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April 06, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-06

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1- /
j.. Ir U SEE * , V M C L * -M
Hunger strike ends
Fifteen Iranian students who had refused to eat for five days en-
ded their fast Sunday. The hunger strike was staged to protest prison
conditions and treatment of prisoners in Iran and students had vowed
to continue the strike until their demands were met. A spokesperson at
the Lord of Light Lutheran Church, where the strike took place; said
" the Iranians felt their demands were realized. None of the striking
students, who refuse to give their identities for fear of reprisal from
the Iranian secret police, could be reached for comment, however.
Happenings...
... comb your hair, smile and say "cheese" because tomorrow
will be the last day for senior portrait sittings for the 1979 Michiganen-
sian. To make an appointment call.764-0561 between 9 a.m. and 9
p.m.... the Black Student Union sponsors an anti-Bakke demon-
stration on the Diag at noon . . "You'll Get Yours When You're 65" is
the title of a flick to be shown at noon in the South Lecture Hall of Med.
Sci. II. It's sponsored. by the American Medical Student Association,
but you'll have to guess what it's about . . "Genetic Counseling:
Rural Delivery Service," a series of videotaped lectures, will be
shown at 3 at 139 S. First St. . .. the Early Book Symposium features
German Prof. Gerhard Dunnhaupt speaking on "The Ship of Fools" in
Auditorium D, Angell Hall. . . Dr. A. Odlyzko of Bell Labs will deliver
a math department special lecture on "String Overlaps, Pattern-
Matchings, and Non-transitive Games" at 4 in 4004 Angell
Hall ... "Developmental Learning of Young Children" will be the
subject of a workshop sponsored by the Ann Arbor Childcare and
Development Center at 6:30 at 1432 Washtenaw . . . the Un-
dergraduate Political Science Association will hold elections for next
year at its final meeting at 7 in the 6th floor poli sci lounge, Haven
Hall. . . the City Council meeting, postponed because of Monday's
election, will take place at 7:30 in the Council Chambers, second floor
of City Hall . . . University of California-Davis, Prof. Edwin Lemert
speaks on "Alcohol and Social Controls" at 7:30 in 3063 Frieze . .. the
World Hunger Task Force will show "Voice of Hunger" and "The
Right to Eat" at 7:30 in conference rooms 4 and 5 of the Union . . . Gay
Christians will discuss "Relating to Family" at the Newman Center,
331 Thompson at 7:30. . . Bob and Bill Farmer will read their poetry
at Guild House, 802 Monroe, also at 7:30 . . .Poet Jonathan Wordswor-
th will, be at Rackham Auditorium at 8... History of Art Prof. Clinton
Olds will discuss "The Ars Moriendi: The Birth, Life and Death of an
Illustrated Book" and Theodore Beardsley will'speak on "The Early
Spanish Book" at 8 in Auditorium D, Angell Hall. . . Music Prof.
Leslie Bassett will speak on "Inspiration or Perspiration? - Music's
Recurring Question" at 8 in the Recital Hall of the School of
Music. . . the Center for Western European Studies presents
Wolfgang Roth in "Voices from the Past: Berlin Theatre and Cabaret
Songs from the Golden Twenties" at 9 on the terrace of the University
Club, performed in German with English commentary.
Trashy ruling
A man named Nixon once proved to us that tape recordings are not
beyond public inspection, but how about garbage? A U.S. Circuit Court
ruled Tuesday that a person's privacy does not extend to the rubbis
once outside of his house. The three judges who made the decision
upheld the conviction of Thomas Shelby, whose conviction of a coin
shop robbery was based on evidence found in his trash can. Per-
sonally, we think the wholequestion should be thrown out.
On the outside...
It will be mostly cloudy with occasional showers today and a high
of 66. Keep your fingers crossed and maybe the rain will stop long
enough for the Detroit Tigers and Mark "The Bird" Fidrych to play
their home opener scheduled for this afternoon at Tiger Stadium. Bat-
ter up
Daily Official Bulletin
:4::::::::w::4::::::4::-:4:::ii~i~~i~~i~iixt::-xt:::i:::::::.:.:::::::::-.:.:::::.-:+

