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April 14, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-14

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 14, 1978-Page 7

Browne'sA

ro

By MICHAEL BAADKE
AFTER HEARING Jackson Browne
sing about the road and the sky
for the past five years, it's almost im-
possible to imagine him actually having
a "home"; one simply assumes that his
life is based around a prominent seat on
the tour bus, with occasional stops at
identical Holiday Inns.
This road mystique has certainly con-
tributed to the overwhelming success of
Browne's latest album, Running On
Empty. Recorded on tour last summer,
the album is like the unexpected
realization that a popular myth is ac-
tually the concrete truth: Jackson
Browne's home element really is the
highway, the loading docks, and above
all, the stage. Seeing him perform at
Crisler Arena Wednesday night was
like following the myth-come-true one
step further.
The long months of touring with the
Jackson Browne crew seems to have
had nothing but good effects on the per-
formance of opening act Karla Bonoff.
Her recent Columbia album has proven
her to be an intelligent songwriter,
coupling beautiful melodies with (at
last!) genuinely sensitive lyrics. Three
of her songs have been recorded by
Linda Ronstadt, inviting constant com-
parisons between the two, but there's

Daily Photo by WAYNE CABLE
Jackson Browne

one important difference-Bonoff is
better.
SHE OPENED her set with a rocking
performance of "I Can't Hold On,"
supported by a four-member band and
accompanying herself on guitar. Bonoff
is also an accomplished pianist, which
she most definitely demonstrated with
her rendition of "Someone To Lay
Down Beside Me," one of her most
popular tunes. She played eight songs
from Karla Bonoff and one new tune,
"Trouble Again," which is slated for
release on her second LP, due out in
September.
After her set, Bonoff spoke of her
possible impending stardom with
modesty and reserve; "I still think of
myself as a songwriter," she said. "I'd
like to be better and stronger, but in
terms of going in some new direction
... well, I just like to write good songs."
When Jackson Browne and his
touring band appeared on stage the
packed stands let out a spontaneous
roar of approval which virtually shook
the walls of the arena. Browne sealed
that bond of familiarity by smoothly
rocking through "Take It Easy," the
1973 hit which Browne co-wrote with
Glenn Frey of the Eagles. Working in
tight coordination with his back-up
band, Browne proved that the impec-
cable quality of Running On Empty was
no fluke; throughout the evening, the
joy of the live set was enhanced by
near-studio perfection of the perfor-
mance.
BROWNE CONTINUED with a wide
selection of his earlier compositions,
drawing mainly from The Pretender
and Late For The Sky. The audience
ovations continued too; Browne per-
formed "Here Come Those Tears
Again" early in the set, fully expressing
the emotion of the tune as he sang.
Browne's band for this tour is com-
posed entirely of musicians who have
worked with him in the past. One very
familiar figure was David Lindley,
playing fiddle and lap steel guitar.
Browne introduced each member of the
band, which included Jim Gordon on
drums, Bob Glaub on bass, and Craig
Doerge, who did an exceptional job on
keyboards. Rosemary Butler and Doug
Haywood contributed backing vocals;
along with Lindley, they also appeared
on Running On Empty. Introductions
completed, Browne seated himself in
front of the grand piano and informed
the audience, "And I'm Barry
Manilow."
The work of the band was probably
best appreciated half way through the

adstop
set, with an outstanding renditic
Browne's first hit, "Doctor My Ey
Browne played an extended versio
the song, lengthening the rockin
strumental ending to the delight o
audience. Bouncing on the piano be
Browne pounded the keys as guitar
bass rocked with him. Gordon ke
finely timed pace on the tune, m
also featured a solo by Lindley.
IT WAS NOT until the final thi
the concert that Browne pL
material from Running On Empty
the audience's anticipation wasj
than adequately, rewarded. Six o:
last seven songs were from the
LP, beginning with "Cocai
featuring Browne on acoustic g
and Lindley on fiddle. Alone ons
they retained all the dark humor o
song, as Browne splayed a pa:
guitar accompaniment while Lir
alternately plucked the strings o
fiddle and evoked the melancholy
with his bow.
The audience reaction was natu
most enthusiastic when the band r
ned for "Running On Emp
Browne's current hit from the
album. The band played with al
energy which is conveyed on
record, with Browne again on g
belting out exhuberance at
microphone.
The set ended with "The Load-
and "Stay," two songs which, pe
med as a medley, perfectly encapsi
the highway mystique of Jac
Browne. The opening p
arrangement, performed by Bro
leads into.David Lindley's lap stef
companiment, and eventually the
pearance of the entire band. As h{
on the LP, Lindley contributed "a

