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April 02, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-02

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Page 2-Sunday, April 2, 1978-The Michigan Daily

3500 invade Diag Hash Bash

(Continued from Page 1)
ticipants were still a bit reluctant to
pull out any weed. Cries of "What kind
of freaks are you - a hash bash with no
hash!" were common. "Hey, officer,"
said one pot smoker to a policeman, "do
you see any hippies here?" The officer
replied with a giggle, "not really."
IT TOOK A long series of citations
and arrests and the ever-growing
crowd to break the ice; but by 3:00, the
smell of cannibus sativa was pungently
in the air to stay. Musicians played for
whoever would listen in all the areas
surrounding the Diag. A pair of young
fencers clashed. Jugglers, cycle gangs,
and an "orater" in the style of Dr. Diag
all roamed the crowd, which peaked at
4:30.
But dope wasn't the only reason
people amassed on the Diag. Perhaps
as prominent at the celebration was
alcohol, and although such drugs as
LSD and cocaine were not as visible as
they used to be, they still could be
found. Many who were on the Diag were
also observing, often gaping in

disbelief.
"I am not believing this," said Matt
Marquardt, a freshman from Texas.
"They don't have nothing like this at
home. The goat ropers wouldn't let this
last five minutes."
The winds picked up by 6:00, making
it much colder for the crowd, which
began thinning out.
"We're pretty grateful that it got cold
so fast," one officer said. As darkness
fell, a clean-up crew had started
picking up the thousands of cans. By
9:00, the Diag was virtually empty.
NEW YORK (AP) - The fifth in a
series of Metropolitan Opera historic
broadcasting recordings will soon be
released featuring Lotte Lehman as the
Marschallin in Richard Strauss' "Der
Rosenkavalier."
Anthony A. Bliss, executive director,
said the recording, taken from the Jan.
7, 1939, radio broadcast, included a cast
of Rise Stevens as Octavian, Em-
manuel List as Baron Ochs, Marita
Farrell as Sophie and Friederich
Schorr as Von Faninal.

Study says marijuana cousin theraputic

oily Photos by PETER SERLING
"TO EACH HIS OWN," the old saying goes, and these two phots show that every-
one had his or her own way of enjoyng yesterday's Hash Bash.
Michigan Daily Clasifieds
Bring Results !I-Call 764-0557

" That leases accurately reflect the
legal rights of tenants
* That tenants get complete information
about their rights and duties.

HOUSTON (AP)-A new study shows
that a synthetic chemical cousin to
marijuana is effective against the
devastating side effects of severe
nausea and vomiting that frequently
result from chemical cancer therapy.
Human tests at the Indiana Univer-
sity Medical Center in Indianapolis in-
dicate a new drug-Nabilone -is
superior to Compazine, one of the prin-
cipal drugs used to control
chemotherapy-induced sickness,
researchers reported yesterday.
THE NAUSEA AND vomiting
associated with therapy is far more
serious than a common upset stomach.
Doctors say it can become so severe
that some patients refuse further
therapy that might save their lives.
Past studies show that marijuana and
its principal active ingredient-tetra-
hydromcannabinol, nicknamed THO-
are effective anti-nausea agents.
Federal health authorities at the
request of President Carter recently
The largest king crab ever mea-
sured weighed nearly 25 pounds and
was five feet across, including its
legs, reports National Geographic.
MAYOR
WHEELER
will be speaking
Sunday, April 2, 1978
3:00 p.m.
East Quad - Room 126
ABENG/E.Q.

began re-evaluating the illegal plant to
see if it might be allowed for medical
uses such as this.
But the plant and even synthetically
made THO can cause abnormally rapid
heartbeats, extreme euphoria and
other effects doctors want to minimize.
SPEAKING HERE at the American
Cancer Society's annual science
writers' seminar, Becky Furnas said
the experimental drug Nabilone is not a

synthetic THO although it has a similar
molecular structure. Nabilone,.
produced by Eli Lilly & Co. of In-
dianapolis, does not cause rapid heart
rate and is much less euphoric than
THO, said Furnas, a nurse specializing
in cancer treatment.
"The chemistry is manipulated to
enhance certain effects and reduce
others," she said.
In the study by Furnas, nurse

AFSCME, hospital still arguing

' .!h~h

Paid for by the Coalition for Better Housing/Ballot Question Comittee, Greg Hesterberg, Treasurer
CHOOSING A COLLEGE MAJOR?
CHOOSING A CAREER?
CAREER SATISFACTION LATER
requires careful planning and
evaluation NOW.
Knowing your natural abilities can
help you make the right decisions.
If you are considering choices that will affect your career future, tin
ASSESSMENT OF APTITUDES is a useful first phase in your planning. It
can provide you with the criteria necessary for making EDUCATIONAL
PlANS, CAREER DECISIONS, and LIFE GOALS.
JOHNSON O'CONNER RESEARCH FOUNDATION
HUMAN ENGINEERING LAORATORY
a non-profit organization conductingF
aptitude measurement since 1922

Catherine Nagy and Dr. Lawrence
Einhorn, the researchers evaluated the
reaction of 47 cancer patients receiving
intravenous multi-drug chemotherapy.
Each cycle ran for about five days
with patients getting an anti-nausea
drug a half hour prior to daily doses of
chemicals.
Those desiring more relief could get
more anti-nausea drugs between
sessions.

