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April 14, 1978 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-14

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Page 8-Friday, April 14, 1978-The Michigan Daily

'U' faculty secretly recruit

official channels at the univer-
sity-through the placement office or
whatever appropriate official aspect of
the university that is involved in that
particular thing."
When Ford, who is now a consultant
to the Senate Select Committee on In-
telligence Activities, was asked recen-
tly for comment on secret recruitment
operations here, he referred all
questions about his activities to the
Select Committee's press agent.
After about three years as coor-
dinator forAcademic Relations, Ford
left the CIA to enter academic life in
Washington, D.C. In a congratulatory
letter to Ford, one unidentified Univer-
sity professor wrote, "I trust that we
will remain in touch, now as academic
colleagues!"
BUT SECRET CIA recruiting on
college campuses did not begin or end
with Ford. In 1966, the CIA began a
Summer Intern Program in foreign
studies. The program, which was open
to anyone interested, gave students an
opportunity to do "substantive
scholarly research in their fields of
academic research."
The program, which is still in
operation, is geared toward graduate
students, and allows individuals to
work with "professional analysts." An
explicit goal of the program was CIA
recruitment - about half of the sum-
mer interns beome permanent CIA em-
ployees, according to the Agency.
While Summer Intern Program
literature was made available to more
than a hundred colleges and univer-
sities, including Michigan, a letter from
the CIA to one University professro -
shows that the actual recruiting did not
occur in the "official" manner, that is,
through the Career Planning and
Placement office.t
THE LETTER, dated February 10,
1967, states: "Because it (the Summer
Intern Program) isto be a very small
and somewhat experimental effort on
our part, we hope to develop a list of
candidates through personal contacts.
"Our regular Recruiting Officers, of
course," the letter continues, "know of
the program and are prepared to
discuss it with any student who may be
interested in this kind of summer ac-
tivity. I would, of course, appreciate
your calling this program to the atten-
tion of any serious and mature student
whom you think would be a likely can-
didate."
When several department heads were
asked if they knew anything about
professors covertly recruiting for the
CIA, all responded negatively.
"Nobody I know is (recruiting) - and
I certainly know nothing about that,"

said Albert Feuewerker, director of the
Center for Chinese Studies.
Samuel Barnes, chairman of the
Political Science Department, said, "I
have no familiarity with it (covert
recruiting) and certainly no knowledge
of any cases."
IN IT'S INITIAL report, the Senate
Select Committee noted that, in most
secret recruitment operations, "no one
other than the individual academic
concerned is aware of the CIA link."
On December 20, 1974, Gary Foster,
at that time coordinator for Academic
Relations for the CIA, mailed 28 letters,
including one to an unidentified contact
at this University, asking for "help in
spotting candidates for an intensified
minority hirihg program we are
currently conducting."
In the letter, Foster said the CIA was
"primarily looking for analysts and
researchers in international politics, in-
ternational economic systems and
related disciplines. We also need
linguists, particularly in the rarer
European and Asian languages,
especially Russian and Chinese."
In closing, Foster pledged
anonymity. "Your contact with us on
this subject will be treated informally
and confidentially. We will appreciate
any help you can give us and I look for-
ward to hearing from you."
' UNIVERSITY President Robben
Fleming yesterday said he found
nothing wrong with the content of any of
the three letters.
"There isn't anything surprising
about this," he said. This type of
recruiting is "done by all employers."
FLeming said that in order for an in-
telligence organization to function.

"they have to have competent people."
And just like other agencies or cor-
porations who are looking for the
highest quality employees, he said, the
CIA comes to universities which yield
likely candidates.
When asked why the CIA keeps this
kind of search for talent a secret,
Fleming said, "the only reason that I
can see is that they may have told those
people (professors) that their recom-
mendations would be held confiden-
tial."
FLEMING SAID not all professors
are secretive about this kind of contact
with the CIA. "Some are very open
about it and wouldn't hesitate to tell you
that it is their patriotic duty to make
these recommendations," he said.
But in The Daily's investigation there
were no professors who would admit to
the kind of recruiting referred to in the
CIA documents.
"I would bet you that 60 per cent of
the recruiting (government and cor-
porate) doesn't go on in the placement
office," said Fleming. The problem, he
said, is whether the Agency, "departs
from what many of us consider normal
ethical standards." Fleming said he
save no such departure in the latest
documents.,
The Campaign to Stop Government
Spying, headed by Morton Halperin,
former Deputy Assistant Secretary of
Defense and one-time Senior Staff
member of the National Security Coun-
cil, is now urging the University to
adopt guidelines which would force
, professors to make public any contact
with the CIA.

