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April 06, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-06

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Page 2-Thursday, April 6, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Ravitz calls for judicial reform

(Continued from Page 1)
state legislation setting a mandatory
twq-year sentence for possession of a
firearm during a crime.°
He described William Cahalan, the
Wayne County prosecutor who was in-
strumental in passage of the law, as
"treacherous."
Rax.tiz also commented on the com-
petence of trial lawyers. "Justice
Burger said 50 per cent are incom-
petent, didn't he? I say 80 per cent."
RAVITZ, A GRADUATE of the
University of Michigan Law School,
was elected to a 10-year term as Detroit
Recorders Court judge in 1972. Prior to
his election, Ravitz was partner of
radical lawyer Ken Cockrel, who was
recently elected to the Detroit Common
Council.
RAVITZ ARGUED that new
provisions would have to be added to

v v

United States law in order to "breathe
life into the Constitution."
He cited a clause of the Cuban Con-
stitution which he said was "more
valuable and meaningful than all the
law in the United States." The clause
guarantees Cuban citizens health care,
housing and employment.
"I WOULDN'T be here tonight if I
didn't think we had the collective
capacity to build a socialist movement
that will work," he said.
Asked what he was doing to further
this goal, Ravitz replied that a group is
now being reorganized in Detroit
toward this end.
Ravitz opened the lecture by asking
members of the audience whether they
trusted the United States judiciary
system and their eleuted officials. He
received near unanimous negative

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responses to both questions,
He also told of his recent trial in Traf-
fic Court for failing to obey a police of-
ficer. Ravitz tried the case himself and
was acquitted.
House
can't vote
on -%next
canal pact.
t COflt imue( di fromPage I1k
raised b his amendment - whether
disposal of U.S. property requires ap-
proval of both House and Senate.
He also said the vote demonstrated
that the Senate lacks the two-thirds
majority needed to ratify the treaty,
which would turn the canal over to
Panama by the year 2000.
PRO-TREATY forces disagreed.
Assistant Majority Leader Alan Cran-
ston (D-Calif.) said the outcome left
him more confident of victory than he
was at a comparable point during last
month's debate on the treaty guaran-
teeing future neutrality of the canal.
Opponents, whose effort to kill the
neutrality treaty fell two shy of the
required 34 votes, ,had predicted Hat-
ch's motion might attract as many as 45
to 47 supporters.
Cranstonrsaid the amendment, in
falling "far short of that goal," proved
that treaty foes had failed in their
strategy of putting constituent pressure
on certain senators during the Easter
recess in order to win their votes.
BUT AIDES to the anti-treaty faction
noted there were nine senators who
voted for the first treaty who supported
Hatch's amendment - aqd that among
these were at least five who had been
singled out for special attention during
the recess.
They were Sens. Edward Brooke (R-
Mass.); Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.);
Paul Hatfield (D-Mont.); John Heinz
(R-Pa.); and Bob Packwood (R-Ore.).
One anti-treaty strategist said. "We
plan to keep the heat on" those senators
by pointing out that "by backing the
amendment, they expressed a belief
that the treaty is unconstitutional."

Career conference to help
By PAULINE TOOLE organizing workers aron Youngstown, Ohio to purchase
The desire of students to work for social change and and run a steel mill in that city.
Thegeseid not end with the 60s, according to organizers HEATER BOOTH, a longtimne movement organizer,
progress dand director of the Midwest Academy, will give the
of a careers conference this Friday. keynote address at 9 a.m. She will present an overview of
The conference, called "Career Alternatives for Social enoerest9ar. Seil phan
Change," is designed to show University students how modern movemes wgdared to social change.
they can work for change even in traditional job fields. The speakers will discuss the demands their jobs place
BEGINNING AT 9 A.M. in the Residential College, the on personal energies and the "nine-toive" routine of
their lives.
conference will feature workshops on careers in law, "They're going to talk about what keeps them going,
business, media, arts and education. Each workshop will what compromises you need to make in those jobs. The
include speakers now employed in the field. work is something anybody can do," Yeghissian stated.
The goal of the workshops is to show students how both "It just takes commitment and creativity but the sky's the
traditional and non-traditional jobs offer opportunities to limit."
work for positive social change. CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS claim that students
According to Pat Yeghissian of the Office of Student today are interested in making changes, but they are
Services, which is sponsoring the conference, many more willing to go through the traditional
students come to her office seeking information on how to system-working as lawyers, teachers or technicians, but
organize for social change.an e p iic l nd s c a
orgaize or ocia chage.with non-traditional goals in mind.
"STUDENTS COME HERE interested in social change "There is a desire' to balance political and social
work but feel frustrated because they don't know how to motivatios with the realites of the world," Yeghissian
plug in," she said, said. "The question students are addressing ,is, 'How do
Yeghissian and other interested people Around the you support yourself and still make changes?'
University got together and began organizing a conferen- "People are really motivated," added Lisa Mitchell-
ce to show students some of the possibilities available to Yellin, who is also working on the conference. "They're
th searching, and not satisfied with the nine-to-five
thSpeakers include Richard Fernandez who has been lifestyle."

