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March 30, 1978 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1978-03-30

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Drums, dances,

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 30, 1978-Page 3.
crafts replace

J Ir YOUSEE tW&4S MVM 14CAJL ZDAJtY
Happenings.. .
sleep i i until 10, then listen to Fourth Ward City Council candidates
air their views over WIQB, 103 FM ... Piero Sanavio will discuss "Con-
temporary Ialian Politics" at noon in 5208 Angell Hall ... the Clio award-
winning commercials will be shown from 11-12:30 in Room 140 Bus Ad ...
the American Medical Student Association will present three films at
noon in the outh Lecture Hall of Med Sci II, third floor ... bring your lun-
ch and head over to the Pendleton Information Center, second floor of the
Union, for "The Building of a Dance," a preview of a dance company
concert ... the Math Dept. Colloquium explores "A Theorem and a
Question Related to Cohomological Dimension" at 3 in room 4008 Angell
Hall ... Penn State University Prof. Lushman Yapa discusses "The
Potential Surplus in Poor Countries". at 4 in room 4050 LSA ... Italian
journalist and professor Piero Sanavio will talk about modern Italian
poetry in the West Conference Room of the Rackham Building at 4 ...
health anq safety of pre-school children will be the topic of Susan Aron-
son's 4 o'clock lecture at Schorling Auditorium, School of Education ...
Carol Meyers will speak on "Woman in the Bible: The Real and the Idea"
at 4 in Lecture Room 2, MLB ... Conne Terove will tell men and women
how to dress for success at 6 in room 229 West Engineering ... People for
Otterbacher will hold its first meeting at 7 in the UGLI Multi-purpose
Room, third floor ... at 7:30, there will be a Poetry reading at Guild
House, 802 Monroe, with Ann Allen, Jacqueline Mooer and Amy Ronner.
Donald Pelz and Robert Zucker will discuss "Alcohol and Adolescents" at
7:30 in 3063 Frieze ... Margo St. James of COYOTE will speak on
"Decriminalization of Prostitution" in the Law Club Lounge at 8 ... the
University Jazz Band will perform a free concert under the direction of
Lou Smith at 8 in Rackham Auditorium ... finally, a reminder that Pi
Sigma Alpha, a national political science honor society, is accepting ap-
plications for membership now through April 5 in 6618 Haven Hall ... It's
almost Friday ..
Rhyne and reason
Hackensack, N.J. Superior Court Judge Harvey Smith recently had
quite altime wading through the law books to come up with a decision
declaring the complicated rent control laws in Fort Lee, N.J. invalid.
Exasperated, he decided to make his views clear in a little metered foot-
note which he added to his weighty, 42-page ruling:
"Accounting procedures make facts hard to find
Figures are extrapolated, projected, refined
Depreciation doubled, depletion straight-lined
The boggle the books and joggle the mind."
So much for poetic justice.
Clippity-clap
Too much horsing around has caused such an outbreak of venereal
disease among Kentucky thoroughbreds that State Agriculture Com-
missioner Thomas Harris has ordered breeding farms with infected hor-
ses to use artificial insemination. Distraught breeders have brought the
problem before the New York Jockey Club, which registers all thorough-
breds, in search of an answer. The club will meet Monday to decide
whether to endorse or condemn the artificial insemination which could
cause a segment of Kentucky's multi-million dollar breeding industry to
shut down. Actually, we think the plan might do a lot to control the horses'
race.y-y lifestyles.
On the outside . .
First, the bad news: we can expect partly cloudy skies with in-
creasing cloudiness in the afternoon and southwesterly winds. Now the
good news: the high should reach a scorching 53*. Expect a low tonight of
400 with cloudy skies and a very slight chance of rain. Keep your fingers
crossed - we could hit 600 tomorrow under partly cloudy skies.

baseball, hot dogs and apple pie

By ELISA ISAACSON
It's not yet green and balmy enough
for the traditional American hot dog,
potato chips and lemonade picnic, but
the Ann Arbor Annual Powwow this
weekend will provide a variation of this
established community get-together.
The powwow, whose roots extend well
before those of the American family
picnic, will be the seventh of its kind in

expected ten drums and three hundred
dancers this year," said Jim Concan-
non, one of the coordinators of the
powwow.
THE MUSIC AND DANCE contests.
will be the major atraction at the event,
but many artisans will also display and
sell their crafts.
According to Goeman, the powwow is

AMONG THE thirty to fifty tribes
will be represented this weekend, the
major local tribes will be the Chippewa,
the Potawatomi and the Ottawa.
"There's a large mixture, because
Detroit is such a large industrial area,"
said Goeman.
A dancer herself, Goeman said of the
powwows, "We really enjoy them,
because they givedus the opportunity
not only to do our dances, but to learn
new ones."
The leather and beadwork costumes
take "A lot of time to get together" and

are "hard to replace." "Most people do
*hot realize the expense and time that
goes into it," said Goeman. She said one
pair of beaded moccasins would cost
about $45.
Concannon said the purpose of the
Ann Arbor powwow is to "sensitize
local, University, and statewide com-
munities to Native American culture.
But beyond that, it is designed to
provide an arena for Native Americans
to exchange ideas, problems and goals
and to sustain their solidarity through a
traditional cultural celebration."
Proceeds from the powwow will be
used to establish a local center for
Native Americans.

