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April 02, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-02

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j' YtJU SEE NEiS KkPPC .L-WDAILY
The whole truth
Now that spring may finally have sprung, the area s golf courses are
filling up. The Professional Golfer's Association recently gave this
warning to novice golfers: "When you play," they said, "be sure to
wear two pair of pants just in case you get a hole-in-one! "
Happenings ...
Some call this the Sabbath, others call it the day of rest, but at Ann
Arbor's Yoga Center on East Ann Street at 1:00 they're calling it
free demonstration time . . . You may have to catch the
rereun at 3:00 or 5:00, because at 1:30 over at East Quad the
Educational Conference for women continues with Margo St. James of
COYOTE speaking for the decriminalization of prostitution . . . If
you'd rather be outdoors, the outing club will be hiking starting at 1:30
from the Huron Street entrance to Rackham auditorium . . . But the
hike should be a short one if you're planning on making the gallery talk
at Kelsey museum, where Tony Hirschel will be telling everything
you always wanted to know about Islamic art in the U-M
collection. . . meanwhile back at East Quad, the prostitution lecture
will be wrapping up just in time for an appearance by Ann Arbor's
candidate-Mayor Albert Wheeler in room 126 at 3:00 p.m. . . . Or if
you're a Lou Belcher fan, you may prefer to skip the Wheeler speech
for the public information programs at the Ann Arbor "Y" - today its
"Preparing your Income Tax" (Oh yes, it's that time of year
again) . . . But for you tax earlybirds, there'll be another "Y"
program at 7:30 on "Self Health", and that one goes until 9:30. . . But
you may have to skip'out early right in the middle of the mouth-to-
mouth resuscitation.to catch the 8:00 p.m. speech by William Sloane
Coffin, Jr. at the First Presbyterian Church, where he will be telling
the world about disarmament and development. . . But if Sinday was
a day of rest as far as happenings.go, you were only resting up for
MONDAY when the real fun begins, starting at noon with the Center
for Near Eastern studies and a speech on primary education in Assiut,
Egypt by Elaine Hess in the Commons Room of Lane Hall.. . But
you'll have to make a choice since also at noon there's the American
Medical association's "Youth, Maturity, Old Age and Death" at the
Med Sci lecture hall. . . And at 4:00, get ready for the big crunch, sin-
ce a deluge of happenings all decided th'at 4:00 was the ideal time.
Okay, here goes nothing, starting with Nottingham University's B. C.
Clark in Auditorium 4 of the MLB speaking on "Morphological and
Molecular evolution", whatever that means.. .and there's the Rev.
Paul Reinhart of St. Louis 'U' giving an update on the financial
stability of higher education at the SEB's Whitney Auditorium. . .Or
there's Metin And of Ankara University speaking at 200 Lane Hall on
"The Central Asian and Anatolian Origins of Turkish Dancing with
Special Reference to the Dance of Sufi Orders" (And that's a mouth-
ful!) . . . At Rackham's East conference room there's Otto Gado
speaking on Hungary's new economic mechanism. . . and with that
you get a breather until the activities pick up again at 5:30 with a
hospitality hour on the second floor concourse of the League to
celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Women's Research club. That's
followed by dinner at 6:15 in the League's Vandenberg room and an
8:00 lecture at Rackham with Art History professor Ilene Forsyth on
"the child in Medieval Art" and an awards ceremony by none other
than the U's main man, Robben Fleming. . . But you can skip out af-
ter you chow down at dinner because you don't want to miss No an-
swers about Rape in MLB's Auditorium 3.. . flicks at the Union con-
ference room include "Rich Man, Poor Mrr" and "Living Off the
Land", and they start at 7:30. . . or if you've seen those two, try East
Quad at 7:30 and their "Panther Panchali" in room 126. . . Then at
8:00 another onslaught begins; There's K. Helveg Peterson speaking
on Danish society in lecture room 2 of the MLB . . . and the Women's
studies group has Florence Luscomb's personal reflections of the suf-
ferage movement (and she's.seen it for 80 years!) ... Thomas Taylor
will be at the Stearns Building telling us everything you always wan-
ted to know, and probably more than you care to, about Early music at
the Stearns collection. . . And to cap it off there's the film "The Well-
digger's daughter" in Auditorium A of Angell at 9:10 only ... Well,
that's a mouthful, and it's enough to keep you busy at least'until
Tuesday when we start all over again.
On the outside ...-
Bear with us for a little more wintry weather, as the high today will
be about 43 degrees. Skies will be clear to partly cloudy with moderate
winds from the south. Rain is predicted for Monday with a high tem-
perature of 46 degrees. For Tuesday, the outlook is bleak with more
rain, and a high of 55 degrees.

