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April 09, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AN

F-

" . BOB STECHUK successfully upheld flexible distribu-
tion requirements in the Curriculum committee ... With-
out these individuals, no apparatus exists to guarantee
LSA Students that they are represented in the college."
-The Michigan Daily Feb. 15, 1978.
Vote to retain successful student representation
BACK PA Ct For LSA Student Government
VOTE APRIL 10-12
Bob Stechuk/Kathy Friedman, President/ Vice President

r

Page 2-Sunday, April 9, 1978-The Michiga' Daily
MSU conference: food for though1

Valerie Mims
Bruce Kozarsky

Mary Hallesy
Michael Epstein

Josh Vincent
Paul Portz

J

By SUSAN HOLLMAN
The feeding habits of college-age
women and their adverse effects on
health were discussed this weekend at
the Politics of Food Conference at
Michigan State University.
The conference was designed as a
forum for discussion of local and inter-
national topics relating to food and
hunger, among them health food stores,
U.S. agriculture problems and the role
of the U.S. in feeding underdeveloped
nations.
ACCORDING TO A 1977 University of
Minnesota survey, 14 per cent of
college-age women receive less than 60

per cent of the recommended daily
amounts of iron, which could lead to
marginal anemia, particularly during
pre-menstrual days.
Gilbert Leveille, chairman of the
MSU Food Service Dept. presented the
survey results and explained that
college-age women are often dieting,
which leads to limitations on their
nutritional intake. He said this has bee
known to result in cases of severe
malnutrition.
In addition, Leveille said he is alar-
med by the growing number of health
food stores. Although he said the
products sold in the stores are not in-

trinsically harmful, Leveille said
people may be duping themselves into
believing these foods can work health
miracles.
IN HONOR OF the state-wide con-
ference, Gov. William Milliken
declared April "Michigan Food and
Hunger Month." In his official
declaration, Milliken urged Michigan
citizens to increase their understanding
of world food problems and to work
toward solutions.
The conference opened with an ad-
dress by Dale Hathaway, Assistant
Secretary of International Affairs and
Commodity. Hathaway said the U.S.

wr

CHOOSING A COLLEGEMAJOR?
CHOOSING A CAREER?
CAREER SATISFACTION LATER
requires careful planning and
evaluatiorr NOW.
Knowing your natural abilities can
help you make the right decisions.
if you are considering choices that will affect your career future, an
ASSESSMENT OF APTITUDES is a useful first phase in your planning. It
can provide you with the criteria necessary for making EDUCATIONAL
PLANS, CAREER DECISIONS, and LIFE GOALS.
JOHNSON O'CONNER RESEARCH FOUNDATION
HUMAN ENGINEERING LABORATORY
a non-profit organization condkting
aptitude measurement since 1922

should no longer feel responsible for
feeding the developing countries of the
world unless the countries have demon-
strated a willingness to help them-
selves.
According to Hathaway, it is "not a
practical or realistic solution" for the
U.S. to supply increased food aid to
poor countries. He said this dampens
local price incentives, as well as in-
terest in the developing countries to
improve from within.
SATURDAY'S sessions brought
severe'criticism of the present situation
of the American farmer from both far-
mers themselves and government
representatives.
Roger Gentz, a field crop farmer and
spokesman for Michigan farmers at-
tending the conference, said "Farmers
have lost faith in their government"
because they feel the government has
done nothing to halt diminishing profit
returns for the farmers.
According to B. Dale Ball, Director of
the Michigan Department of
Agriculture, the answer to the problem
of increasing farm profits to allow for
the expanding cost of living lies in in-
creasing government aid.

MSA fees, LegalAid, up for vote

(Continued from Page 1)
stable budget.
"WE'RE PUTTING all our eggs in
one basket," Lauer said in an interview
several weeks ago,
Some MSA Members criticized the

proposed fee increase because it does
not give students a chance to support
Legal Aid and not support the MSA
general budget increase.
Lauer said the two could not be
separated, however, charging that an
administration official had told him the

Regents would not approve separate
funding for MSA and Legal Aid. Lauer'
refused to name the administration of-
ficial.
A Daily check of three University
administrators, however, failed to sub-
stantiate the Lauer charge. ,

For brochure, write or callI-
Johnson 0'Conner Research Foundation
47 East Adams Street
Detroit, Michigan 48226
(313)963-9185
Atlanta Chicogo Fort Worth
Boston Detroit

Los Angeles
Houston

San Diego
New York

Washington
Tulso

Deciding on
----e a Law Career?
PRE-LAW
INFORMATION NIGHT
Monday, April 10-7:30 P.M.
1025 Angell Hall