WRCN
FANTASY FLIGHT
KITE-IN
Saturday, April 8

Daily Photo by ALAN BILINSKY
NO CHALKBOARI)S, seats, or desks here. The dance program emphasizes discipline while leaving room for creativity.
Dancers keep n theitrtoes

N11 1 _E

y
" I / 5
. .
__.. '' /
.,x>..

I

'
r. + :, '1
-
_~°

NOON
UNTIL DARK-
Old
Waterman
Gym Site
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT

Plenty of kite flying and kite design
contests with RECORD GIVE-AWAYS

I

1-

t ( ontinued fromP age 1)
master's degree and teach dance at the
university level.
Another senior, Judith Kovach, also
plans to go to the dance mecca to the
east but said that choreography as well
as performance are on her mind.
Freshperson Lisa Taylor hopes to
perform in a musical play like Chorus
Line or in a major modern dance
troupe. "I'm just going to keep on
dreaming 'and auditioning," Taylor
said.
ELIZABETH BERGMANN, Dance
Department chairperson, said dance

The Notre Dame Cultural Arts Commission
Presents The Twentieth Annual
COLLEGIATE,
JAZZ
FESTIVAL
(-U
1978
FEATURING MANY OF THE NATION'S
FINEST COLLEGE JAZZ GROUPS
Friday, April 7 Saturday, April 8
JUDGES: HUBERT LAWS, Flute LARRY RIDLEY, Bass
LEW TABACKIN, Saxophone JOHN LEWIS, Piano
LOUIE BELLSON, Drums DAN MORGENSTERN, Critic

teachers in an academic setting attem-
pt to give students individual attention.,
"You get somebody to care about you
here," Bergmann said, "as well as get-
ting something (a degree) for your
training. I think that anything in the
creative arts has to do with the inside of
a human being.
"If you don't have this environment,
then you stay closed," Bergmann ad-
ded. "When this happens, you are only
teaching the craft."
THE PROGRAM may not be as com-
petitive as in the big city, but Univer-
sity dancers have to endure a rigorous
selection process to get in. In addition
to the regular academic standards, the
Dance Department asks high school
seniors to take a modern dance class
and present a two-minute self-
choreograhed work before a jury of the
department. An- improvisation session
comes next, followed by an interview.
"We're not looking for a finished
product," said ballet instructor
Christopher Flynn, "we're looking for
potential, raw material."
Four years, however, is apparently
not enough time to shape a dancer, so
the Dance Department looks upon its
auditions as a method of taking on
students with pasts garbed in leotards.
"THERE'S SOMETHING about their
We specialize in
ladies's and children's
hairstyling
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e 615 E. Liberty-668-9329
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" 611 E. University-662-0354

energy that goes into the space beyond
their own body," said Bergmann of the
best candidates.
Once they are ushered into the depar-
tment, dancers spend the next four
years preparing themselves to handle
performing, teaching, choreography or
danee criticism.
Senior Beth Corning said she feels
there is too much diversity in the
program, and that the direction of the
department should be better defined.
" Are they training people to perform,
teach or what?," asked Corning. "What
do they expect people to do with their
degrees?"
DANCE PROF. Vera Embroe
responded, "Realistically, most of the
students who are in the performing sec-
tion of our program will also teach,
mainly because you have to make ,a
l vingdoing something."
Prof. Gay Delanghe said teaching
doesn't exclude dancing. "Since it is not
a written work we usually teach the
generation that is coming up by sharing
our work with them. It is an ongoing
cycle of the arts."
Strapped by a tight budget, the Dance
Department hasn't seen a staff in-
crease in 13 years-forcing instructors
to cover many jobs within the depart-
ment, rather than- just teach within
their own area of expertise. Cutting
back on students hasn't eased the strain
since the department still has to
provide a wide spectrum of courses,
regardless of the number of students.
But the new program hides its
troubles under a veneer of spins, jumps
and leaps. A full slate of performances
culminates each year by an April ap-
pearance at the Power Center.

Before it's

too kate

i
r
d
f '"!
Vii.

STEPAN CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

7:30 Friday Night $4.50
12:15 Saturday $2.50
6:30 Saturday Night $4.00

" " "

WEEKEND PASS:
STUDENT $7.50
Non-Student $8.50

Order your
summer subscription
NOW!
Call 764-0558

SEI and MSA Elections
Will e Held the second week of April
We urge all undergraduate and graduate students
.- 1 n 1 f t r i . . _ -- - _- - C - . . I J .

A TTENTION FRESHMEN:
INTERESTED IN THEATRE?
UAC SOPHSHOW Needs You 1 Fill
The Following Positions:

-Director

-Choreographer

I

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