"The purpose of the powwow is to 'sensitize local,
University, and statewide communities to Native
American culture. But beyond that, it is designed to
provide an arena for -Natire Americans to exchange

ideas, problems and

goals

and to sustain their

s olida rit y
celebration.

th rough
, ,,

a traditional

cuIturaI

- Jim Con car ion,
Powwow co-ordinator

.. ::.}::.v.i.:."::.v

Ann Arbor. The festival will begin on
Saturday at Huron High School.
According to Dorothy Goeman, the
University's Minority Student Services
Native American Representative, the
event is "basically just to get people
together."
"IT'S A CULTURAL exchange,"-said
Goeman. "People are trying to re-
establish old traditions and learn new
things about other tribes." Comparing
the powwow to an "annual picnic".
Goeman pointed out "you might see
someone you hadn't seen for a whole
year."
The Ann Arbor Annual Powwow,
sponsored by the University's Native
American Student Association and the
Ann Arbor Native American Culture
School, has expanded greatly in the last
seven years.
"The powwow has grown from one
drum and thirty dancers in 1972 to an
Daily Official Bulletin
THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 1978
Daily Calendar:
MHRI: Theodore X. Barber, Medfield Foundation,
Inc., "Clinical and Research Applications of the
'New' Hypnosis," 1057 MHRI, 3:15 p.m.
Geology/Mineralogy: Francis R. Boyd,
Geophisical Lab., Carnegie Institute of Washington,
D.C., "Dimberlines and Mantle Sample," 4001 CCL, 4
p.m.
Math/Psy: J. E. Keith Smity, "Heterogeneous
Cogingency Tables", 6006 ISR, 4p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: H. Tye, Fermi National Ac-
celerator Lab., "Phenomenology of Higglets," 2038
Randall Lab., 4p.m.
Guild House: Poetry Reading: Ann Allen,
Jacqueline Moore, and Amy Robber, reading their
works, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
Social Work: Donald C. Pelz, Robert Zucker,
"Alcohol and Adolescents," 3063 Frieze, 7:30 p.m.
Law School: Margo St. James, "Decriminalization
of Prostitution," Law Club Lounge, 8 p.m.

There's
a solution but .. .
are
forever.
Unless
you help.
of Timnes

the largest in the state. "I go to all the
powwows, she said, but added that at
the Ann Arbor powwow "there's a
much larger variety of tribal people
represented."
Dancers from ten states and Canada
will perform at the festival. Goeman
estimated one-third of the participants
come directly from reservations and
the rest from cities.

t
i

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
presents at ANGELL HALL
Thursday, March 30
SHAME
(Ingmar Bergman, 1969) & 9-AUD A
War disrupts the lives of two musicians on their island home. This film
chronicles the growing rift between Jan Rosenburg with unheroic determina-
tion to remain olive and his wife Eva as she maintains her humanity and
strength. Described by one critic as a document just before extinction,
SHAME is the third part of a trilogy which includes HOUR OF THE WOLF and
PERSONA. Liv Ullman, Max von Sydow. In Swedish with subtitles.
Plus Short: DE DUVA (THE DOVE) (George Coe and Anthony Lover, 1968).
A wild lampoon of WILD STRAWBERRIES, THE SEVENTH SEAL, and THE SILENCE.
Bergman, of course, will survive, but still the short is a lot of fun. Sitting in an
outhouse, an aging professor recalls his incestuous love for his sister and
her badmitton game with Death. in pidgon Swedish, with subtitles, "All dem
peoples bin feelin my presenko zooner or latska,"-Death.
Friday: THE TALL BLONDE MAN WITH ONE BLACK SHOE & THE WRONG BOX

r

L

FINAL CUT IN PRICESI
On Many Items in Our Store for the
LAST 3 DAYS
OF OUR REMODELING AND EXPANSION SALE
THURDSDAY-FRIDAY-SATURDAY
EVERYTHING FOR THE MAN

L-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No. 142
Thursday, March 30, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sundaymorning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Poetry Reading
with
ANN ALLEN, JAQUELYN MOORE
and AMY RONNER
reading from their works
Thursday, March 30-7:30
at GUILD HOUSE
Refreshments 802 MONROE (corner of Oakland)

I

- -- ANN ARBOR E. LANSING
Fine Quality Men's & Young Men's Clothing, Furnishings and

Sportswear

oner

LOCATED AT
310S. STATE ST.
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
great X300,00 Remodeling
Expansion Sale
SALE BEGINS TODAY, THURSDAY MORNING AT 9:00 O'CLOCK
STORE HOURS: Thursday and Friday 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.-Saturday 9 A.M. to 5:30

of

r shrimp

be,

To $14500
SUITS
Out of a group
-while these
last-famous#
name brands,
latest styles,
fabrics, at

To $1900
Casual Slacks

l3fo

Good selection,
latest styles,
colors, fabrics
-famous
names, out
of a group

t13 88

To $2000
Denim Jeans &
Corduroy Pants
Famous brands
best and latest
styles-out of
a large group,
to sell at

ALL SALES FINAL-ALL ITEMS ADVERTISED SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE

When you order our shrimp dinner, you get no less than
14 delicious shrimp, each one deep fried and served with our
elaborate salad bar, Hearthstone toast, and butter. After all,
we don't skimp on our shrimp.
CHOICE
DQESS NG

To $12500
SPORT COATS
Out of a group,
latest styles,
colors fabrics.
Famous brands
at

I I

To $1600
DRESS SHIRTS

Hurry! Out of
a group-
latest styles,
collars, colors,
to sell at only.

F618
2 FOR $1200

To $3000
SWEATERS
While these last
-out of a
group. Good ti10
styles, colors,
famous makers
at

I

I

m

DONl'T MIS THESE TERRIFIC BARGAINS

m

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