Ex-Ford employee
tries to patent airbag
as 'execution device'

By ANIDA ROSSMAN
A retired Ford Motor Co. employee is
trying to patent a new execution device
- the airbag.
Ann Arborite Emile Grenier said he
applied for the patent because he is so
convinced the inflatable bag, designed
as an auto safety device, is more likely
to cost lives rather than spare them.
BUT GRENIER insists his motives
are not as ghoulish as they may sound.
"My purpose is not to get into the
execution business," he explained, "but
to stop unwary Americans from getting
executed."
If airbags become a part of the 1980s
safety standards, "car buyers will shell
out an additional $300 for this "safety
feature." "In essence," Grenier said,
"you'd be paying extra for something
that can kill you.''
Grenier was one of several auto
safety engineers who participated in
the initial 15 months of airbag research.
And he says the devices are more than
just a bunch of hot air. ,
TESTIFYING BEFORE the United
States Department-of Transportation
last April, Grenier called the man-
datory airbag a "potentially lethal ob-
ject" and urged the Department and
the National Highway Traffic Safety
Institute Insurance Company not to im-

pose it upon the public.
Grenier says the airbags could have
several dangerous and potentially fatal
effects. Since they inflate in a matter of
seconds, Grenier says they can easily
break the neck of a passenger who is
out of position, such as bending forward
or sleeping. In addition, he says, the
devicetdoes not give secondary impact
protection.
Grenier maintains the airbag is sim-
ply no alternative to the use of seat-
belts. Whereas passive constraint"
(airbags) may be more appealing to
lazy or forgetful passengers than "ac-
tive constraint" .(seatbelts), he noted
that unless the two are used in conjun-
ction submarining - sliding under the
bag - could occur.
UNTIL NOW, Grenier's attempts to
make his findings public have been
frustrated. But now that he's decided to
try to patent the bags as an execution
device, "I've finally hit on a way to gain
attention."
"It's high time we got reaction from
the people of the street, rather than
bureaucrats in Washington," he said.
The government, CGrenier charged,
"has this crazy idea that we (the auto
industry) can do anything. They think
that we have to be protected from our-
selves. Ironically, they are pushing
dangerous, expensive things on us."

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
The names have been changed ..
The Residential College has been apparently rechristened with its oft-quoted
nickname by an anonymous prankster.

Power unintimidated
by Griffin; still in race

i *M - N9* y ~ l

LANSING (UPI) - Democratic U.S.
Senate candidate Phil Powervowed
yesterday to remain in the crowded
race despite the return of incumbent
Republican Robert Griffin to the cam-
paign.
"I will not pull out, period," the
wealthy suburban published said at a
news conference called to explain his
four-point program to boost em-
ployment.
POWER SAID he has spent about
$100,000 out of his own pocket thus far
and recently has been campaigning
heavily outstate. He plans soon to begin
moving in on the Detroit metroolitan
area.
He agreed with several other can-
didates and political observers who
have given the early lead in the
Democratic race to Detroit City Coun-
cilman Carl Levin, well-known in the
crucial Detroit area.
"I think Carl's a very strong can-
didate," he said, but he added. "Just
name identification at this stage of the
campaign is no sign that anybody's
going to win."
POWER ALSO said he has a formula
for winning, based on the 1972 race bet-
ween Griffin and Attorney General
Ftank Kelley. Nail down the hard core
Democratic vote around the state, run
wel with Michigan's large group of in-

