text Paperbacks; B. Trade Paperbacks
A. Text Paperbacks will be purchased from you as Class I books above.
B. Trade Paperbacks would draw an approximate offer of 25% of the list price when in excel-
lent condition.
CLASS III.
Some of the above Class I or Class II books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose
pages, large amounts of highlighting and underlining, or other physical defects. These will be
priced down according to the estimated cost of repair or saleability.
CLASS IV.
Each semester various professors decide to change text for a given course. These decisions on
change of textbooks are made in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY far above the level
of your local book retailers, AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (Quite often we
have MANY copies of the old title of which you have only ONE.)
However, ULRICH's does enter the picture by having connections with over 600 other book-
stores throughout the country. We advertise these discontinued books and sell many of them
at schools where they are still being used. ULRICH'S does this as a service to you and pays you
the BEST POSSIBLE price when you sell them to us with your currently used books.
CLASS V.
Authors and publishers frequently bring out new editions. When we "get caught" with an old
edition, let's accept the fact that it has no value on the wholesale market, and put it on the
shelf as a reference book or sell it cheap for a bargain reference book.
You will find that you come out best In the long run when you sell ALL your books
to ULRICH'S.

SATYAJIT RAY'S
THE MUSIC ROOM

1959

Bengali. A landowner's passion for musical festivals uses up his fortune and
destroys his family. After years of solitude, he begins the music once more.
Ray's haunting film is a powerful and tragic tale of the human passion for
perfection. Music by Ravi Shankar.
MON: Lubitsch's TROUBLE IN PARADISE (at 7 & 9:05)

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7 & 9:05

OLD ARCH AUD.
$1.50

Digs-may
lose his,
posts in
House
WASHINGTON (AP) - A
congressman who is leading an attempt
to strip Rep. Charles Diggs of his com-
mittee chairmanships until the courts
decide whether Diggs is guilty of fraud
charges, says he is uncertain whether
to force the issue..
"We must presume him innocent un-
til proven guilty," Rep. Peter Kost-
mayer, (D-Pa.), said of Diggs, a
Michigan Democrat.
O$UT KOSTMAYER added that he
also believes Diggs must live by
"tougher and stricter standards than
other people."
A federal indictment handed down
March 24 accuses Diggs of padding his
payroll and taking kickbacks from his
employees.
Diggs has maintained his innocence
and is refusing to step down as chair-
man of the House District of Columbia
Committee and the House International
Relations Committee's subcommittee
on Africa.
KOSTMAYER, WHO initiated the
campaign to have Diggs step aside,
acknowledged in an interview that the
move doesn't have many backers and
said he is undecided about pressing the
issue.
The 35-count indictment, issued when
Diggs was touring Africa, accused the
veteran congressman of defrauding the
government of more than $101,000.
Diggs pleaded innocent to the
charges and a trial has been tentatively
set for June 26.
"A CHAIRMANSHIP is very dif-
ferent from holding a seat in
Congress," Kostmayer said in ex-
plaining his move to force Diggs to step
aside. "A chairmanship is a privilege,
not a right."
Diggs declined to comment on Kost-
mayer's and Maguire's request.
I T...t T.JAnn f

I I

Torture, Death... or
the Right of Asylum
. 4
Marroquin
Speaks
Hector Marroquin is a political refugee seeking asylum in the United
States. As a student leader in Monterrey, Mexico, he was falsely accused
of murder in 1974. He fled to the United States. Despite the constant
threat of deportation, he became active in a Teamsters organizing
drive and in the socialist movement. 'He is currently fighting a U.S.
government attempt to send him back4o-Mexico where he faces certain
imprisonment, torture, and possible death.

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