"Your Local Photofinisher"
* 4 HOUR EKTACHROME SLIDE
PROCESSING
* SAME DAY KODACOLOR PRINTS
SEE OUR YELLOW PAGES AD
UNDER PHOTO FINISHING FOR
A LIST OF OUR OTHER SERVICES.

Daily obtains 200
Gins
reports on 'U
CIA agents. Continued from Page 1)
UNDER THE FOIA, government agencies such as the CIA, have the
right to delete material in certain circumstances when responding to
requests for information. The CIA made extensive use of three legal exem-
ptions in censoring material responsive to the Daily's request, such as
names, dates, and places.
According to the CIA, the deletions were justified because the infor-
mation requested was "properly classified" and therefore exempt under
Executive Order 11652.
The Agency also claimed exemptions "to protect from disclosure in-
telligence sources and methods, as well as the organiztion, functions, official
titles, salaries or numbers of personnel employed by the Agency in accor-
dance with the National Security Act of 1947 and the CIA Act of 1949."
THE FINAL EXEMPTION the Agency used applied to "information,
release of which would constitute an unwarranted invasion of the personal
privacy of other individuals."
In a letter attached to the documents received by the Daily, the CIA
said: "Any additional records, if they exist, which would be responsive to
your request . . . would be duly classified under criteria set forth in
Executive Order 11652."
The CIA then stated: "By this answer, we are neither denying nor con-
firming that any such additional records exist."
The Daily has appealed the CIA's decision to delete and possibly
withhold information which would be responsive to the Daily's request under
the FOIA. The Daily has also appealed the Agency's refusal to confirm or
deny the existence of any additional records.

INFACT
protests
Nestle
)polic
By LEONARD BERNSTEIN
Despite bleak skies and gusting win-
ds, about 30 demonstrators rallied on
the Diag to protest advertising claims .
made about infant formulas by
American corporations in Third World
countries.
The demonstration was sponsored by
local members of the Infant Formula
Action Coalition (INFACT) in connec-
tion with national INFACT Day. IN-
FACT is protesting the promotion of in-
fant formulas in the Third World which
the group says ,leads to infant
malnutrition and death.
YESTERDAY'S protest was directed
at Nestle Corporation, whose Swiss-
based parent company is the world's
largest distributor of infant formula.
INFACT claims that Nestle's mass
media promotion of infant formula in-
duces mothers to use the formula in-
stead of breast feeding. Because
mothers cannot afford to feed their
children the proper amounts of the
formula, and because of unsafe
sanitary conditions, INFACT says in-
fant malnutrition results.
Nestle states that all cans of its for-
mula bear warnings that breast feeding
is best for'infants.
Similar protest took place
simultaneously in Minneapolis, Minn.,
home of the national INFACT
organization and White Plains, N.Y.
where Nestle U.S.A. is based. A Bosto
group planned to dump cases of Nestea
into Boston Harbor.
LOCAL PROTESTORS heard folk
songs and speeches on the Diag and
then marched down Liberty St. to mail
postcards protesting Nestly policy.
"We have to bring pressure to bear on
Nestle and think about the corporate
system that makes it possible," said
INFACT member Fred Small.
Steven Korsen, Nestle manager of
Consumer Affairs read a prepared
statement in reaction to INFACT day.
In itststatement, Nestle called the
protest "sensationalized, false and
misleading."
Korsen added, that INFACT's boycott
of Nestle products "discriminated
against Nestle" because no other infant
formula producer is subject to such
"public campaigns" in the United
States.
INFACT spokesperson Solonge
Muller said she expects congressional
action on infant formula marketing
policy soon. According to Muller,
Senator Edward Kennedy's (D-Mass.)
subcommittee' on Antitrust and
Monopoly and Senator Frank Church's
(D-Idaho) subcommittee on Foreign
Economic Policy will both hold
hearings on the issue in May.
DEDICATED JONES
BALTIMORE (AP) - Pro football
player's are not famed for their
dedication to practice but quarterback
Bert Jones of the Baltimore Colts is an
exception. His coach, Ted Mar-
chibroda, insists Bert works as hard in
practice sessions as he does in a game.
f "Jones is always thinking, always
working, during a practice drill," Mar-
chibroda said. "He has a reason for
everything he does, a specific purpose
for everything he works on. The results
of his work in practice show up in the
games."

TONIGHT
Gargoyle Films
presents
PETER SELLERS
IN
}"The Mouse That Roared"
plus cartoon "RABDITHOOD"
7:00 and 9:00
Room 100 Hutthins Hall
(Low Quad)
ADMISSION: $1.00

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