dependent voters and capture the
Detroit suburbs, where antibusing sen-
timent contributed to Kelley's defeat.
Democratic field may begin to
narrow when the June 5 date for filing LEV I SA LE
petitions arrives and candidates must Levi s
produce 25,000 signatures on
nominating petitions.
But the prospect is for a large field of
candidates for the primary. There are
indications, Power said, that television Corduroy Bells-
advertising time will be difficult to pur-
chase, making the name recognition
battle even tougher. TwoM an
The decibel is an arbitrary unit of Backpackers Tent
measure of sound pressure or power.
It is equivalent to one-tenth of a bel, a
dimensionless unit named for Alex- 210 E. Washington at Fo
ander Graham Bell, who invented the VISAS OPEN MONDAY-SATt
telephone. FRIDAY EVENINGS
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THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 1978
Daily Calendar
Math: Christer Nordman, "The Phase Problem in
virus Crystallography," 3007 Angell, 3 p.m.
ISMRRD: "Genetic Counseling: Rural Delivery
System,' 139 S. First St., 3 p.m.
Natural Resources: Cynthia Wilson, asst. to the,
secretary, Dept. of the Interior, "National Interest
Lands," 1040 Nat. Res.,3 p.m.
Chemistry: Donald L. Katz, James Westwater, U-
Illinois, "Heat Transfer fromh Fins to Boiling
Liquids," 133 Chrysler Ctr., 3:30 p.m.
'Geology/Mineralogy: Hatten S. Yoder, Jr.,
"Techtonophysics of Melting in the Mantle," 4001
CCL, 4 p.m1.
Math Psy.: Walter Reitman, "Heuristic Look
Ahead in Go," 6006ISR, 4p.m.
CICE: D. P. Taylor, McMaster-U., Ontarion, "A
High Speed Digital Modern for Experimental Work
on the Communications Technology Satellite," 1042
E.Eng.,4 p.m.
. Aerospace: Sam Williams, "Small Gas Turbine
Engine Design and Manufacturing Technology," 107
AEB, 4 p.m.
-Social Work: Edwin M. Lemert, U-California,
Davis, "Alcohol and Social Controls," 3063 Frieze,
7:30p.m.
Guild House: Poetry Reading, Bill and Bob Far-
ier reading their works, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
Chemistry: R. Pettit, U-Texas, "The Development
of Homogeneous Catalysts for the Reduction of Co
with Water in Place of Hydrogen," 1300 Chem., 8
p.m.
Summer Placement
:1)s 5,SAB.763-4117
Camp Sequoia, Mi. Will interview Tues., Apr. 11, 1-
4. Openings include waterfront (WSI), arts/crafts,
SUMMER
WORK
EARN $3000.00
REQUIREMENTS:
1. Whole summer free
2. Relocate from Ann Arbor
area
3. Dependable and hard worker
A l.r.....,. -..

riding (western , archery, riflery.
Crystal Mountain Lodge, Mi. Will audition at the
Michigan Union, Assembly Hall on Weds., April 12 1
p.m.-10 p.m. If you play a horn, bass, guitar or sing
(be part of a combo) register for audition. Phone
(763-4117) or register in person.
IBM, vermont. Offers a summer professional
program for students who have completed their
junior year and beyond in elec. engr. or computer
science. Details and apps. available. Deadline April
14.,
YMCA - Camp Potoeatami, Ind. Opening for trail
leaders. Knowledge in environme tal science -
'iture - biology, etc. Details available.

'rIE MICHIIGAN DAIL'
Volume LXXXVIII, No. 148
Thursday, April 6, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

- U Y -

DON'T TAKE CHANCES WITH
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NOT ALL LAWYER'S ASSISTANT PROGRAMS
ARE THE SAME
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If you are a college graduate and qualify, why not give
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Since the Fall of 1974, 745 graduates representing
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THE
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SESSIONS
Q Spring Day/February 13-May' 5, 1978
E] Spring Evening/March 14-August 26, 1978
Q Summer Day/June 12-September 1, 1978
Q Fall Day/September 25-December 15, 1978
Q Fall Evening/September 12, 1978-March 3,
* evening program only.

1979

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