PITCH
IN!
Birth Defects
ore forever.
Unless you
HELP
MARCH Of DIMES
GERBIL' TNH

USSR attacks Carter on bomb

4Continued from Page 1)
neutron weapons are an extraneous
issue the United States has introduced
into the world arms picture, confusing
and upsetting progress toward a new
strategic arms limitation agreement.
The Soviets had hoped to deal
separately with the issue by a special
'renunciation" of neutron weapons by
both countries: But the idea was rejec-
ted by washington on the grounds that
it ignored Soviet advances in other
areas and that the Soviets have little
use for neutron weapons anyway.
U.S. officials have said neutron
warheads are designed to defend
against a Warsaw Pact invasion of
The ancient Egyptian pharaohs
prized the turquoise stone and some-
times sent thousands of miners under
guard to the Sinai Peninsula to find
them. In the New World, turquoise
was used by prehistoric Indians for
pendants, beads, mosaics and carved
figures.
About 80 per cent of Somalia's
-population lives by rearing livestock,
especially goats and sheep.

Western Europe. The nuclear devices
would kill tank crews with heavy
radiation but would have relatively lit-
tle blast or heat and would be less
damaging to nearby friendly forces and
civilian populations.

Western analysts here expect a series
of Soviet newspaper and , public
statements in the next several days fur-
ther denouncing Carter's 'decision,
directed both at foreign opinion and the
Soviet Union's own population.

Volunteer brings
63 years of cheer

yQ- i

" What is law
school like?
" How doI
prepare for law?
" Howdolapply
to law school?,

ON
SONS
.. NI
in
FISh
Universi
C, Mic
Literary
.3 HIMI

S A L E
Ow
the

SATLE III

By BETH ROSENBERG
Sixty-three years ago, a spry, dark-
haired Marie Mickle marched through
the doors at University Hospital ready
to volunteer her services.
Now 86, she still works at the hospital,
though the building itself has moved
from its old Catherine St. address.
"Worlking there keeps me young,"
she chuckles as she slumps back into a
delicate wooden chair which decorates
the middle of her living-room.
THOUGH SHE says she would like to

0
Imu
so
m
I
I

continue working at the hospital for as
long as possible, Mickle has been kept
at home for the past month while
recuperating from a badly burned hip.
Tomorrow, Mickle will attend
ceremony where she will be rewarded
by the hospital for her more than 7000
hours of service. She and other volun-
teers will be presented with a pin
bearing the University Hospital seal.
Besides her six hours of hospital work
a week, Mickle has run a referral ser-
vice for crippled children and adults
since 1970. Before that, she helped out
at the Washtenaw County Public Health
children's hearing clinic for 17 years.
Originally from Columbus, Ohio,
Mickle moved to Anw Arbor in 1914
when her husband began teaching
mechanical engineering at the Univer-

HBO L

Freshfolk-Seniors welcome
Sponsored by the Pre-Professional Office

ty Of
-higan
M~agaz ine

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
THE GONDOLIERS
April 12-15, 1978
Mendelssohn Theatre, Michigan League
University of Michigan

© 1978 JOS. SCHLITZ BREWING CO.. MILWAUKEE. WIS.
HOW TO TAP A KEG.

PERFOkMANCES:
Wednesday, April 12 at 8 p.m. @ $3.50
Thursday, April 13 at 8 p.m. @ $3.50
Friday, April 14 at 8 p.m. @ $4.00
Saturday, April 15 at 2 p. m. @ $3.50
Saturday, April15S at 8 p. m. @ $4.00)

Extremely limited
tickets available

Few things in life are as rewarding or as easy as tapping a keg of cold
Schlitz draught beer, providing you follow a few simple rules:
1. Do not roll the keg down a hill before attempting to tap it.
2. Do not pump in too much pressure after tapping. This can force
the natural carbonation out of the beer and make it foamy.
3. If the persf )n tapping the keg makes either of these mistakes,
politely point out the error of his ways. Unless, of course, he weighs
265, plays tackle, and goes by the nickname of Moose. In this case
you should simply say, "Nice gain' Moose"
To get a keg for your next party, call Siglinda's Beer Person on
Campus, or look in the yellow pages under "Beer'
Class dismissed. __ i_ _ siglinda

FOR TICKET INFORMATION BEFORE APR. 9,
994-0221:AFTER APR. 9. 763-1085

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Mickle
sity. Since 1922 she has lived at the
same house on Olivia St., when street-
cars, she says, were a common sight.
"When we first came here there were
eleven people on the mechanical
engineering faculty," recalled the grey-
haired widow of 30 years. "Now there
are 75. The university has really gotten
big."
Footabll, she says, was always big at
the University. "I remember the day
we lost to Illinois when Red Grange
scored four touchdowns," she recalled.

There's
a solution but...
Birth
defects
are
forever.
Unless
you help.
March
of Dimes

l
i

Ellen
Wilt

I

0

I

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