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March 23, 1978 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-23

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 23, 1978--Page 5

RUTGERS PR OF BLASTS U.S. MEDIA:

Allende:

Victim of bad

By RENE BECKER
Salvador Allende, the socialist
president of Chile who was
assassinated in the 1973 coup, was the
target of slanted U.S. press coverage
which gave Americans a false im-
pression of the man and events in Chile
while he was president, according to
John Pollack, a political science
professor at Rutgers University.
Speaking before about 40 people in
Angell Hall yesterday, Pollack said the
American press "assumed that the
Allende government was some kind of
enemy," merely because he was a
socialist.
POLLACK, who has studied the effec-
ts of media on national opinion and
government decision-making, singled
out The New York Times as being "in
some ways, the worst offender."
More specifically, Pollack pointed to
an article appearing in The New York
Time Magazine in which reporter Juan
de Onis wrote: "Extremists have
already produced two major crises sin-
ce Allende was elected."
Pollack said de Onis' words might
lead the reader to lgelieve that the elec-
tion of Allende caused the crises.
ACCORDING to de Onis' article, the
crises were "the assassination of
General Schnieder (the chief of staff of
the Chilean Army) and, nine months
later, the assassination by left-wing

terrorists of Edmundo Perez Zukovic,
who had been Minister of the Interior
under former President Frei."
Pollack said Schneider had been
killed by right-wing forces opposing
Allende. He noted that according to de
Onis, "Right-wing assassins are simply
assassins; those from the Left are left-
wing terrorists."
The Times, Pollack claims, along
with The Washington Post, The Los
Angeles Times, The Wall Street Jour-
nal, and other papers that extensively
cover foreign events, generally inter-
views those on the political right about
"dangerous left-wing terrorists" but
rarely interviews leftists about
"dangerous rightists."
"MOST INTERVIEWS were held
with upper and middle class people"
said Pollack. "Seldom were opinions
solicited from those who would most
likely support Allende," including.
union officials, factory workers and the
unemployed.
But Pollack was most disturbed
about what American nedwsmen leave
out of their stories.
The American press omits much in-
formation essential to balanced ar-
ticles, according to Pollack. An
especially flagrant example of this,
said Pollack, was American coverage
of a 1971, anti-Allende street rally in the
Chilean capital of Santiago.

POLLACK SAID the U.S. press did
not report, as did the European news
services, that the majority of the
protestors were upper middle or upper
class - "not exactly Allende's biggest
fans."
According to Pollack: "Seventy to
eighty per cent of all foreign news we
receive in the United States comes from
the Associated Press (AP)," a wire
news service which most U.S.
newspapers subscribe to.
Not only are the wire services for-
ming U.S. opinion about South
America, he said, but they are also
forming the opinion South Americans
have of themselves, said Pollack.
Latin American countries do not have
their own wire services so they sub-
scribe to AP, said Pollack. All AP
stories coming from Latin America
must go through the New York
headquarters before being sent back to
Latin America.
As a result, Pollack said, although 15
per cent of the news from South
America is about violence, 25 per cent

press
of the South American news sent back
from New York is about violence.
Stud
in Itay
Next Fall
Barbieri Center/Rome Campus
Sponsored By
TRINITY COLLEGE,
Office of Educational Services
Hartford, Conn. 06106
Art
History
Literature
Art History
Sept. 7 - Dec. 15
Application Deadline: April 14

Daily rMa iy VVY.t C.AULt
John Pollack, a professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, tells a group
6f students in Angell Hall about the inaccuracies he says the American press com-
mitted during President Salvador Allende's reign in Chile.
EASTLAND RETIRING:
Kennedy is heir
to Judiciary post
WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen. James mittee, although he added he won't
Eastland, the Mississippi Democrat agree with what he does.
who has been chairman of the Senate
Judiciary Committee for a record 22 THE TWO are poles apart on gun con-
years, announced yesterday he will trol, immigration, antitrust and many
retire in January at the end of his of the other legislative issues handled
present term. by the judiciary panel.
The 73-year-old plantation owner, For years under Eastland's leader-
who first came to the Senate in 1941, ship, the committee was a conservative
became a symbol of the Old South bastion irY the Senate. The landmark
segregationist during the long and bit- civil rights bills of the 1960s} won
ter Senate battles over civil rights passage only through parliamentary
legislation. maneuvering that bypassed the com-
HIS RETIREMENT will leave only mittee.
his- Mississippi colleague, Sen. John In the last few years, Eastland
Stennis, chairman of the Armed Ser- seemed to rule by benign neglect,
vices Committee, among the old-time rarely taking as active a role as he did

I

RARE OPPORTUNITY FOR OUTDOORSMAN,
CAMPER, BACKPACKER, FISHERMAN,
offered to student free to travel starting in June on 8 to 10
week minimum trip in Pick-up Camper to Seattle via Yellow-
stone and Tetons.
At Seattle we board ship with camper and travel Inland
Passage, with stop enroute, to Shagway and on to Fair-
banks and down Alaskan Highway. Only clothing and person-
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Write, in brief, personal information including outdoor
interests and camping experiences if any. Include phone num-
ber. Wile call for meeting and more detailed plans. Reply
Box 13 Michigan Daily.
GRADUATE STUDY
IN URBAN
PLANNING AND
POLICY ANALYSIS
SGRADUATE STUDY IN URBAN PLANNING
AND POLICY ANALYSIS
The Graduate Program in Urban and Regional Planning
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to prepare students for positions on local, state, and
federal government. For information about program and
policy analysis, call (319) 353-5001.

-#
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Your Josten's College Specialist will be here:
Date: Thursday and Friday
Time: 11:00-4:00
PLACE: Ulrich's Bookstore

Trade In Your
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Phone 662-3201

549 E. University Ave.

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I

Kennedy: The heir
apparent
Southern conservatives who played key
roles in the Senate for many years. It
also means that Senator Edward Ken-
nedy (D-Mass.), one of the Senate's
leading liberals, is now in line to suc-
ceed Eastland as Judiciary Committee
chairman.
-In a statement saying he would not be
a candidate for a seventh Senate term,
Eastland said he had decided he could
not carry out his legislative respon-
sibilities and "at the same time conduct
a long and arduous campaign."
His announcement came just two
days after former Mississippi Gov. Bill
Wailer disclosed he would challenge
Eastland in the state's Democratic
prifiary. Two other candidates had en-
tered the race earlier.
HOWEVER, Eastland said he had no
doubt he would have been re-elected.
had he sought another six-year term in
the Senate.
Shortly after Eastland's announ-
cement, Kennedy met with him in his
office. Kennedy noted that his late
brothers, President John Kennedy and
Attorney General Robert Kennedy, ha4
served with Eastland in the Senate and
said they respected him "as a man of
fairness."
Eastland predicted that Kennedy
would be a good chairman of the com-

Eastland: Calling
it quits

when civil rights was the major issue.
FOR EXAMPLE, Eastland permit-
ted a committee vote, which went
against him, on a bill to break up the
major oil companies. He did the same
on a proposed constitutional amen-
dment to permit direct election of the
President.
However, Kennedy recently took the
lead in bypassing the committee and
putting directly on the Senate calendar
a proposed constitutional amendment
to give full congressional representa-
tion to the District of Columbia. The un-
usual action was taken to avoid the
likelihood the measure would have been
bottled up by Eastland.

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