(Continued from Page 1)
anonymous) and housekeeping super-
visor Al Schaheen. Schaheen was
unavailable for comment.
TTHE CUSTODIAN, who was fired
last Tuesday by Schaheen, said he
wasn't given any official reason for his
termination, but he believes it was
because he told two other supervisors
how he felt about Schaheen.
The employee later told the two
supervisors that "if I was a labor
steward, I would make a thorough
anecdotal record of his (Schaheen's)
negative, overbearing, derogatory,
dehumanizing, and superior attitude
actions, and, in short, I would rack his
ass."
The worker said he was "treated like
a small child" Monday while being
reprimanded for leaving some dust
behind the bed of a young patient.
THE CUSTOIDIAN said another
reason for his discharge was his com-
passion and sympathy for a dying
leukemia patient.
"He (Schaheen) said that if a worker
in a hospital is disturbed a great deal by
dying patients he shouldn't work

there," the custodian said.
"This display of compassion was
done mainly after my work period was
over," he said. "My compassion and
sympathy is not confined to one patient
but to all patients of the University
Hospital."
THOUGH THE custodian is not a
present member of the union, Newman
said he intends to work to help the
worker. Newman said he will talk both
to University President Robben
Fleming and Vice-President James
Brinkerhoff about the matter within a
few days. Neither Fleming or
Brinkerhoff have been informed of the
situation.
"The very first time something hap-
pens like this some action must be
taken," Newman said.

THough the local president did not
say whether this particular incident
could spur a strike, he did say "that it is
the exact type of thing that would."
The custodian has mixed feelings
about his case being presented to
Fleming.
"I THINK this (his firing) is a very
minor incident," the worker said. "I
am afraid it will blow up and dissipate
into a major labor discord. I believe it
may even become the incident to
initiate a strike which may occur in not
too long."
"The union must prevail in this unfor-
tunate incident ;or its position in this
hospital will be vastly weakened," he
added. "If it gets rid of Al Schaheen I
say 'let it go.' That person should be a
trash-and-mopper."

Carter endorses
black majority rule

For brochure, write or col:
Johnson O.Conner Research Foundation
47 East Adams Street
Detroit, Michigan 48226
(313j963-9185
Atlanta Chicago Fort Worth
Boston Detroit

Los Angeles
Houston

Son Diego
New York

Washington
Tulsa

Cappaert
FOURTH WARD DEMOCRAT
CAPPAERON TE ISSUES
* "THE CITY MUST ENCOURAGE AN INCREASE IN THE
SUPPLY OF HOUSING, PARTICULARLY IN THE MODERATE
PRICE RANGE."
" "I SUPPORT WHOLEHEARTEDLY BOTH TENANTS RIGHTS
BALLOT PROPOSALS."
" "OUR LOCAL GOVERNMENT SHOULD PUT A GREATER.
EMPHASIS ON HUMAN SERVICES, SUCH AS HEALTH
CARE, DAY-CARE, AND JOB TRAINING SERVICES."
" "OUR ROADS NEED FIXING IN A WELL-PLANNED MAN-
NER THAT WILL MAINTAIN THEM IN THE FUTURE."
" "WE MUST CAREFULLY MONITOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL

-PIRGIMfound that 95 % of
leases contain illegal clauses
The Solution
-Outlaw misleading leases
YES ON A&B

(Continued from Page 1)
of U.N. resolutions calling for full in-
dependence. The United States,
Britain, France, West Germany and
Canada are pushing for one-man, one-
vote elections under U.N. auspices to
assure Namibia's independence.
ON RHODESIA, he said, "Great
Britain and the United States have put

forward a plan for a solution based on
three fundamental principles."
" Free and fair elections.
" An irreversible transition to
genuine majority rule and independen-
ce.
* Respect for the individual rights of
all citizens of an independent Zimbab-
we, the nationalist name for Rhodesia.
"This plan provides the best basis for
agreement. It is widely supported
within the international community and
by presidents of the frontline nations
bordering Rhodesia," Carter said.
"Its principle must be honored. Let
there be no question of our commitment
to these principles or our determination
to pursue a just settlement which
brings a cease-fire and an inter-
nationally recognized legal goverment."

Paid for by the Coalition for Better Housing/
B Q C Greg Hesterberg, Treasurer

Congratulations Graduating Nurses
With graduation just around the corner, you have several important decisions to make. Most impor-
tantly, which hospital will provide the greatest opportunities for your nursing career? We understand
your concern and offer:

* EXPERIENCE
Career mobility to any of our 34 units.
A closed-staff hospital providing immediate inter-
action with the medical staff.
An environment geared to the encouragement and
acceptance of new ideas, allowing development of
one's full range of skills.
* EDUCATION
An outstanding individualized in-service orientation,
tailored to your own needs and pace.

* SALARY AND FRINGE BENEFITS
A highly competitive salary.
A full dental insurance plan.
Maternity leave disability income protection.
Blue Cross/Blue Shield Master Medical for the entire family.
Vacation cash bonus-something extra to help you enjoy your vacation.
And more.. .

Inservice education programs designed to keep you
informed of the most current nursing developments.

I i

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