Stranglers blast America with

a smash
n of vocal performance" on "Stay," with a
res." soaring falsetto on the closing linesof
on of the tune.
g in- Browne and band returned for two
f the encore performances; "The Pret*-
anch, der," possibly Browne's finest com-
and postion, again showed the full taleni of
apt a each musician. The evening closed with
vhich a full tilt rocking version of "The Road
and The Sky" from Late For The Sky.
rd of It was the essence of Jackson Browne
ayed which was conveyed to the audience on
, but Wednesday night; there's always that
more aura of the road to consider when-yog
f the listen to his music, but the fact remain4
new that Browne is a talented musiciani
ne," working with dedicated people;
uitar creating among the finest music
age, available. As he continues to improve
f the Jackson Browne may consider himself
ssive to be running on empty; his performan
idley ce here showed that he's certainly
f his picking up speed.
feel
'rally
trally The German dramatist Heinrichvo
ye Kleist comniitted suicide in 1811 at the
new age of 34.
I the 16c

THE GAME HERE
NEVER ENDS!
BILLIARDS
at the
UNION

New Wave
By ALAN RUBENFELD
and MIKE TAYLOR
W THILE JACKSON Browne
serenaded thousands at Crisler
Wednesday night, a few hundred
listened to a different sort of music at
-Second Chance. New York's Tuff Darts
and'England's Stranglers joined local
favorites Destroy All Monsters for a
four-hour New Wave onslaught.
The Monsters are more advanced in
spirit than many of their punk peers -
their compositions are often free-form,
and the combination of Niagara's vocal
anguish, Ron Asheton's timeless guitar,
and Ben Miller's eerie sax licks is
unique.
Wednesday night's performance was,
however, uneven. Niagara's fondness
-for stimulants besides Tab left her in
less than top form. Compounding this
,problem, the sound mix often buried
'Niagara's voice, and made the band's
'usually fine instrumentation sound
muddy. But Asheton's guitar prowess
seems to be everincreasing; no wonder
Iggy Pop wanted him to tour Europe
with his new band.
TUFF DARTS stormed the stage with
a lightening fast 25-minute set of power-
chord tunes from their recent Sire
debut. A much tighter band than the
Monsters, it's apparent they've already
reached their peak. Unless they work
up some better material, they're
destined to be a terminal warm-up
hand
But a good warm-up band they are.
During their anthem, "All For The
Love of Rock 'n' Roll," singer Tommy
Frenzy jumped from the stage to elicit
some help on the tune, from the eager
crowd. An overzealous roadie put an
end to the fun by hoisting him back
where he "belonged."
No American band can match the
piercing fury of the-Stranglers. Dave
Greenfield plays his synthesizer for
maximum emotional impact, instead of
pretty embellishment. Hugh Cornwell
menaces his guitar strings, producing
savage sheets of sound. Jean Jacques

rock, art,
Burnel's assertive bass playing and Jet
Black's incessant percussion complete
the mesmerizing instrumental mix.
Cornwell and Burnel's impassioned,
frenetic vocals focus the band's sound.
THE STRANGLERS thrilled the
large house with well over an hour of
numbers drawn from their two A&M
albums, Rattus Norvegicus and No
More Heroes. Live, the band sounds far
more powerful than on disc; they fill
the club urgent waves of hypnotic elec-
tricity.
The lyrics transcend the usual rejec-
tion/frustration adolescent pathos.
Like the Sex Pistols, the Stranglers are
repulsed by "modern" society, par-
ticularly capitalism, and their lyrics at-
tempt to channel this wrath into songs.
"Bring on the Nubiles" rips the Deb-
by Boone world of pre-packaged sen-
timent apart. There's no hidden
meaning as Cornwell presents his
primal urge:
I go crozy for you
femme femme fuck you fuck you/ Lemme femme
fuck you fuck you
Any other punk band would sing these
lyrics as a crowd-pleasing joke; Cor-
nwell is serious.
"THERE'S NO more heroes, even in
Michigan," blasted Cornwell before the
band plunged into their anti-anthem,
"No More Heroes." After the show, the
group explained they believe there's no
future for capitalism. Thus, there are
no more heroes.
"Can you drive a tank?" queried
Cornwell at another point. "Then you'd
better start learning," he continued. "If
we start another war, you'll have to go
out there and kill people for America."
Later on, Burnel spoke about what it's
like to grow up with American military
bases all around. He also chastised
American multi-national corporate im-
perialism in Europe.
So far, everything the Stranglers
have seen about America has disgusted
them. "70 million Americans are over-
weight," scolded Burnel. "That's 70
million Americans malnourished." The