The Michigan-Daily-Sunday, April 2, 1978-Page 3
City bus service a real adventure

r

By PAULA LASHINSKY
Take a purple van downtown, then
pass go and get on the first bus in line,
ride to Fourth and Williams and change
buses for the last time.
No, these aren't instructions for a
treasure hunt, just the steps one might
have to follow to take the Ann Arbor
Transportation Authority (AATA) from
one spot to another.
Public transportation users are very
familiar with this combination of
demand-response Dial-a-Ride vans and
main-line buses. Riders can reserve
vans for short-haul trips, but whenever
possible dial-a-ride coordinators design
a combination trip for the rider.
THE DIAL-A-RIDE demand activated
system, which began in 1972, reached its
full implementation level in 1976. The
AATA Board is now trying to determine
whether the concept of telephoned bus
service can co-exist with a main line
system with some degree of productivity
and reliability. Many people doubt this
assertion, among them Republican
mayoral candidate Louis Belcher.
"Riding the AATA is a real adven-
ture, like going to Disney World,"
Belcher said.
RIdes must be booked 45 minutes in
advance, but to make the proper con-
nections riders often have to begin their

travels an hour or more before they
hope to reach their destinations.
BELCHER SEES great deficiencies
in the present transportation system.
He said that Dial-a-Ride is ineffective
and advocates the instigation of more
main-line routes that would stick to a
rigid schedule. Most important,
Belcher said, is the appointment of a
reliable individual to the AATA Board.
"What we need is someone who is
going to probe, someone who will truly
question the system," Belcher said.
The AATA Board is an autonomous
body controlled by the authority. Ap-
pointments are made by the mayor
with the city council's approval, but the
board does not report directly back to
the Council. Because of this
arrangement the Council has little con-
trol over AATA programs, Mayor
Albert Wheeler said.
"THE BOARD is autonomous; other
than persuasion, the only way we can
act is by firing the whole board," said
Wheeler.
The Board itself is a powerful body
and is responsible for new programs.
The Citizens Committee on transpor-
tation blames a weak board for the
problems within the system.
"The basic problem is the indifferen-

ce of the Board," said Stuart Laidlow,
chairman of the Citizen's Committee.
"The people on the board don't seem to
want to spend the time that is necessary
to understand and truly address the
problems."
THE COMMITTEE strongly ap-
proves the appointment of Joel Samoff
as chairman of the board. Samoff was
Belcher's suggestion; but Wheeler did
not concur with this choice.
"Joel Samoff is one of the few people
who can discuss the views in an in-
telligent manner," said Laidlow.
The AATA is one of the richest tran-
sportation authorities in the state yet it
is questionable as to where the funds
are going. Last year the AATA spent
four million dollars to accommodate
two million riders.
Belcher advocates many new
programs. He has spoken in favor of a

main-line bus system that would stick
to rigid schedules. He also supports the
idea of a central area circular bus
which would serve to connect downtown
employment, shopping, parking and en-
tertainment. He said that possible cuts.
should be make in the Dial-a-Ride
system to carry out these plans.
"OUR GOAL should be the most
viable transportation system possible
with the money we have. We should
strive for the system that will best ser-
ve the largest population," . Belcher
said.
During last year's mayoral campaign
Wheeler promised not to disband the
Dial-a-Hide system. He still sticks by
that pledge this year.
"There are serious problems with our
transportation system," Wheeler said,
"but Dial-a-Ride should not be
eliminated."

DAVID LEAN'S

1962

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
This bold compelling biography of a British soldier of fortune
who goes off to become a leader of Arab Tribesmen during
World War I stars PETER O'TOOLE. Also featuring OMAR
SHARIF and ALEC GUINESS. Expansive, Electrifying and in
Cinemascope.
TUES: DR. STRANGELOVE

/

S... ..................
Daily Off ic ial Bulletin

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
6:30 & 10:00

OLD ARCH. AUD.
. $1.50

Sunday, April 2, 1978
Daily Calendar
Kelsey Museum: Gallery talk, Tony Mirschel,
"Islamic Art in the U-M Collections," Kelsey, 2
p.m.
Music School: Mozart's Opera, "The Magic.
Flute," Power Center, 8p.m.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 S. A.B.
INTERNSHIPS AT THE ROCHESTER MUSEUM
AND THE STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM for
individuals interested in the theory and practice of
museum and planetarium operations.
Post-Doctoral Teaching Awards in Humanities and
thq Professions for junior faculty in the humanities
with interest in teaching and research related to pre-
professional education in medicine, law,
engineering, and business. One year appointments,
beginning Sept. 1978.
Japanese American Citizens League National
Scholarship Program for 1978 offers 15 Freshman
and 4 Graduate student scholarships ranging from
$250 to $1,000.
H V KALTENBORN Scholarship in Radio-
Television will provide a $1,600 graduate scholarship
at the University of Wisconsin for 1978-79 school
year.
CHICAGO COLLEGE CAREER CONFERENCE
on April 21-22 at the Holiday Inn-O'Hare Kennedy.
Students are invited to attend at no cost.
Additional information available at Career Plan-
ning & Placement.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 S. A.B.-763-4117
interviews; register by phone or in person.
Please note correction-Oak Park Recreation
WILL INTERVIEW here on Mon., Apr. 3 from 3 to 5.
Openings are for counselors for day camp,
playground and tots.
Camp Tamarack, Det. Fresh Air Society. Will in-
terview Tues., Apr. 4 from 9 to 5. Openings for coun-
selors, specialists, nurse, long trip bus driver, kit-
chen staff.
Camp Sequoia, New York Coed. Will interview
Wed., Apr. 5 from 9 to 5. Openings include drama.
crafts, head supervisor, riding (Eng. , photo., ham
radio, tennis, gymnastics.
Sunday,April 2, 1978
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Herman Miller, zeeland, Mi. (near Holland)
Opening for marketing analysis (master's degree).
Research on furniture sales and research program
on characteristics of past clients. Details available.
Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Mi. Opening for
medical students in their second or third year of
study. Details available.
,MA II
AY. APRIL 4
XY MAN!
SAY ANDERSON (1973)
picturesque tale of an ambitious young
s into a movie before your very eyes.
rick's A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, but lots
nt music by Alan Price and his band who
ers in the story. An outrageous film and
ason to live and not die you are a lucky
MLB 3 $1.50
chcock's REBECCA