and politics
band sees America's role as a world
leader diminishing as capitalism
deteriorates and as Europe grows in
strength.
The evening's highlight was "Down
in the Sewer," an extended, four-part
number from the first LP. The band
handled the complex instrumental par,
ts with finesse, reminding one during
frequent improvisations of their only
possible American rivals, Television.
Burnel later admitted that though the
band is generally as contemptuous of
the American New Wave as they are of
the rest of America, they admire
Television.
As far as the Stranglers are concer-
ned, there's as little future for the
throng who crowded Second Chance
Wednesday night as there is for
America in general.

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
presents at MLB
Friday, April 14
PUMPING IRON
(George Butler and Robert Fiore, 1977) 7, 8:40 & 10:20-MLB 3
"Think of a bodybuilder as on artist, with the grace of a dancer .
PUMPING IRON takes an aesthetic look at the exotic, exclusive subculture of
weight-lifters, with real-life winners and losers. Champion of champions
ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER (of Bob Rafelson's STAY HUNGRY fame) coaches
LOUIS FERRIGNO (a real-life Rocky) in the art of the perfect body. With
FRANCO COLUMBU, MIKE KATZ. ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
HEAD
(Bob Rafelson, 1968) 7 only-MLB 4
Co-written with JACK NICHOLSON. Featuring the MONKEES, RAY NITSCHKE,,
ANNETTE FUNICELLO, SONNY LISTON, VICTOR MATURE, and aspecial guest
APPEARANCE BY FRAND ZAPPA as The Critic! With fascinating visual effects
and songs by Carole King and Harry Nilsson.
STAY HUNGRY
(Bob Rafelson, 1976) 9 ONLY-ML54
Engaging tale of a wedlthy orphan who walks'out o'nhis'family's business,
leaves his mansion, and heads for Birmingnam, Alabama, to experience
"real life." He starts hanging out with a group of body builders and becomes
friends with the gym's hero, who gives him this advice: "Stay hungry and
you'll taste life:" Rafelson,(FIVE EASY PIECES, KING OF MARVIN GARDENS) is
one of America's most original and interesting directors. His wry, off-beat
view of life makes STAY HUNGRY a unique look at the themes that
constantly concern him-dreams, reality and the problem of making them
coexist. JEFF BRIDGES, SALLY FIELD, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER.
Tomorrow: Wim Wonders' THE AMERICAN FRIEND at MLB

MEDIATRICS presents
LADY SINGS THE BLUES
This film is a biography of Billie Holliday, perhaps the greatest American
Blues singer. She is played magnificently by Diana Ross. Also starring
BILLY DEE WILLIAMS and RICHARD PRYOR.
Friday, April 14 7:00 & 9:30 Nat. Sci. Aud.
-AND-
PAPER CHASE
TIMOTHY BOTTOMS plays a first year law student striving to do well aca-
demically, and date his professor's daughter at the same time. By the end of
the film he decides just how important grades really are. Definitely an appro-
priate film for the end of the semester.
Saturday, April 15 7:30 & 9:30 Nat. Sci. Aud.
ADMISSION $1.50
769.8780. 1-94 a S sta E
DA O E,
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES - Adults $1.25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thvu SAT. 10 A.M. tif,1:3a P.M. SUN. & HOLS.12 Noon til 9:30 P.M.

HEPBURN & TRACY in 1942
WOMAN OF THE YEAR
Sportswriter marries brilliant female political commentor and learns quickly
she is not going to change from Ms.,to Mrs. As relevant today as ADAM'S
RIB-with a courtship of seeming mismatched mates as extreme as Bogart
and Hepburn in THE AFRICAN QUEEN. With Spencer, Katherine, William
Bendix, sports and news events.
CINEMA GUILD OLD ARCH. AUD. 7:00& 9:05 $1.50

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