Midland Macromolecular Institue, Midland, Mi.
Summer fellowship in biomedical research. Must
have at least two years of chemistry (including
organic) and biology. Further details available.
Deadline April30.
Monday, April 3, 1978
Daily Calendar
Ctr. Near Eastern/N. African Stuidies: Elaine
Hess, "Primary Education in Assiut, Egupt," Com-
mons rm., Lane,. noon.
Physics/Astronomy: F. Mills, FNAL, "Electron
Cooling of Antiprotons and p-p Colliding Beams,'
2038 Randall; J. Lattimer, U-Illinois, "Hot Dense
Matter in Super Novae," 807 Dennison, 4Dp.m.
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology: B. C. Clarke.
U-Nottingham, "Morphological and Molecular
Evolution: Do They Obey the Same Rules?", Aud. 4,
MLB, 4 p.m.
Ctr. Study of Higher Education/School of Ed:
Rev. Paul C. Reinert,. chancellor,. St. Louis-U..
"Reflections on 'To Turn the Tide'; An Update on the
Financial Stability of Private Higher Education,"
Whitney Aud., SEB, 4 p.m.
Ctr. Near Eastern/N. African Studies: Metin And,
Ankara-U., "The Central Asian and Anatolian
Origins of Turkish Dancing with Special Reference
to Dancing of Sufi Orders," 200 Lane, 4 pm.
Ctr. Russian/E. European Studies: Otto Gado,
"The New Economic Mechanism in Hungary, Ex-
perience and Future Prospects," E. Conf.,
Rackham, 4 p.m.
Ctr. Western European Studies: K. Helveg Peter-
son, former Danish Minister of Education.
"Cultural, Social and Political Aspects of Danish
Society: Trends in Nordic Cooperation," Lec. rm. 2.
MLB, 8p.m.
Women's Studies: Florence Luscomb, "Personal
Recollections of the Sufferage Movement." W. Conf.
rm., Rackham, 8p.m.

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
THE GONDOLIERS
April 12-15, 1978
Mendelssohn Theatre, Michigan League
University of Michigan

PERFORMANCES:
Wednesday, April 12 at 8 p.m. @ $3.50
Thursday, April 13 at 8 p.m. @ $3.50
Friday, April 14 at 8 p.m. @ $4.00
Saturday, April 15 at 2 p.m.@ $3.50
Saturday, April 15 at 8 p.m.@ $4.00)

Extremely limited
tickets available

FOR TICKET INFORMATION BEFORE APR. 9,
994-0221: AFTER APR. 9. 763-1085

~JjCIVE SIY /IUSICAL %OCIETY presen t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIlI,.No. 145
Sunday, April 2, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann /Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

CINE
TUESDI
0OLUCI
Director-LINDS
Malcolm MacDowell stars in this
coffee salesman whose life turn
Reminiscent in many ways of Kub
more irreverant and fun. Exceller
manage to become active charact
a cult classic. "If you've got a re
man...
7 9:45 PM
FRIDAY: Hitc

There's
a solution but...
Birth
defects
are
forever.
a Unless
you help.
March
of Dimes

1

1110h, , 1- ow

Fr

t
,.
i

CINEMA II
Sunday, April 2
THE MILKY WAY
Director-LUIS BUNUEL (1972)
The film depicts the surreal odyssey of two vagabonds who travel
through history witnessing and participating in a series of great moral and
religious controversies. At each step. Bunuel probes deeply, reiterating
questions that have troubled Roman Catholics through the ages, exposing
hypocrisy, and challenging church dogma that contradicts human nature.
Paul Frankeur, Lauren Terzieff. Spanish, with subtitles.
7 & 9 AngelliHall- Aud A $1.50
TUESDAY: Anderson's 0 LUCKY MAN!

THE HSEAGULL
by ANTON CHEKHOV

PRESENTED BY
THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE PLAYERS
APRIL 6, 78 8 PM
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION $2.50
Tickets Available
Michigan Union Box Office 763-2071

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